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Full text of "What's On the Air (Mar-Jun 1931)"

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LITTLE MITZI GREEN MEETS THE MARCH WIND 





^*>jr 




In the brief compass of this page are 
comments on religion, poetry, current 
events, music, humor, fraternity, phys- 
iology and language. Anything here 
you want? 

ST. PETERSBURG, FLA. 



What do you think of my suggestions to de- 
vote two full pages of your magazine to com- 
ments by your readers on radio programs, 
either for good or for bad? It seems to me 
that this would work up an interest in your 
magazine that nothing else could. Radio fans 
would be writing in to you; you could publish 
those that you think are worthy, and it would 
be of inestimable value to the NBC and CBS 
in finding out what the public thinks of their 
programs, because you would get all sorts of 
criticisms of certain programs, as well as let- 
ters expressing their appreciation of others. 

F. H. L. 



McALESTER, OKLA.. 

I call to your attention the fact that the 
lectures of Rev. Charles Coughlin, of Detroit, 
over the Columbia chain on Sunday evenings, 
are being challenged as to whether or not they 
should be continued. 

I have been deeply interested in these lec- 
tures and they are of very great importance. 
By all means let the lectures continue. 

J. A. S. 



WINCHESTER, IND. 



The following poem was read over WLW by 
McQueen, "The Scrapbook Man," last week. 
So many have requested it that I send it in to 
your magazine: 

"On those long, cold winter evenings, 
When the howling winds do blow, 
We have one great consolation — 
Just turn on the radio. 

"Then we seat ourselves in comfort 
In a good old easy-chair, 
With our daily paper handy, 
And good programs on the air. 

"Yes, Amos 'n' Andy are really good, 
With their programs fair and square, 
And we always listen for Bill Hay 
When he speaks out, 'Heh-the-are.' 

"Now, if you own a radio, 

Come — with yourselves be fair; 
If you want your programs listed well, 
Just read What's on the Air." 



SAN ANTONIO, TEX. 



The following contributed by S. W. C: 
Ad in San Antonio Evening News: "Lost or 
strayed from Radio Station WOAI, one pair 
of mare mules, one with blaze face. Finder 
please phone CR. 4365." 



WOOD RIDGE, N. J. 



I wish to thank you for the information 
about the picture of Rudy Vallee, as now I 
shall be able to notify the members of my 
Rudy Vallee Club — and there arc some five 
hundred members — who will all be very glad 
to buy the magazine. You see, we all have 
scrapbooks and keep every bit of news and pic- 
tures we find of Mr. Vallee. H. M. K. 



COLUMBUS, O. 

I am very deaf, and for many years didn't 
know of such a thing as jazz. I knew 
"Nearer, My God, To Thee," "Blest Be the 
Tie that Binds," and other such sacred songs, 
taught me in my childhood, but jazz was un- 
known until I heard it over radio. 

Have not missed a day in more than six 
years in spending from two to six hours at 
my radio sets. Have one in living-room and 
one in bedroom. I attach the loud ear 'phones 
and let her go. C. W. R. 



wind Hanapi." By the way, I'd appreciate 
you giving him a word in "What's on the 
Air." G. M. S. 



SPRINGFIELD, VT. 



I think the radio programs are better in 
some ways, and in other ways could be im- 
proved. We are all glad to get programs fur- 
nished by the United States Army and Navy 
Bands, and I wish they would give us evening 
programs as well as daytime. Walter Dam- 
rosch always keeps his work right up to the 
mark. We enjoy the "Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra," and the "Stephen St. John Banjo 
Club" is very good for that kind. There is 
also "The Little German Band" Monday eve- 
nings from KDKA that is very good, and they 
can sing too. B. A. Rolfe's "Lucky Strike 
Dance Orchestra" is good in their type of mu- 
sic. I just wish we might have more band 
music or real good orchestra music in place of 
these terrible "screech owls" that some of the 
lady singers are. Not all ladies can sing well 
for radio broadcasting; they "put on" too 
much. A male quartet is generally very good, 
but they can not do themselves justice in sing- 
ing "I'll Be Blue Just Thinking of You" and 
"One Hour Alone with You" and that class 
of "mush." 

By the way, have you ever realized how very 
few programs there are that are of interest to 
our boys that are from twelve to seventeen 
years of age? Don't you imagine if some one 
in our wonderful country could bring them- 
selves to a big interest in the Boy Scouts, that 
a program in that line would not but be of 
much benefit to our lads? Boys like music, 
but they do not care to have the world know 
that they are wondering "Who Is Kissing Her 
Now," any more than our husbands do. 



SYDNEY, AUSTRALIA 

Mr. Kangaroo: "But Mary, where's the 
child?" 

Mrs. Kangaroo: "Good heavens! I've had 
my pocket picked." D. A. W. 



HARTFORD, CONN. 

We of Connecticut boast of two lexico- 
graphical phenomena. The first is a lake 
which in all the glory of its combined syllables 
contains forty-four letters. It is Lake Tchar- 
goggagogmanchaugagoggchaubunagungam au g, 
which, translated from the Indian, means, 
"Lake You Fish on Your Side; I Fish on 
Mine; Nobody Shall Fish in the Middle." The 
second is my friend, "Mike" Hanapi, who 
leads the Ilima Islanders troupe of Hawaiians 
who belong to the staff of Station WTIC of 
Hartford. Before "Mike" applied the shears 
to his last name, he gloried in the polysyllabic 
appellation of Kealiiahonuihanapi, which, trans- 
lated from the Hawaiian, means "Chief Long- 



CHICAGO, ILL. 



Opportunities have been afforded various na- 
tionalities to bring special "hours" or "pro- 
grams" to WCFL's audience which would 
acquaint that audience with the folk music of 
different nationalities. German, Jewish, Irish, 
Spanish, Polish, Lithuanian, Russian, Swedish, 
Italian, Bohemian — all have been represented. 
I have noticed that foreign programs have 
been a major policy of the station, possibly 
because it was felt that with their listeners 
sufficient interest could be developed to sell 
the idea of unionism and the ideals of the 
American Federation of Labor all the better 
to people who might never otherwise be 
susceptible to assimilation. H. F. P. 



ELGIN, ILL. 

Please send to me the issue that has the 
picture of "Herr Louie and the Weasel" of 
"Herr Louie's Hungry Five." 

I think the picture of "Herr Louie and the 
Weasel" was in the October issue. 

I am enclosing fifteen cents for the issue 
that has the picture of "Herr Louie and the 
Weasel" in it. If you haven't the issue that 
has the picture of "Herr Louie" in it, then 
wait and send to me a February issue. 

Thanking you in advance for the issue that 
has the picture of "Herr Louie and the Weasel" 
in it. G. 

("Herr Louie and the Weasel," please note.) 



WAPAKONETA, O. 



I would like to ask that in your next issue 
you will give us the low-down on Bill Hay, of 
Tuesday night, January 6; when he went to 
announce the Amos 'n' Andy program at 7 p. 
M., he could hardly talk for lack of breath. 

We all know the program is sometimes 
breath-taking. C. E. B. 



NEW BRITAIN, CONN. 

I enjoy your magazine so much. It is full 
of interest from cover to cover. 

Please print all you can about Floyd Gib- 
bons. Kindly give us a short sketch of his 
life. I am sure it would be interesting. 

Is there any hope of his return for nightly 
broadcasts? We miss him so much. 

A Group of Radio Fans. 



GRAND RAPIDS, MICH. 

Mrs. Flubb — Has your new neighbor, Mrs. 
Funkbaugh, entertained any of you informally 
yet? 

Mrs. Dubb — Often. Only yesterday she 
and her husband had a row on the back 
porch, and it proved so interesting that we 
abandoned Amos 'n' Andy for it. 



WHAT'S ON THE AlR 



(Registered In U. S. Patent Office 1 ) 



Vol. II. 



MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 




Published monthly at Ninth ind Oi i i \i cnnati, 0., nv what's ON 

THE ai i; en. Printbd in i . s \ 

Editoriai ind Circulation Opfioes Bos 6. Statioh N, Cincinnati, O. 

\n\ i iri'isi Mi OFFICES: II NV. F0RT1 SECOND ST., \iw fORB I [TJ 

I'KIrl I .i r I ' 

(Copyright, 1981, by What's o» thi Ur Oo.) 

Patents applied for ooveb basic feati ram-finding service offered 

in in is MAO v/i n i 

"Entered ^s second-class mati i 19 LS it thi post-office at Cincin- 

nati, 0., under i in Lot of Marob B, L879." 



BROCKTON, MASS. 

"What's' On The Am" 

'What's on the Air," I rave about it, 
'What's on the Air," can't do without it, 

'Cause I'm an A-One radio fan. 
"What's on the Air" has all the dope, 
Without it I would give up hope, 

But with it I'm a contented man. 

"What's on the Air," it sure lets one know 
About the artists on the radio, 

And gives one news important and true. 
Some magazine, I'll tell the folks, 
With clever stories and new jokes; 

Read it once and you will like it too. 

"What's on the Air" has a clever way 
Of showing programs broadcast night and 
day, 
And keeps one posted for a long time. 
"What's on the Air" has a fair price, 
It wins strong praise because it's nice. 
It's really great — take this tip of mine. 
O. E. C. 



CHARLESTON, S. C. 



What is the matter with the Old Dutch 
Minstrel program? I have been unable to get 
it for the last two weeks. C. L. L. 



KENOSHA, WIS. 



I wish you would give a little "nook" in 
your splendid radio magazine to Frank E. Mc- 
Bride, announcer at WMAQ, Chicago. He has 
a rich, mellow voice, full of sincere friendli- 
ness; he is about twenty-four years old, six 
feet tall, dark hair and brown eyes; very good- 
looking, and has a very charming personality. 

I hope you will pardon me for taking up 
your time, but it will make me exceedingly 
happy if you will grant my wish. Mr. Mc- 
Bride does not know about my "hallucination." 

C. H. 



CINCINNATI, O. 

Did you ever notice that three CBS an- 
nouncers' voices sound alike? They are 
Frank Knight, David Ross and George Buech- 
ler. At our house we guess who it is, but 
most always guess wrong. 

Can you persuade WKRC to handle Hey- 
wood Broun's broadcast? I usually get it in 
St. Louis, but I would much rather have it 
in Cincinnati. M. P. 



ONTARIO, CANADA 



Will you please tell me if "Majestic Curi- 
osity Shop," at 9 P. M., Sundays, has been dis- 
continued? C. A. H. 
(Gone, but not forgotten.) 



BRIDGEPORT, CONN. 



As I shall soon be eighty years of age, you 
see I have no ulterior motive in asking the age 
of Mr. Richard Maxwell, as Mr. Maxwell is 
my favorite tenor on the radio. 

I remarked to a relative one day: "I believe 
Mr. Maxwell is 'John' with 'Seth Parker'!" 

Well, we both bought the "Seth Parker 
Hymnal" and there we found Mr. Maxwell. 

Once, at "Seth Parker's" Sunday night, last 
summer, he sang one of the Psalms, and his 
voice went up and up and rose evermore 
higher, until I know it must have entered 
heaven. His voice appeals to me for the rich- 
ness of quality and the soul it reveals. 

E. A. D. 



FEB2193 WHAT'S ON THE AlR 

©C1B 105026 



THE MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 



VOLUME II. 



MARCH, 1931 



No. 5 



j^Jltf tsnd Jiffe }\CkcJlo Jfai;ifc 




By 



Merlin JrL AyTe^wwih 



ir\R 
AyWojorbh. 



IF there is anything more remarkable than the 
strides that radio has been making in the past 
few years, it is the change in the taste of the 
public which has been created by this industry. 

I believe that if the National Broadcasting Com- 
pany should broadcast from its studios some evening 
a replica of a typical program that the radio audi- 
ence of ten years ago enjoyed and demanded, our 
present day public would laugh incredulously. 

Who, among those that listened eagerly through 
earphone to simple jazz tunes, plugged by a small 
group of none too competent musicians, dreamed 
that in a miraculously short time they would be 
hearing the voices of world-famous personalities, 
the artistic performances of great symphony or- 
chestras and opera companies, vivid and up-to-the- 
minute descriptions of news and sports events? 
Who dreamed that there would come flocking to 
the broadcasting studios the foremost figures in the 
fields of drama, music, politics, literature, science; 
that brilliant writers would be adapting their talents 
to radio; that such honored members of the acting 
profession as Margaret Anglin, Eva Lc Gallicnnc, 
Dudley Diggs and Rollo Peters would be perform- 
ing for an audience they could not sec? 

Broadcasting is, we admit, controlled to a large 
extent by what the public wishes. At the same 
time radio has managed to direct and develop the 
tastes of its audiences to a point where it has won 
the right to be classed as an art. There is to-day 
an art of the radio just as surely as there is an art 
of the theater. The best performances of the air 
arc as worthy of being placed in the category of 
art as the finer performances of the legitimate 
stage, the motion-picture theater, or even the con- 
cert halls. 

Every one realizes, in a general way, the amaz- 
ing progress that radio has made in the past decade. 
But I doubt if many except those actually engaged 
in the business of broadcasting appreciate the full 
extent of the changes that have occurred in both 



program building and the technique of broadcasting. 
In the beginning, the only kind of program that 
held the attention of the public was popular music. 
The introduction of the first broadcast symphonic 
music in 1922 was a tremendously radical under- 
taking. Every one knows the results of this first 
timid step in the direction of symphonic broad- 
casts. We now have the regular programs of Walter 
Damrosch and the National Symphony Orchestra, 
Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Symphony 
Orchestra, and the Rochester Symphony Orchestra. 
Their programs have an enormous and enthusiastic 
following. If there were any doubt as to their 
popularity, it would be dispelled by the fact that 
commercial sponsors have sufficient confidence to 
back them. It is conceded that the first concern 
of a commercial sponsor is to select the type of 
program which will attract the most listeners. 

The same situation exists in regard to solo 
artists. A list of concert and opera stars who are 
heard over the microphone is equivalent to a roster 
of the world's greatest musical artists — Jeritza, 
Galli-Curci, Schumann-Heink, John Charles 
Thomas Gigli, Rethberg, Tibbett, Ponselle, Werren- 
rath, Mary Garden among the vocalists — Heifetz, 
Spalding, Levitzki, Josef Hofmann, Mischa Elman 
and Gabrilowitch among the instrumentalists. 

Opera has also become firmly entrenched on our 
radio programs. It was in 1927 that the National 
Broadcasting Company first began relaying per- 
formances from the stage of the Chicago Civic 
Opera-house. Interest in these broadcasts has 
grown beyond the most optimistic expectations. 
This is due, in part, to the acquiring of a taste for 
opera on the part of the public, and in part to im- 
provement in the technique of broadcasting, which 
enables the microphone to do full justice to a per- 
formance of this nature. Perhaps it is apropos to 
call attention to the fact that the Chicago Opera 
Company itself so appreciates the importance of 
these broadcasts that on evenings when the radio 
audience is to listen in, the operatic schedule is 
arranged with the utmost care so that it will 
coincide with the requirements of the hook-up. On 
these evenings the opera company gives as much 
consideration to the unseen audience scattered 
throughout the country as to the glittering one 
seated in its own auditorium. 

As for concert music, it has become an in- 
dispensable part of our daily broadcasts. There is 
not an evening but that concert music of the high- 
est caliber is heard over our networks. Confidence 
in its attention-getting powers is revealed by the 
extent to which it is utilized by commercial spon- 
sors. We have such sponsors as Strombcrg Carlson 
broadcasting the Rochester Symphony Orchestra, 
Atwatcr Kent and Victor engaging the best concert- 
hall talent for their programs. Maxwell House giv- 
ing programs of purely concert nature, General 
Electric sponsoring che Damrosch Hour, Philco 
sponsoring Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchcs- 



of To P^v 



THE PRESIDENT OF THE NATIONAL 
BROADCASTING COMPANY SENDS A 
MESSAGE TO "W. O. T. A." READERS 






tra. Then we have such sustaining features as 
"Works of Great Composers," the Victor Herbert 
Operettas, the splendid music heard in the Slumber 
Hour, and Black and Gold Room dinner music. 

There are also the significant broadcasts of the 
National Oratorio Society, with Reinald Werren- 
rath conducting. Each week this group presents 
the finest works in the oratorio repertoire. I wonder 
what the reaction would have been ten years ago 
if we had attempted to give the radio public ora- 
torio music? Surely we have come a long way 
when we no longer have to consider, "Will it be 
over their heads?" Surely we have come a long 
way when radio gives its public Stravinsky's 
"Sacre du Printemps" without worrying about the 
consequences. 

The development of a finer and more sophisti- 
cated taste in music is even affecting broadcasts 
of popular music. Gone are the days when rhythm 
and pep were the only essentials in playing jazz 
over the air. Now highly paid staffs are employed 
in making special orchestral arrangements for 
nearly every composition that is played. Frequently 
these arrangements cost $250 and $300 each. 
Sometimes an hour's program presented by B. A. 
Rolfe, Horace Heidt, Vincent Lopez or Rudy Vallee 
represents the equivalent of several thousand dollars 
spent just on arrangements of the numbers. 

Before leaving the subject ot musical broadcasts 
I should like to call attention to the advance in 
radio technique that makes possible almost perfect 
broadcasting — the registering of the softest pianis- 
simo, the richest effects of a symphony orchestra, 
the most artistic finesse in bringing out the color 
of each orchestral instrument. The National Broad- 
casting Company has a large stall of technicians 
constantly working on improvements and experi- 
menting on new effects. This force is supple- 
mented by the vast resources of the General Electric 
and Wcstinghousc Companies. 

If we turn our attention now to what radio 
is doing in the field of drama, we find a progress 
which is almost as remarkable as that which has 
been made in music. There was a time when no 
sort of talking was tolerated over the loud-speaker, 
except for that of the announcers relative to the 
broadcasting of musical programs. 

To-day we find drama and dialogue playing an 
exceedingly important part in daily broadcasting. 
The National Broadcasting Company has added to 
its personnel an imposing array of dramatic writers 
and theatrical experts who arc adapting the master- 
pieces of the legitimate stage to this new medium. 
By skillfully rearranging stage plays so that they 
conform to the requirements of the microphone, 



Page 4 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



these experts are enabling the radio public to hear 
the best in classical and contemporary drama. 

We have broadcast from our studios a series 
of Shakespearean plays with remarkable success, to 
judge from the response from the public. And may 
I remark here that the plays of this great author 
are almost perfectly adapted to the radio produc- 
tion. Very little revision is required to make them 
suitable to the microphone. Had Shakespeare in- 
tentionally set about writing his masterpieces for 
radio, he could have done no better. This is because 
they depend more on conversation than on action 
for dramatic effect. If his following in the world 
of the theater has somewhat diminished in recent 
years, I am sure it will be more than replaced by 
a vast new audience which has come to enjoy and 
revere him through the performance of his master- 
pieces over the air. 

Another overnight development in radio is the 
broadcasting of special events. The National 
Broadcasting Company considers this phase of its 
activities of such significance that it has organized 
a special department to take charge of such broad- 
casts, seeking to dramatize those that lend them- 



selves to such treatment. For example, I might 
point to the recent broadcasting of the descent of 
a submarine. It is superfluous to mention the high 
standard we have reached in the microphone report- 
ing of sports events — football, baseball, boxing 
matches and the like. The public is avid for dra- 
matic air versions of such happenings. 

Touching on the educational angle of broadcast- 
ing, the National Broadcasting Company already re- 
serves considerable time, and intends to reserve still 
more, for programs of this nature. Through edu- 
cational programs the radio audience has been 
awakened to an appreciation of the cultural arts 
almost without being aware of it. May I speak 
particularly of Walter Damrosch, who has done 
more to arouse an interest in fine music among the 
American people than any other individual? Gifted 
with a genius for entertaining while he educates, 
he has created a vast following which has gladly 
absorbed the fundamentals of symphony music as 
presented by him until now they have as deep an 
appreciation as have the regular concert-hall audi- 
ences. It is to Damrosch that we owe a large share 
of the progress that has been made generally 



in the broadcasting of higher forms of music. 

Our educational works also include numerous 
talks of authorities on law, crime prevention, health, 
politics, literature. Men of such standing as Merle 
Thorpe, William Hard, Montrose Moses and David 
Lawrence have been keeping our listeners in touch 
with the latest developments in business and finance. 
We have talks by college presidents, statesmen, 
authors, leaders of the fields of aviation, commerce 
and invention. Far from being bored, the public 
welcomes these programs. It wants variety in its 
daily radio diet. It is ready to give a hearing to pro- 
grams of all sorts, providing they represent the best 
of their kind. The one thing it insists upon is a 
superior and finished production, whether the pro- 
gram be music, drama, education or sports. There 
must be no hurried throwing together of material, 
no second-rate talent, no slipshod performance. If 
a program is to hope for a large number of listeners, 
it must be presented in the most effective way pos- 
sible. 

The public wants artistic perfection in its 
radio programs, and that is what we of the radio 
industry are trying to give it. 



AUSTRALIA, STAGE FOR PROGRAM DUEL 

Tax-sponsored Programs Face Bid of Commercially Sponsored 
Programs for Public Favor. Independent Stations Organize Chain 



IN the Land of the Southern Cross, of the Kan- 
garoo, of the "Auxsies," of the "Boys from 
Down Under," or what have you, two radio pro- 
gram systems are meeting in direct competition 
for public favor. In addition to the chain of Gov- 
ernment-owned stations, supported by direct tax 
upon every set owner, there have developed a num- 
ber of independent stations presenting commercially 
sponsored programs. Quite recently leading inde- 
pendent stations have developed a chain plan making 
it possible for them to exchange their more notable 
programs on a Commonwealth-wide basis. Thus 
it bids fair to happen that in Australia the British 
and the American broadcast systems will be tested 
out side by side. Insomuch as the American plan 
of commercial sponsorship grew up among us before 
our Government was really aware of the importance 
of radio, we believe our readers will be personally 
interested in the facts about the Australian situa- 
tion and will want to know about future develop- 
ments. 

As we have said, Australia has two systems of 
broadcasting stations. First there are "A" class 



stations supplying a natural broadcasting service 
for the Commonwealth Government. This is 
operated by the Australian Broadcasting Co., Ltd., 
at the head of which is Mr. Stuart F. Doyle, who is 
also the head of the Union Theaters, Ltd., through- 
out Australia. Associated with him on the direc- 
torate are Sir Benjamin Fuller (head of a chain 
of vaudeville theaters, the majority of which are 
now operating talkie pictures) and Mr. Frank 
Albert, who is head of a very large music and pub- 
lishing house. This A. B. C. receives from the Gov- 
ernment 12 shillings per license. These licenses 
are taken out by every listener-in who possesses a 
radio set, and each pays 24 shillings per year 
(approximately six dollars). Half of this tax goes 
to the Government which maintains the stations and 
does all the technical work, while the other half 
goes to the A. B. C, which controls the programs 
and management of the stations throughout Aus- 
tralia. There are eight of these "A" class stations 
in Australia; one in Brisbane, Q.; two in Sydney, 
N. S. W.; two in Melbourne, V.; one in Adelaide, 
S. A.; one in Perth, W. A., and one in Hobart. 



Second, there are independent stations number- 
ing about thirty in all, and varying in power from 
100 watts to 3,000. These are licensed as "B" 
class stations. They do not participate in any way 
whatsoever in the Government revenue produced 
from license fees. They must depend on their ad- 
vertising revenue just as do the American stations. 

Recently the J. Walter Thompson Advertising 
Agency of New York City opened an office in 
Sydney and began to organize and sponsor radio 
programs over a chain of Australian independent 
stations, just as they and other agencies utilize CBS 
and NBC in America. Evidently these chain-spon- 
sored programs have been of outstanding merit and 
have won a wide hearing. At least, since their ad- 
vent, the press has been stirred to take up cudgels 
in defense of the tax-sponsored programs — a clear 
indication that the two systems will test each other 
out quite thoroughly before many months. 

In any event, because of this dawning competi- 
tion between the two systems, Australians arc going 
to enjoy better programs than heretofore. 

The programs of the Australian Broadcasting 



VN\\5£5S3SS53C53533K33r; 



V ^ ^"^ ^ • — - k i ECB53CS5 ■ 1 




March, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Pas 



Company stations (the Government-owned sta- 
tions) resemble greatly those of the average regional 
station in the U. S. A., except that the playing of 
recorded music displaces very largely the usual 
American hotel orchestra periods. Quite a little 
more attention is given to sports events and to nar- 
ration of travel and unusual experience stories than 
American stations have seen fit to give as yet. 
Naturally, the director who owns the theaters sup- 
plies quite a few cinema orchestras and vaudeville 
artists, and the director from the music-house offers 
a goodly quota of song pluggers. 

Here are sample afternoon and evening pro- 
grams from 4QG at Brisbane: 1 p. m., market re- 
ports; 2 p. M., a pianist and violinist and records; 
3 to 4:30, records; 6 p. M., news; 6:10, latest songs; 
6:30 children's period; 7 P. M., markets; 7:30, 
sports review; 8 P. M., gems from "Faust"; 9 P. M., 
boxing contests; 10 P. M., news flashes; 10:3 0, sports 
review; 10:45, records. The following evening an 
hour of vaudeville and an hour of music, featuring 
two sopranos and a banjoist occupied the hours from 
8 to 10 o'clock. Three evenings featured cinema 
and dance orchestras, one a special religious meeting, 
and Sunday evening was devoted to a church serv- 
ice followed by a symphonic concert. 

We have not as yet received program schedules 
from the independent stations, but have at hand 
descriptions of the General Motors Family Party 
Hour and the Kraft Cheese Radio Hour, both of 
which are broadcast over a Commonwealth-wide 
hook-up. 

Both are typical of the better-developed chain 
programs to which American listeners are accus- 
tomed. There are the usual special orchestras, in- 
strumentalists and vocalists, guest artists from the 
concert stage and the figure of the moment from 
the world of sports or current events. 

If there is a particular weakness in the Gov- 
ernment-owned system of broadcasting, we would 
judge it lies in the tendency of such a system to 
stick to a program schedule planned long in ad- 
vance. It lacks the news instinct. That is probably 
why General Motors' feat in putting the sensational 
batsman of Australia's champion cricket team on 
the air immediately on his arrival from England 
broke through the Australian press apathy toward 
independent radio. 

The following from a Sydney paper tells that 
story: 

"Possibly one of the most spectacular advertis- 
ing stunts in Australian history was the sensational 



tie-up of Don Bradman — the world's youngest and 
most brilliant batsman — a member of the Australian 
Eleven and responsible to a large extent for Aus- 
tralia wresting the 'Ashes' from England. 

"Upon the arrival of the S. S. 'Oronsay,' in 
Freemantle, Don Bradman and the other cricketers 
were met by a delegation including heads of General 
Motors, local General Motors dealers and leading 
citizens, including the Lord Mayor. General 
Motors automobiles carried Bradman and this dele- 
gation to Perth, where the official welcome took 
place, and presentation of the special General Motors 
Memorial Medal was made by the Lord Mayor of 
Perth. 

"After the civic reception in Adelaide, Don 
Bradman spoke over the radio station 5AD, Adelaide, 
during the General Motors Family Party Hour, and 
upon arrival in Melbourne Bradman spoke over the 
same Commonwealth-wide hook-up from Station 
3DB, Melbourne, on another Family Party 
Hour. 

"Sydney's welcome, sponsored by Gen- 
eral Motors, Australia, took the form of 



a huge gala concert in the Sydney Town Hall. This, 
too, was broadcast over a Commonwealth-wide 
hook-up." 

We wonder if our readers are interested as we 
are in this unique testing of broadcasting systems. 



"1 






UClddO-O 



Ann Luciano, who has featured in 
the General Motors Family Party Hour 
anil the Kraft Cheese Radio Hour. Ann 
possesses a voice wide in range and 
noticeable for its peculiar sweetness. 



Australia's most brilliant bats man, 
Don Bradman, stepping from the Gen- 
eral Motors plane and waving to the 
waiting thousands on arrival at Essen- 
don aerodrome, Melbourne, from Ade- 
laide. Bradman was taken to Station 
}DB, Melbourne, where he broadcast 
a message to Commonwealth-wide radio 
enthusiasts in the General Motors 
Family Party Hour. 




Captain Woodfull returning thanks on behalf of the Australian Eleven for the Memorial 
Medals presented in Perth to each member of the Cricket Team by General Motors of Aus- 
tralia. 



The Famous Octette featured on many of the General Motors Family Party Hour 
and Kraft Cheese Radio Hour broadcasts, relayed over a Commonu-calth-ividc hook-up 
of "B" Class stations. 



Page 6 



WHAT'S OX THE A I II 



March, 1931 



m 



h<?y 




so Serve 



^^. By ^\»ekflcs (^(jee ^cfewms 



T 



HE conversation had turned to radio, as con- 
X versation does sooner or later. Somebody 
chuckled over the latest Amos 'n' Andy episode. 
The crowd joined in. That reminded some one 
else of one of Phil Cook's bull's-eyes. More 
chuckles. Which in turn brought up Joe and 
Vi, whose last effort the hostess thought especially 
funny. But the man camped by the smoking-stand 
cast his vote for the Detective Story Hour. The 
girl on the divan shivered and proclaimed her 
preference for the True Story Hour. The quiet 
boy near the piano ventured a word of admiration 
for Walter Damrosch. By this time, however, the 
two sports fans in the corner were arguing merrily 
over the respective merits of Ted Husing and 
Bill Munday. 

Does all that have a familiar ring? Doubtless 
it does, for whenever listeners discuss radio the con- 
versation is pretty certain to be concerned with 
artists, actors, announcers, speakers and orchestra 
directors. 

Such a thing is altogether natural. Listeners 
think first, if not exclusively, of artists, actors, an- 
nouncers, speakers and orchestra directors when 
they think of radio, because these personalities sup- 
ply what comes out of the dynamic, and, what is 
more, my son, get the publicity breaks. Yet there 
are others who contribute as much, sometimes more, 
to programs and remain unknown. 

This is not a highbrow attempt to upset a 
"popular notion;" just a statement of fact that 
should interest listeners who like to give credit 
where credit is due. 

Intelligent movie-goers do not make the mis- 
take of assuming that a successful film depends 
entirely on the stars. They know that a pleasing 
picture represents the pooled efforts of a director, 
assistant director, story writers, scene builders, 
supporting casts, camera men and recording engi- 
neers as well as of the stars. And the same is true 
in radio. 

People who never appear before microphones, 
whose names arc not announced on the air, have an 
important share in every major program. So it 
seems high time to speak a word for these anony- 
mous and unsung contributors to our loud-speaker 
pleasure. 

The parallel between radio and the movies fits 
surprisingly well. Beginning at the top, there is 
the production manager, who does much the same 
for broadcasting as the director for a film. 

Every feature heard on the chains, or from a 
large individual station, is in charge of some one 
who bears his title. He is responsible for the pro- 
gram — its planning, preparation and presentation. 

If it includes music, as most do, one of his chief 
lieutenants is the musical director. This individual 
may, or may not, wield a baton; even may not be 
present when the program is finally run off, for 
often his job is simply to select the right music. 

If that sounds easy, let it be added that he has, 
and needs, the help of a musical librarian — somebody 
most listeners probably never have heard of. For 
example, the NBC maintains a large staff to collect 
the thousand and one kinds of music called for in 
its programs and catalog it for immediate refer- 
ence. 

In addition, there are arrangers, the men behind 




the "special arrangement" line which listeners 
barely notice. And they, too, work. 

If the feature goes in for something dramatic, 
as many are these days, the production manager 
buzzes for another chief lieutenant — the continuity 
writer. His assignment may be to adapt a play as 
in Hank Simmons' Showboat; or a published story, 
as for Collier's Hour or the Sherlock Holmes series; 
again, turn out an original piece like Arabesque 
or the Crime Prevention sketches. 

Also, he must write the announcer's lines. 
These may sound as if they were extemporized. But 
be not deceived. Except in emergencies or for eye- 
witness descriptions, announcers read their pieces 
from typewritten scripts because timing is so im- 
portant. 

Even in eye-witness descriptions writers play 
their unrecognized part. Have you ever marveled 
at the stream of facts and figures an announcer 
uncorks while he is waiting for a big event to come 
off? The explanation is a sheaf of neatly typed 
sheets. For instance, during the football season 
Columbia has a man who gives his whole time to 
preparing information on the two teams playing 
each Saturday for Ted Husing to use if, as and 
when he needs this stop-gap matter. 

Going back to drama again, one of the produc- 
tion manager's top sergeants is the sound-effects 
man. Producing sound effects is an art in itself. 
Strangely enough, the real thing rarely sounds real- 
istic at the loud-speaker. So imitation is the an- 
swer, and some of the counterfeits the sound-effects 
men cook up entail much patient testing. 

Every program which reaches an audience of 
any considerable size represents the pooled efforts 
of all these people, besides, of course, musicians, 
actors and announcers. It may seem casual and in- 
formal, as if it were being improvised. But be 
assured that these behind-the-scenes workers have 
spent hours planning and rehearsing each word and 
note, though the performance on the air lasts only 
fifteen or thirty minutes. 

Moreover, it can not be put on the air without 
the help of still other workers — the technicians; 
for without them a radio program is about as use- 
less as a movie scene without camera men or record- 
ing engineers. It may be a perfect gem. but nobody 
will be able to hear it. 

Like the production manager and his lieutenants, 
the technician's job begins long before the fea- 
ture is broadcast. In the case of a studio show. 



their work starts at the first re- 
hearsal, placing the microphones and 
grouping artists to get the best acous- 
tical results. 

If it is a sports broadcast, or the descrip- 
tion of a big public spectacle, those in the 
field force install portable equipment in stadiums 
or at vantage points along parade routes. When a 
short-wave relay is called for, as is now often the 
case, they may have to spend months perfecting 
the special apparatus needed. 

And when the actual time for the broadcast is 
at hand, another force of technicians, known by 
the prosaic name of operators, takes over. 

One sits in the control-room which adjoins 
each studio, making sure that the volume and tone 
quality arc right. A little farther along a superior 
rechecks him in the master control-room whence the 
program is fed to the network or the transmitter. 
Out on the chain lines other operators stand watch 
at key points to keep our entertainment coming to 
us without flaw or interruption. And at the 
transmitter from which it finally reaches our re- 
ceivers, more operators adjust and attend the array 
of apparatus whose functioning most of us somehow 
take as a matter of course. 

They get no fan mail, glowing write-ups or 
votes in popularity contests. In fact, about the 
only notice they receive from listeners is a growl 
on those infrequent occasions when something goes 
wrong. Yet they do their part, sometimes when 
duty means danger. 

For instance, during one of Columbia's inter- 
national broadcasts an essential wire broke in a 
control-room. The wire carried voltage high 
enough to cause most of us to leave it strictly 
alone. Without hesitation an operator held the 
broken ends together until the rebroadcast was 
finished, receiving burns that scarcely could be 
classified as pleasant. Probably the few who read 
of his act at the time have forgotten it. Yet, with- 
out the devotion of this one man a nation-wide audi- 
ence would have been denied a program it was 
expecting. 

We hear the program, enjoy it, and probably 
remark that the musicians or actors were in par- 
ticularly good form. They may have been, too. 
This is no attempt to detract from what is right- 
fully due those who are heard before microphones. 
But it docs seem time to reflect that radio is not a 
one-man, or few-men, show, and that those who 
contribute to our pleasure need not remain unsung 
merely because they are unheard. 

Like football, broadcasting demands teamwork. 
I lere's to the centers, guards and tackles of radio. 
They must be in there, playing every minute, if 
the game is to be won. 



March, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 7 




If 




GEORGE FRAME 
BROWN in person be- 
fore the microphone 
ind then as Mayor Matt 
Tompkins talking across 
the gate to Martha 
(played by Virginia 
Farmer) and finally 
as Mrs. Jones. 

VIRGINIA FARM- 
ER is not only Mar- 
tha, but Grand m a 
Overbrook. 



NBC, MONDAYS AT 
9:30 P. M., £. S. T. 





G. UNDERHILL 
MACY plays not only 
the volatile "Tony," 
pictured below, but is 
also Fred Tibbetts, the 
village barber. 



Across the page is 
PIIOIBE MACKAY in 
her usual Monday-night 
role as Mrs. Walls. 



Behind ike Scenes «fifo"KeaI Yolks 



\ GLIMPSE behind the scenes, when "Real Folks" comes over 
J. \. the air, would prove in the nature of a revelation for trusting 
ones who believe all they hear. The doubling-up of parts, whereby 
a whole village of amusing people is created through the impersona- 
tion of a mere handful of clever actors, would be surprise number 
one. The delineation of feminine roles by men, and vice versa, humans 
affecting animals sounds, and various broadcasting devices used to 
produce the sound effect of a lively community at full tilt, would 
certainly increase the interest in this exceedingly popuar radio offering. 

George Frame Brown, the originator of the sketch, created the 
"Real Folks" types from actual small-town and rural characters whom 
he has known in various parts of the United States. Long a prominent 
figure in the theater, as both actor and playright, Mr. Brown has picked 
up a rich store of material in his travels. His mother, who was a 
teacher for many years near Seattle, where Mr. Brown grew up, is a 
collaborator to the extent that she supplies ideas and choice bits, which 
make the "Real Folks" program more human and entertaining. This 
material Mr. Brown supplements by constant visits to shopkeepers 
and "real folks" of rural New York. 

Mr. Brown's first great radio success came as Luke Higgins in 
Main Street. In the "Real Folks" program he takes three parts — 
Mayor Matt Thompkins, Mrs. Jones and Gus Oleson. 

Martha Thompkins, of the Chesebrough program, is ably played 
by Virginia Farmer, who came to radio from the stage. Would you 
ever suspect the portrayer of "Aunt Martha" of being also the quaver- 
ing-voiced Grandma Overbrook? It's true. Miss Farmer does both 
parts. 

Edwin Whitney, who plays the "Real Folks" characters of Judge 
Whipple, Grandpa Overbrook, Bill Perkins and Prince, the dog, is an 
NBC production man, a well-known actor and one who takes many 
character roles on other radio programs. He imitates crying babies, 
katydids, birds, dogs, cats and airplane motors in a manner marvelous 
to hear. 

Elsie Mae Gordon shows her versatility and keeps the transmitter 
busy with a whole repertoire of "Real Folks" parts. 

Mrs. Watts, the Cockney boarding-house-keeper and songbird, 
could be no one but a real English woman. She is Phcebe Mackay, a 
native of Britain, though not Cockney, and a possessor of a lovely 
singing voice, which she disguises in fearful and ludicrous manner 
for Mrs. Watts' prima-donna attempts. 

G. Underhill Macy is impersonator of the volatile Tony and also 
of Fred Tibbetts, village barber and aspirant to the hand of Miss 
Harbert, the school-teacher. Mr. Macy is possessor of a wonderful 
singing voice, which he uses for both characters. 

Tommy Brown, the sixteen-year-old boy who is the "Real Folks" 
Elmer, is a seasoned motion-picture performer and has appeared be- 
hind the footlights besides. 

It is interesting to note that since "Real Folks" had its inception, 
practically the same group of actors has stayed together and played 
together without change. Even that famous Fireman's Band, directed 
by Harry Salter, has remained constantly loyal to Thompkins Corners. 
For their "sour" rendition of popular and classical airs, they do not 
have special arrangements, but develop the comic effects themselves. 



■*■• 




EDWIN WHITNEY 
plays Judge Whipple. 





I I Ml ,\l \l GOR- 
DON is not only "Mrs. 
Stevens," but also Sneed, 
Euple Yager, Miss Har- 
bert and the baby, COM- 
MUNITY. 

II til R, in real life, is 
sixteen-year-old Tommy 
Brou n. 




Page 8 



WHAT'S OX T H K AIR 



March, 1931 



ryDwrTrbflr^Li^oun ' 1\c\gIo1 



cjo^ 



UWh UJendeU h<Jl 

t^ecf Headed Music MeJter 



HELLO, Folks, how are you-all 
chis evenin'? Yes, Suh! Old 
1931 started out with a radio bang 
and is still goin', Rampant and 
Rarin', along snappily and happily! 
With the "cuts" and "slices" and un- 
employment in other lines of busi- 
ness — the broadcast racket seems to 
be getting along a little better than most of the 
rest. We're kickin' a little, but more as a matter 
of mob psychology than anything else, I guess. 
We are workin', and when one account goes "off 
the air" another usually finds its way on, so every- 
body's happy! Granted, the contracts are not for 
as long a duration as of a few months back, but 
they are contracts. Paul Whiteman starts a new 
account out of NBC, Chicago, over the "Rhap- 
sody in Blue" network. Vernon Dalhart, of 
"Prisoner Song" fame, and his little Southern part- 
ner, Adelyn Hood, in "Barber-shop Chords," 
from Columbia N. Y. (two attractive fifteen-min- 
ute periods a week). By the way, this is not 
"Dai's" real name at all. He took it as a profes- 
sional name years ago when he left his home in 
Texas. Vernon and Dalhart are both to be found 
on the' map as towns in Texas! The Old Dutch 
Girl, Irene Beasley. "The Long, Tall Girl" from 
down around Memphis way, on Columbia morn- 
ings with a small orchestra. That's puttin' Dixie 
in Dutch. Edgar Guest and the Detroit Sym- 
phony, over Columbia from WXYZ in Detroit. 
I presented Guest for his first chain appearance, 
and from a result standpoint he proved one of 
radio's great attractions. Trust he knocks 'em 
for a row of barrel-hoops in this new set-up. 
"Household Celebrities," featuring Adolphe Dumont 
(of Paris and of the Presentation Theaters) with 
another big Symphony Orchestra, is heard from 
NBC, Chicago. Yep, the New Year brought a 
number of new hours originating from "local" 
points. There have always been quite a few hours 
originating elsewhere than in the New York and 
Chicago studios, as you know, like Stromberg-Carl- 
son, from Rochester; Tony Cabooch, from St. Louis; 
Heinz, from Pittsburgh, etc. Now comes Barnsdall 
over Columbia from their own "remote" station 
KOIL, in Council Bluffs, la. You'll be seein' more 
and more of this as the radio years roll by. 

NEVER will forget 'bout the most amusin' 
experience I had with Shell was one evenin' 
when all was tense 'n' quiet — jes' before we got 
those magic words "You're on the air" the drum- 
mer of Art Kasscl's Orchestra (a South Caro- 
lina boy who was handlin' the props that eve) 
comes a-runnin' to mc 'n' whispers, "Say, Mistah 
Hall, I's suah 'fraid we-all bcttah cut that theah 
'storm' numbah." All upset, I hollers, "Cut it — 
why, what's wrong — what's the matter? Art's re- 
hearsed on it, isn't he?" Drummer drawls back, 
"Umhuh, but somebody stole mah thunder!" 

AS well as this country becoming a two-car 
home, it is likewise becoming a two-radio 
home. The miniature idea (golf course, table 
tennis, pool, etc.) has crept into nearly every- 
thing, and has virtually upset the Radio-set busi- 
ness. The "Minic" set is by far the biggest and 
best seller to-day. These little sets arc so daw- 




gone good, and so reasonable, that every one is 
getting one. When the new "move-about" set 
comes into the home it usually goes up into the 
bedroom or follows you all over the house, while 
the old, big set stays in the front parlor. That 
makes two. Then, again, the new, regular-sized, 
sets are so reasonable that they very often find their 
way into the choice spot in the living-room, and 
the old set (far too good to be thrown out or 
traded in) finds itself stuck away in the den, the 
library or the kids' playroom. That, too, makes 
two! Then, too, the fella who has always tinkered 
with his set tears the "insides" out of his old set 
and replaces with new parts, then rigs up the old 
"insides" in some box in the basement. That's two, 
too. Yes, suh! We're fastly becomin' a two-radio 
nation, and it's savin' a whole lot o' argument. 

LISTENERS don't seem to be "playin' favor- 
ites" like they used to; most folks still have 
their choice programs "that they wouldn't miss 
for anything," but a great many don't seem 
to care one way or another, just so long as it's 
good entertainment and pleasing to their particular 
taste. One type of modern youth rushes over to 
the radio, when he feels the urge, and tunes from 
station to station until he finds what "entertain- 
ment" pleases, then goes on about his business or 
pleasure at hand. Entertainment (canned, records, 
electrical transcription, or what have you) is O. K. 
to him, just so's it's pleasing and free from obnox- 
ious, overdone advertising. Half the time he 
doesn't even know what station is on, and as far 
as ever writing a letter of program praise — well — 
he'd never even think of getting the inclination, 
let alone doing it. Then there's the other fellow 
who has his favorite station, turns it on and "lets 
her ride." How long has it been since you've 
heard some one say, "I must rush home so as to get 
there in time to hear the such-'n'-such hour"? How 
long has it been since you heard the "morning after" 
stuff, "Say, I heard so-'n'-so last night, and was 
he a Wow?" etc. Well, at that, it's hard to play 
favorites when it's all so good. There is so much 
good stuff to-day that nothing seems to be out- 
standing. However, folks arc missing the real kick 
out of their radio if they don't get to be rabid fans 
of some one — or something or other. 

WELL, I gotta ramble on; did I tell you that 
Dick, of Tom, Dick and Harry, insists that 
the fella that sings those fast choruses on Lucky 
Strike must be Floyd Gibbons? Well, I'll be seein' 
yon! Still doin' a little serious fiddlc-foolin' (jes' 
fiddlin' .noun', an old fiddlin' fool), doin' the 
original one-man show for Libby daytimes. Just 
one young white boy tryin' to get along, so until 
then — sec you pretty soon, pretty soooon, pretty 
sooo-ooo-ooon. Nite Owl! 

Sincerely, 

\\"i NuniL Hall. 



RADIO IN EUROPE 

By E. A. Weir, 

Director of Radio for the Canadian National Rail- 
ways. 

SEVERAL things about broadcasting and recep- 
tion in Great Britain struck me during a recent 
visit to London with greater force than ever before: 
First: the comparative absence from static and 
interference enjoyed by listeners as compared with 
conditions on this continent. It is common to listen 
for an entire evening to one or half a dozen stations 
without any appreciable difficulty in this way be- 
yond occasionally a little fading. There are places 
here where it can be done, too, but, speaking gen- 
erally, we are far more subject to interruptions. 
The larger percentage of surface wires and build- 
ings of steel, or semi-steel, construction in this 
country has a great bearing on reception. 

Second: the large number of excellent programs 
available to European listeners. Within fifteen 
minutes one Sunday evening from a home in West 
London we tuned in Copenhagen, Stockholm, Ber- 
lin, Hilversum (Holland), Paris, Madrid, Rome, 
Milan, Vienna and several others. We stayed long- 
est on Rome (about 700 miles away), where the 
opera Cedrallion was being gloriously sung. Rome 
and Budapest have, I understand, the only regular 
lady announcers in Europe. The European has quite 
as great, if not greater, variety of programs than 
we have on this continent, and they are generally 
of a higher standard. He has a wider wave-band 
on which to receive them, and his good sets are 
second in tonal quality to none. 

Third: the absence of advertising from all pro- 
grams except a few from one station in Paris on 
Sunday evenings. The European rather shudders at 
the thought of advertising in his programs, though 
some organizations still have hopes he may change 
his tastes in this regard. This seems exceedingly 
unlikely and particularly so long as broadcasting, 
in those countries where advertising is permitted 
(France and Spain, notably France) , is the most dis- 
organized and chaotic of any part of Europe. 

Fourth: the systematic manner in which pro- 
grams are laid out in Great Britain, so as to provide 
variety and suit the tastes of all listeners. There is 
nothing in either the United States or Canada to 
compare with Great Britain in this respect. It is 
largely the result of the system of centralization 
which permits of a systematic division of the time 
for various types of programs, and also of the fact 
that the country is all within one time zone. 

Fifth: the systematic development of features 
which have a definite educational as well as enter- 
tainment value. During a brief stay in London 
I heard adaptations of Galsworthy's "Strife" and 
Conrad's "Romance." Each lasted two hours (too 
long for us here where one hour should be the 
maximum), but at that the former would have 
carried a large part of any American or Canadian 
audience with it. True, we have in America 
sketches, and occasionally good sketches, but no such 
serious attempt to do things of the better class is 
made as in Great Britain. 

Production methods for radio dramas in Great 
Britain, Germany and other European countries 
arc definitely ahead of those in America. It may 
be hard for some to conceive of New York being 
second to Europe in anything. In music it is not. 
It has anything money can buy- But in the produc- 
tion of radio drama and in educational broadcasting 
America is undoubtedly in second place. Devices in 
the synchronization of studios and the use of effects 
which arc not practical in this country have been 
developed and are constantly being brought to a 
higher pitch of perfection. 



March, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 9 




Ived Tfeibel 



The five above are the regular array of 
talent that passes in review with "Para- 
mount on Parade," Mondays, Wednesdays 
and Fridays at noon over WABC. They 
are HANS HANKE, concert pianist; 
MARION BRINN, personality singer, 
known by the sobriquet of "Soapbox 
Crooner"; FRED FEIBEL, whose organ 
selections always provide a delightful treat, 
and RUBY WARD, contralto, who plays 
her own accompaniments. VERNON 
"Bud" GRAY, of course, is the master of 
ceremonies who directs the parade. "Bud" 
is from Boston, where he was a favorite 
with that city's dial-twisters through the 
daily broadcasts he conducted for several 
years from the stages of the various 
theaters. 



"Paramount on Parade" harks back to the days of radio entertainment when infor- 
mality and spontaneity were the by-words. A popular feature is the two-minute chats 
given by GRAY pertaining to the idiosyncracies of the screen stars with whom he is per- 
sonally acquainted. 



VERNON DALHART, originator of the so-called hill-billy songs, and MISS 
ADELYN HOOD, his partner, costumed for their new twice-weekly broadcast over the 
Columbia chain. Dalhart, as Barbasol Ben, is getting a free manicure from Miss Hood, 





delya Hood 



V<2Kr\or\. <y oi kerb" 



who takes the part of Barbara, the manicurist. Supported by a real barber-shop quartet, 
the new Barbasol program presents old and new songs and stories Mondays and Thursdays 
at 8:15 p. m., E. S. T., on a nation-wide CBS chain. 



Not quite five weeks have passed since 
DR. HOWARD \V. HAGGARD, assistant 
professor of physiology at Yale University, 
went on the air for the Eastman Kodak 
Company. 

Talking on "Devils, Drugs and Doctors," 
Dr. Haggard brought forth something dif- 
ferent for radio audiences who tunc to him 
Sunday nights at 8 o'clock, over the Colum- 
bia Broadcasting System. His is an enthu- 
siastic history of the medical profession. 
A history that sparkles with lively stories 
and amusing incidents of the days when 
doctors knew less than your janitor about 
surgery or treatment of any kind of sick- 
ness. 

Few arc capable of giving such a scries 
... a series which will continue for three 
years, they say . . . for few arc as well 
known or experienced as the hale and 
hearty Dr. Haggard. 




'"'• ' 



The recently inaugurated scries of I. a Palin.i programs, known as "Daddy and Rollo," 
which arc heard over the Columbia network, Tuesday*, Wednesdays and Thursdays at 
7:45 p. m., E. S. T., arc written by J. P. M< I.VOY, whose humor appears in magazines, news- 
papers and in play and book form. 

The parts arc portrayed by NICK DAWSON, who was selected because his voice resembles 
that 01 the author, and young Donald Hughes, who is the same age as in the act. The 
latter, despite his comparative youth, is a veteran of both the stage and radio entertainments. 



Vi^elreiiy 



He has been through the dictionary from 
"aachen" to "zyzzle" thirtj five times, 
and knows all the words in between. 1 lis 
name is FRANK 11. VI2ETELLY, and he 
talks to you over the radio without using 
any words of more than two or three syl- 
lables if he can help it. without any ot the 
didactic manner you might expect, for 
he's had two doctorates conferred on him, 
and even without anj trace ol an Engish 
accent, though he was born of a wealth) 

I nglish I .innly. 

For the first eleven \c.us ol his lile lie 

could scarcel) see, and peeped M the world 

through bl.uk goggles with tiny holes 

punched in them. An operation improved 

his sight, but still lot several yean he was 
not allowed to read more than .1 lew Inns 
ol print .1 day. 

Then 1. inn- the step that carried him 
ultimately to his present position, He 

entered the family's publishing business. 

lie read voraciously for years, and then 
the firm was forced into bankruptcy by a 
prosecution i"i publishing obscene books. 
The "obscene" authors were Tolstoi, Zola, 
Gautier and Flaubert! 

In disgust Frank Vizctclly came to 
America. After two months, without get- 
ting a position, lie was about t o go to sea 
— again in disgust. Hut one list shot, he 
said. lie tried it, and he's been with the 

firm of Funk Be Wagnalls ever since. He 
has been dictionary compiler, proofreader 

— everything up to his present position of 
editor. To day he is the world's greatest 
authority on the written word. But he 
stands six feet and weighs around tvA-> 
hundred pounds, and looks anything but 
the bookworm. 



Page 10 



WHAT'S OX THE' AIR 



March, 1931 



KecioucJ Views &nd Keufews 

Chicago and New \/ork UMITIAl Editors ieU our 
readers, ekboui Radio J7cInos in their Areas 







I. WINDY CITY SIDELIGHTS 

By Joseph Ator. 
NE of the radio sensations of the past 



month broke when Russell Pratt, Ransom 
Sherman and Joe Rudolph, who had gained 
fame over WMAQ at Chicago as "The Three 
Doctors," suddenly threw up their chain con- 
tract as the "Three Bakers" (Flcischmann 
Yeast). In effect, the trio announced that not 
all the gold a network broadcast offered could 
buy their art. 

They refused to work from prepared scripts, 
maintaining that for them to become mere 
continuity readers would destroy the spon- 
taneity of their rough-and-tumble act with 
its burlesque "drammers" and ad lib comedy. 
There was merit in their argument, for they 
had won their reputation by an originality 
which would have been hard to maintain in 
previously prepared scripts. 

Anyway, they hiked back to Chicago and 
resumed operations as the "Three Doctors" on 
WMAQ, while Leo Reisman and a vocal trio, 
consisting of Gordon and Glenn Cross and Gib- 
son Nolan, arc carrying on the "Three Bakers" 
program. 

Radio studio gossip has it that everything 
went well until Pratt, Sherman and Rudolph 
went to New York for a personal appearance 
before the annual national convention of 
bakers. Those stolid worthies took in the 
hurly-burly act with no more than perfunc- 
tory applause, and at the close of the conven- 
tion the bakers' committee on broadcasting was 
reported to have suggested to the Fleischmann 
people that they had a lot of swell ideas to 
improve the "Three Bakers." It was right 
after that that the trio quit. 



Thousands of Chicago mothers thank Mar- 
shall Field & Co. for the Musical Clock pro- 
gram, a feature for the last two years, in which 
KYW has solved the problem of doing some- 
thing different with the morning broadcast of 
phonograph records. The Musical Clock runs 
every week-day morning from 7 to 9 o'clock. 
The time is announced at five-minute intervals, 
and mothers, to whom it is an effort to get 
their offspring out of bed and off to school 
on time, have found it a blessing. 

The program also gives weather reports and 
other information of that nature. 



S& 



Opera in English may not be such a howl- 
ing success, but WGN, at Chicago, has made 
a notable contribution to opera on the radio 
with its Manor House opera hour, every Sun- 
day from 7 to 8 p. M., C. S. T. A specially 
prepared continuity in English, done by Miss 
Jean Conovcr, presents the full plot of some 
well-known opera. The arias and choruses 
remain in the language in which the opera was 
written. 

Chicago has a huge population of German 
extraction— more even than Milwaukee — and 
so to many Chicagoans the Hungry Five, and 
old-fashioned "wiener band" on WGN, recalls 
days of beer gardens and of slightly discordant 
music on street corners. Interspersed with 
music of the kind that is so sour that it's good 
is the comedy of Hcrr Louie, the pompous 
band leader, played by Henry Mueller, and the 
Weasel, his pestiferous and dim-witted mu- 
sician, played by Llal Gilles. 

In common with most other newspapcr- 
owned stations, a number of WGN's programs 
tic in with the paper's features. Two of those 
are the Harold Teen Company, modeled after 
a Chicago Tribune comic strip portraying the 
sorrows and joys of a group of modern high- 
school lads .ind misses, and little Orphan Annie, 
also taken from a comic strip. They alter- 
nate at 5:45 p. m., C. S. T. 



' 



Ben Bcrnic's suave satire has put him in a 
class of his own among Chicago radio band 
leaders. You can't listen to his announcements 
long before realizing that behind his dulcet 
tones is a conscious, biting burlesque of some 



of the more saccharine of his fellow masters 
of ceremonies. He and his band arc on WBBM 
from 11:15 to 11:45 p. M„ C. S. T. They 
also play half -hour periods, starting at 9:30 
p. M., Wednesday; 8 p. M., Thursday and 
Sunday; 8:30 P. M., Friday, and 9 p. M., 
Saturday. Seekers after dance music in the 
wee small hours will find WBBM presenting 
various orchestras from 12 to 2 a. m. nightly. 



WMAQ, the Chicago Daily Neivs, is one of 
the stations* carrying on pioneering work in 
television, through an auxiliary short wave 
station W9XAP. From 8:15 to 8:30 P. M., 
every Tuesday, WMAQ and W9XAP unite in 
presenting various stage stars in radio and tele- 
vision, in co-operation with Radio-Keith-Or- 
pheum. 

One of the best religious programs origina- 
ting in Chicago is the Sunday Evening Club, 
which WMAQ broadcasts every Sunday at 
7:30 p. M., C. S. T. The club is a non-sec- 
tarian organization, originally founded to pro- 
vide evening religious services for guests at 
downtown hotels and strangers in the city. 

S. L. Huntley, cartoonist on the Daily News, 
is a "nut" on the ballads of the old South- 
west. He presents a program of them at 2 
p. M. every Tuesday and Thursday over 
WMAQ, offering an explanation of some of the 
cow-country colloquialisms along with the 
song. 



The prize newspaper-radio promotion fea- 
ture of the last few months has been the 
radio trials conducted by the Hearst newspapers 
in a number of cities. In Chicago, KYW and 
the Herahl-Examiner co-operated in staging 
"The Trial of Vivienne Ware" and "The Trial 
of Ellen McAntee," in which a prominent 
judge, a former State's attorney and well- 
known criminal practitioners took the radio 
parts of judge, prosecutor and defense at- 
torneys. 

A regular KYW feature from 6:30 to 7:00 
p. M. every Saturday is the March of Events 



program, in which some of the outstanding 
historical events described in the Herald- 
Examiner section of the same name on Sun- 
day are dramatized. 



Sara Ann McCabe, the Dainty Damosel of 
WIBO, is holding a semi-classical outpost in 
the midst of the present horde of crooners 
and blues singers on the radio. Her program 
(she is a soprano) presents such composers 
as Herbert, DeKoven and Grieg at 9:30 
p. M. every Wednesday. 

A fixed belief at WIBO is that the average 
announcer likes to hear himself much oftener 
than the patrons do. Miss McCabe's program, 
and that of the Music Box Review, in which 
Eric Segerquist conducts the WIBO symphony 
orchestra in a classical and semi-classical pro- 
gram, run uninterrupted after the opening 
announcement. The Music Box goes on the 
air at 10 p. M., C. S. T., an average of four 
nights a week, depending upon possible con- 
flicts with chain and commercial programs. 



5H 



A famous artist of the opera or concert 
world appears weekly with an orchestra in the 
Hydrox program at 9 p. M. Thursday over 
WMAQ. 

The same station has been one of the most 
active in popularizing dramatic programs. One 
of these is the Thomas J. Webb Famous Signers 
program at 8:30 p. M. Monday. The signing 
of some famous document of history is re- 
enacted. 



After a brief trip to the Pacific Coast, 
Paul Whiteman and his orchestra have re- 
turned to Chicago and to their broadcasts 
over WBBM. In addition to their appearances 
earlier in the evenings, they are on the air from 
midnight every Sunday to 3 A. M. in the 
WBBM Nutty Club, whose listener-members 
are admitted with the password of "Cuckoooo." 



II. NOVEL NEW YORK OFFERINGS 



By Charles 

EULAH HACKENGER, contralto, recent- 
ly came from the middle West after 
appearances with the St. Louis Civic and the 
Cincinnati Opera Companies, to assist as solo- 
ist on the regular Thursday evening broadcast 
of the Bamberger Little Symphony Orchestra. 
Miss Hackenger is becoming widely known 
through the richness and masterly control of 
her voice, and its radio presentation is not a 
whit diminished from that pleasing tone of- 
fering that is so characteristic of her theatrical 
work. This concert, with various guest art- 
ists from throughout the country, is an inter- 
esting feature of WOR, Newark, on Thurs- 
day evenings at eight o'clock, Eastern Stand- 
ard Time. 



The Club Abby in New York loans a very 
interesting artist to WMCA, periodically, in 
the person of Tamara, the charming Russian 
Gipsy Singer. 

:'- 

Genial Jack Rcid, speaking of Betty Allen 
of the piano team of Elizabeth Allen and 
Ernest J. Cafiso, heard on WGBS, New York, 
on Saturday afternoons at various hours, said 
that she was "im-posing." Jack simply meant 
that she was one of the most beautiful of 
America's Artists' Models. So it can not be 
said that Betty's personality is at her finger- 
tips. 



The Radio Rodeo has taken New York 
radio fans and the listeners to New York 
stations by storm. Opening like a peal of 
thunder, at the end of January, under the 
genial "King Solomon ot the Air," Cliff Clif- 
ton, of Village Inn Nut Club Fame, the Rodeo 
has been presenting two-hour nightly broad- 



S. Strong. 

casts after midnight, Eastern Standard Time, 
and presents a variety that is a whale of a 
fish for DX fans to angle after. The Radio 
Rodeo is the rendezvous of all radio stars 
from all stations, who present impromptu 
offerings on the spur of the moment. The 
program goes out over WHN, WPAP, WGBS 
and WMCA, all in New York. 



The Ludwig Baumann Broadcasts on Sun- 
day evenings at nine o'clock, Eastern Standard 
Time, arc continuing to broadcast a con- 
sistently interesting and entertaining popular 
musical offering. Merle Johnston's orchestra 
and Schutt & Cornell, the piano magicians, 
have been adding delight to this offering from 
WOR, Newark. 



Boxing and wrestling fans can have a great 
deal of excitement added to their radio log 
by tuning in on Jack Reid and Sam Taub at 
Ridgewood Grove and Madison Square, New- 
York, ovor WGBS, on Saturdays from 9:30 
to 10:30 p. m., E. S. T., and on Monday at 
the same hour. When the action begins to 
lag, Rcid and Taub can be counted upon to 
stage a little battle of their own to fill in. 



Many of the children who tunc in on 
Captain Joe over WTO I in New York may 
be interested to learn the extent of his sailor 
aspirations. During his career he joined the 
crew of an oil tanker as third cook. The 
first day out he accidentally locked the steward 
in the icebox. The second day the kettle of 
boiling soup spilled all over him. The third 
day the vessel went on the rocks off Bermuda, 



and in swimming ashore he contracted double 
pneumonia. 



Bill Mclia, WMCA's interesting Night Club 
Announcer, who, through his job, knows 
every gunman and racketeer in the city, claims 
he never actually saw a gun drawn or any 
one shot. Nice of the boys, isn't it? 



Charley Wilson, the genial New Zealand 
lecturer and journalist, has come something 
like eleven thousand miles, or more, to pre- 
sent his interesting talks on "Mystery and 
Magic of the Pacific," on Sunday mornings 
at 11:30 o'clock, E. S. T. His offering over 
WOR, Newark, covers those little known 
groups of the Fiji Islands, New Guinea and 
the islands of Oceania from Hawaii to Well- 
ington. His material on the Megalithic re- 
mains on the island of Yap was of especial 
interest, and, if we had known of it before, 
perhaps we might have fought a little harder 
for the old place. Charley founded six 
papers, and is the author of a history of 
New Zealand cntited "The Empire's Junior 
Partner." That's lending King George a hand. 



When Perry Charles, of Station WHN, New 
York, opened his Gridiron Club of the Air, a 
Radio Replica of the interesting mutual 
"knocking" society of Washington, Charley 
Butterfield, the radio editor of the Associated 
Press, said that he saw it as the first big step 
in real fellowship among those behind the 
microphones who are all brothers and sisters 
under the skin, or is it the din? It depends 
on your loud speaker. 

The line-up for one of these Gridiron meet- 
ings, heard every other Sunday night on the 
Radio Rodeo two hours after midnight, is as 
follows: The victim sits around and here and 
there his best friends get up and give him a 
fine roasting for three minutes each. The 
"roasted" then has six minutes of comedy 
comeback in which to restore quiet to the 
gravy. Uncle Nick Kenny, the popular radio 
editor of the Daily Mirror, was the first vic- 
tim, and he had a formidable array against 
him, including such well-known names as Ted 
Elusing, popular CBS announcer; Norman 
Brokenshire; Johnny Johnstone of NBC; Guy 
Lombardo, of the Royal Canadians; Henry 
Burbig, the dialectician; Jack Fater, of the 
New York Telegram; Lou Reid, of the New 
York American; Lewis Reid, dean of the 
announcing staff of WOR, Newark; Leo T. 
Heatley, the columnist; Johnny Skinner, of 
the Brooklyn Daily Eagle; Stewart Eggleston, 
of CBS, and Tom Noonan, the Bishop of 
Chinatown. 

Heywood Broun, the would-be journalistic 
Congressman or Congressional columnist (as 
you will), went on the pan on February 22, 
and Mark Hellingcr and Bugs Bacr will pro- 
vide the sizzle on March S and March 22, 
respectively, if not respectfully. 



An uplifting argument was provided by the 
technical staff of WMCA when they were 
commissioned to dynamite the old power-house 
in Hoboken after the installation of the new 
1000-watt transmitter had been hooked up 
recently. The dynamiters were a bit ama- 
teurish, and besides the old power-house, the 
antenna and a few nice tool-houses climbed 
into the sky, in bits, as well. If you happened 
to be on that wave length and heard anything 
that sounded like Manila Bay, that was what 
it was. 

The other day wc ran across Anthony Stan- 
ford, chief announcer of WGBS, and who did 
we recognize, by Jove, but Abie, of Abie's 
Irish Rose, and if that isn't nation-wide news, 
what else is? I'll bet people know Stanford 
as Abie, that only know Anne Nichols as 
the mother of a bunch of carfares. Tony 
has been with WGBS now for two years, and 
his theatrical background has added greatly 
to his ability to fit in not only at WGBS, but 
as a link on the chain stations. 



:" 



Marcia W'jllach came within our course the 
other day, and when we had recovered from 
the engaging attraction of her beautiful con- 
tralto voice, we learned that WBBC, WGBS 
lend her talents to the radio audience. 



March, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 11 




mddmi 

Srancisillda 



Each Wednesday at 7:30 P. M., and each 
Friday at 7:15 p. M., E. S. T., MADAME 
ALDA and FRANK LA FORGE present a 
program based on listeners' requests over 
WJZ and associates. No announcer is used, 
informal discourses between Madame Alda 
and La Forge serving to keep the listeners 
informed. 

MAURICE CHEVALIER, famed come- 
dian of the French stage and motion-picture 
star, will continue to be featured on the 
Chase and Sanborn programs (Sunday eve- 
nings at 8:30 over WEAF and associates) 
for twenty-six weeks. We wonder if he is 
thinking of earlier days when he lost his 
$3 a week job painting faces of dolls in a 
toy factory because he persisted in making 
them up to represent chorus girls. 



tforteme 
jfcagland 



RAY PERKINS, prince of pineapples, is 
shown teaching HORTENSE RAGLAND, 
radio and vaudeville star, the art of wise- 
cracking via the air. Perkins is the sun-ray 
that is heard in Songs and Chatter Thurs- 
day and Friday mornings at 10:00, E. S. T., 
over a NBC-WJZ network. 




<\ John U fibber 

J MtvrieeCheyalier 
J CeoMcClelland 




£&7e 

yimmiej'/aai/ion 
wermettjgrson 




Led by BENNETT LARSON, formerly the 
popular "Uncle Ben" of KSL, Salt Lake City, 
J1MMIE McCALLION and a capable cast of 
child performers are now presenting the 
"Jolly Junkctccrs," a program for children, 
each Wednesday and Saturday afternoon at 
5:15 E. S. T., over WJZ. 

LITTLE JIMMIE McCALLION is a veteran 
of stage and microphone. During the past few 
years he has played in almost a dozen produc- 
tions on Broadway, several movies and has 
been prominently identified with almost every 
juvenile program on NBC air lanes. He is 
especially well remembered for his role of 
"Sam" in Booth Tarkington's Penrod scries, 
broadcast during the summer ol 1930. 




Moonshine and 
rfonej/fi/ckle 



JteeleJawison 



No feature in popular favor has suf- 
fered more changes of time and temporary 
removals from the air than "Moonshine and 
Honeysuckle," LULA VOl I Ml R-'S series 
of dramatic sketches of love and clan war- 
fare in the Southern mountains. At this 
writing it is scheduled for Sundays at 2:00 
p. m.j over WEAF and associates. The cast 
(left to right) is as follows: CLAUDE 
COOPER, ANN HSTNIR. GERALD 
STOPP (NBC Production Manager), LULA 
VOl I MIR. [EANNIE BIGG. JOHN MIL- 
TON. LOUIS MASON; (seated) ANN 
SUTHERLAND and SARA IIAIMN. 



The favorite melodies "I 1 generation ago 
arc modernized and brought up to date by 
those who compose the I [eel I lugger program 
heard SuihI.iv nights .it 10:15 through an ex- 
tensive NIK' network. AIAVYN E. W. BACH, 
1930 American Academy of Arts and Letters 
diction award winner, presents each program. 

A sparkling orchestra, directed by ROBERT 
ARMBRUSTER, and quartet composed of 
NORMAN PRICE and STEELE JAMISON, 
tenors; EDWARD WOI.TER, baritone, and 
EARL WALDO, bass, are featured. 



7/lwyrWach 



Page 12 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



Jcckfno^ Jiirou^ii ihe ^Jiudw&ccye 




Bobbc Dcane, NBC's petite actress, whose 
child impersonations are famous up and down 
the Pacific Coast, missed a program for the 
first time in her life on a recent Tuesday 
night, when she did not appear in "Memory- 
Lane." 

An automobile accident, which almost cost 
Bobbe her life, was the reason. A surgeon 
spent exactly an hour and a half sewing up 
the deep wounds in her mouth and limbs 
following the accident. Only once did she 
interrupt while he used the needle in her 
mouth, which was badly cut. 

"What's your name?" she demanded. 

"Brown," said the doctor. 

"Oh," said Bobbc, true comedian. "I 
thought it was Singer, the way you sew!" 



JSf 



Comedy and tragedy arc often closely re- 
lated. And Herr Louie and the Weasel, two 
of the greatest comedians on the air and on 
the stage, know this to be true. The two, 
in real life Henry Moellcr and Hal Gilles, 
who are heard from WGN with the funny, 
"lettlc German band" each night, except Sun- 
day, 10:20 to 10:30, on Sunday night, Jan- 
uary 4, were just about to go on the stage 
of the Central Park Theater in the west part 
of Chicago, when three shots were fired. 
Gilles rushed out the back stage door and 
almost stumbled over the form of a dying 
man. Gilles went back into the theater. He 
and Moeller went through their act, but they 
both admit that they never acted such a per- 
formance in all their life. 



When Vernon Dalhart, hill-billy tenor of 
Barbasol programs on WABC, wanted to get 
into the recording business he decided the 
thing to do was to see Thomas A. Edison. 
Several dozen secretaries, officials, sub-officials 
and office boys having been convinced that no 
crime was intended, he got by — warned not 
to take up more than five minutes of the in- 
ventor's time. 

He first saw Ldison at 2 p. M. At 4:20 he 
left the inventor's office. He'd gone halfway 
through his repertoire and persuaded Edison 
that he was worth a try-out for recordings. 
Later, millions of discs of "The Prisoner's 
Song" were sold. 



Lowell (Literary Dines! ) Thomas keeps 
five secretaries busy typing out answers to his 
fan mail, which he personally dictates. Even 
signing the letters is a tremendous task, and 
to keep abreast of the flood of correspondence 
he brings a small suitcase to WABC's studios 
filled with outgoing letters. Whenever he has 
a spare moment he opens the case and signs 
them. 



Harry Swan, who can, and docs, broadcast 
fifteen different dialects over the WABC 
Columbia network proves that accent is not 
purely vocal. A photographer assigned to 
snap him at the microphone complained that 
he could not pose him in action. 

"Why not pose me in dialect?" Harry asked. 

"Whaddaya mean, in dialect?" 

"Just what I say," Harry retorted, making 
a grimace. "What dialect is this?" 

"Italian," said the cameraman. 

"And this — and this — ?" Swan continued. 

The photographer recognized each of the 
fifteen characters. 





Denny Lynch, one-half of the team of 
Dick and Denny, the new harmony pair heard 
each Monday at 4 p. M., E. S. T., over the 
Columbia network, comes from a family of 
preachers — four generations of them. Denny 
was to have been the fifth. Instead, he ran 
away from home at the age of fifteen and 
joined a small concert company. Denny looked 
after the baggage of the entire company, 
and held a guitar in his lap, for effect only, 
during the opening and closing of the show. 
His salary was $20 a week. When he learned 
to play a few chords on the instrument his 
pay was boosted to $2 5 a week. 



Freddie Rich, WABC conductor, once re- 
ceived a letter and a ten-dollar check from 
an appreciative fan in Doylestown, Pa. He 
returned the check, 
but in a few days 
the fan sent it back, 
demanding that he 
cash it. 

A year later, Rich, 
with the check still 
uncashed, was ar- 
rested for speeding 
in Pennsylvania, and 
taken to a court in 
Doylestown. When 
the magistrate asked 
him if he knew any 
one in the town. Rich 
remembered his gener- 
ous admirer. Phoning the latter, the magis- 
trate asked if Mr. Freddie Rich was a friend 
of his. 

"Is he a friend of mine?" the Doylestown 
man shouted. "I'll say he is! I'll be right 
over." 

Through the unexpected influence Rich was 
let off without a fine. But the check, for 



"Is there a doctor in the house?" 

There was. A bewhiskered gentleman grave- 
ly arose, saying: 

"I am a doctor." 

The drunk leered amiably. "Hello, Doc," 
he said and sat down. 



More than two hundred manufacturers of 
as many products are using the NBC net- 
work as a medium for building good will 
for their wares. And incidentally furnish- 
ing radio listeners with almost as many 
varieties of broadcast entertainment as there 
are manufacturers. 



NBC maintains a merchandising division, 
in charge of Frank Silvernail, the sole func- 
tion of which is to 
persuade program 
sponsors to advertise 
their broadcast in 
newspapers and mag- 
azines over the 
country. 




"Why did you leave your last position in 
the KOD studios?" 

"There was no future in it." 

"Why?" 

"The chief announcer was already married." 



: >s 



some reason, hasn't yet been cashed. 



A trip to Europe is the one ambition, at the 
moment, of Lucille Wall, known to radio 
listeners for her dramatizations in the Adven- 
tures of Polly Preston and as the "Love Story 
Girl" in Collier's Hour. If Lucille must go, 
the Graf Zeppelin should be pressed into 
service for her, so that she might hurry back 
to us. 

"I'm Dancing with Tears in My Eyes" must 
have been inspired by John S. Young. He's 
regarded as an expert dancer now; but this 
NBC announcer once 
hated dancing lessons 
so heartily that he 
burst into tears every 
time an orchestra 
played the Missouri 
Waltz. 




Countess Olga Mc- 
dolago Albani, so- 
prano heard in many 
jNBC programs, is 
among the most beau- 
tiful microphone art- 
ists. Hardly a month 
bring a renewed oiler 
producers. 



"Lay down, pup: 
new studio attache. 
I say." 

"You'll have to 
declared a page. ' 



passes 
from 



that docs not 
motion-picture 



Collecting walking- 
sticks is one of the 
hobbies of Rein aid 
Werrenrath, NBC vo- 
cal consul. He claims 
to have obtained a 
cane in every town in which he sang a con- 
cert. Werrenrath might be said to be prepar- 
ing for a ripe old age. 



sg 



Lady Radio Artist — Well, here's a dollar 
for you, my poor man. 

Tramp — A dollar? Lord bless you, ladyl 
If ever there was a fallen angel, it's you. 



Lois Bennett, heard regularly in the Arm- 
strong Quaker program, has signed an exclu- 
sive contract with NBC. Since the middle of 
January the soprano has been dividing her 
time between the New York studios and vari- 
ous cities, appearing in the latter generally in 
connection with automobile shows. 



That "accidents will happen," even in the 
best regulated broadcasting studios, is well 
manifest at Colum- 
bia. The force must 
be alert to fill in the 
breach without hesi- 
tancy. 

For example, Aud- 
rey Marsh had her 
music-stand collapse 
during a broadcast; 
the resultant crash 
was muffled by the 
percussion instru- 
ments, and, as her 
music fell "sunny 
side up," Miss Marsh 
continued singing, 
music-rack, 
moment" was when the 
Dr. Thatcher Clark's 



*^? 



Sf\W / 



lay down!" 
'Good doggii 



ordered the 
— lay down. 



say 'Lie 
That's a 



down,' 
Boston 



Mister,' 
terrier.' 



Reinald Werrenrath 

hours a clay preparing 

hearsing 



often works 
material for, 



eighteen 
and re- 



the National Oratorio which he 
directs for NBC each Sunday afternoon. The 
famed baritone also is heard on the Camel 
Pleasure Hour every Wednesday night, .liui is 
keeping up his concert work. 



■:• 



An alcoholically oversubscribed gentleman 
wandered into Roxy's recently. During the 
pause in the program, just as the orchestra 
conductor called the musicians to attention for 
the overture, the drunk got to his feet and 
excitedly called out: 



with the floor as 

Another "dark 
pianist assigned for 
French lessons failed to appear; George Bcuch- 
Icr, announcer, brought his expert piano tech- 
nique into play. 

Then, there is diminutive Marion Brinn, 
star of Paramount on Parade, who labors under 
the sobriquet of "The Soapbox Crooner." It 
was at her first broadcast that an emergency 
call sounded for a platform for her. The first 
available object proved a soapbox. 



Both Arcadic Birkcnholz and Godfrey Lud- 
low, violinists heard regularly on NBC net- 
works, possess valuable violins. Ludlow's 
was priced at $45,000, while Birkcnholz's 
favorite musical instrument is rated at only 
1 (cw thousand less. 



I 




si 




Judge Watt — Congratulate me, dear, I 
have been reappointed. 
Wife— Honestly! 
Judge Watt— Shh! 



Frank Vagnoni, violinist, heard in many 
NBC programs, and director of several broad- 
casting orchestras, was recently robbed of a 
violin which he had purchased only a short 
while before for $3,000. 



rib! 



lornble noise comes 



from 



Friend- — What 
that radio set! 

Radio Fan — Well, I guess you would make 
just as bad a noise if you were coming out 
of ether.- — Everybody's Magazine. 



Bert Lown, whose orchestra broadcasts reg- 
ularly over the Columbia network, has a small 
movie camera and carries it about with him 
constantly. Because he seldom finds time to 
use it except when he is riding about in a 
taxi, he now finds himself with an enormous 
collection of film showing the backs of cab 
drivers. 



Victor Kolar, conductor of the Detroit Sym- 
phony Orchestra during the Graham-Paige 
hour on the Columbia network, once shared 
a shabbily furnished room in New York with 
Rudolph Friml, composer, and Ottocar Bar- 
tik, ballet master of the Metropolitan. Kolar 
and Friml had been students together at the 
Conservatory in Prague. The combined in- 
come of the trio was just enough to buy their 
chief item of diet — boiled rice. 



Studio Director — Didn't ya hear me yell for 
you to stop? 

Girl Visitor — No, sir. 

Studio Director — Didn't ya hear mc whistle? 

Girl Visitor — No, sir. 

Studio Director — Didn't ya sec mc signal? 

Girl Visitor — No, sir. 

Studio Director — Well, I guess I might as 
well go on home. I don't seem to be doing 
much good around here. 



The traditional story of the Chinese witness 
who, in court, required five minutes to enun- 
ciate a flood of his native language, translated 
by the interpreter as "He says 'No,' " had its 
full force brought home to H. C. Conncttc, 
NBC continuity writer, the other day. In 
"Filial Piety," which will be presented in 
the NBC Drama Hour, January 17, Conncttc 
had to write speeches in English which would 
be spoken in Chinese by Dr. Margaret Chung, 
well-known San Francisco physician, who has 
agreed to appear in the play as the Chinese 
mother. 

Dr. Chung was obliged to translate her 
speeches into the Cantonese dialect, and the 
length of the translation presented a pretty 
problem for their author. By working to- 
gether, however, he and Dr. Chung managed 
to revise the original script and change the 
mother's remarks into sentences which wouldn't 
require five minutes of Chinese dialect apiece. 
Next time he introduces a foreign language 
into a play, Conncttc will pick something 
simple, like Sanskrit. 




March, 193 1 



.WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 13 



cJosepk H. 
Jl&ckey 





&d\tarcl<J). 



cRob 



These good-looking portraits represent all but one of the announcers 
of WRVA, Richmond, Va. WALTER R. BISHOP, six feet, two, 
and a bachelor, a native Virginian, is program director. In addition 
to his duties as chief announcer, J. ROBERT BEADLES is conductor 
of the Edge-worth Concert Orchestra and organist and choir director 
of one of Richmond's leading churches. EDWARD D. NAFF is 
musical director. He has had wide experience as soloist and recitalist, 
and as a teacher of music in university music departments. GEORGE 
F. BECK, Jr., came to WRVA from WTAR. He is not only a popular 
announcer, but director of a large dance orchestra and juvenile lead 
in many dramatic offerings over WRVA. PHILIP N. BINFORD, 
locally known as "Pat," has identified himself with such programs as 

Old Times' Midnight Jollification and the Corn Cob Pipe 
Club. JOSEPH H. MACKAY came to radio from the stage. 
His hold on the WRVA audience was won as an entertainer 
as well as announcer. GEORGE W. HUNTER, Jr., gave up 
a musical career because of his interest in technical phases 
of radio. He has been at WRVA since 1925, handling 
remote control pick-ups. 

WRVA offers one peculiarly distinctive program in its 
"Dixie Spiritual Singers," heard each Monday at 10:30 p. M., 
E. S. T. These boys were all recruited from Richmond 
tobacco factories. They sing genuine negro folk songs in 
genuine negro fashion. 




Ulter R 



PatDmford 



J)ixie (Spiritual c/inoenr 



Members of the "Grand Ol' Opry," at WSM, 
Nashville, Tcnn., pause long enough for a photog- 
rapher to take a "shot" of the entire outfit. This 
feature has been presented at WSM each Saturday 
night for over five years and draws telegrams and 
mail in abundance. The players include the Pickard 
Family, now on NBC; Dr. Humphrey Bate and his 
"Possum Hunters," Paul Warmack and his "Gully 
Jumpers," the "Fruit Jar Drinkers," Cook Brothers, 
Ed Poplin and his band, and Theron Hale with his 
two daughters. George Hay, "The Solemn Ol' 
Judge," instigator of the plot, so to speak, is shown 
at the extreme right, with Harry Stone, his partner 
in crime, next to him. 





Q ra.net 01 ' Opry 



Q/toWe TA.rh.ily 



The principal member of the world's only two-piano team of its kind is 
VELMA STOWE, four-months-old daughter of Arthur W. "Tiny" Stowc, 
announcer and maestro of the late-night programs from KSTP, and VELMA 
DEAN STOWE, known nationally as the Southern Crooner of radio, and for 
her work in the WLS Showboat. "Tiny" played tackle on the Centre College 
football team led by Bo. McMillan. Mrs. Stowc entertains during the "Frolic 
of the Dodos" from KSTP every Monday at midnight. 




Among the comedy sensations ol the 

air during the past yeai on an indi 

vidu.il station are the "Two Professors" 

- "Prof." DON M< Mil l . B.V.D., 

X.Y.2., O.K. MX., and "Prof." VAN 

11 I MING, P.D.Q., B.P.O.E., I'.N.T.. 

i i. i in ed in i i hai a< tci isi ic 

pose, l hese two nutty 

masters "i nonsense hold 

fori li ever) I ridaj eveninj 

.11 7 o'cloi k over SI at ion 

\\ HAS. Louisville, Ky., and 
number among their "stu- 
dents" fans the country 
over. 

n 



Yroressors 

(T-NeilLnd 

V6.r)FI<?mir« 



Page 14 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



March. 1931 



Jookfno^ fiirouqj^ khe. ^yhrdfoscope 



Norman Brokenshirc will not be on the air 
again until March 13, when The Radio Follies 
resume on CBS. He's South now making 
"yellies." 



Lois Bennett, soprano of the Armstrong 
Quakers and other NBC programs, is the wife 
of a vice-president of the Fada Radio cor- 
poration — and the mother of two children. 



Elizabeth Lennox is among the few con- 
traltos under contract to NBC who is married. 
Among the single ones arc Mary Hopple, Wel- 
come Lewis, Vee Lawnhurst and Leslie Frick. 



Individuals high-lighted by Edwin Alger 
in NBC's Who's Behind the Name programs 
arc personally interviewed by Alger before each 
broadcast. Alger is a Washington newspaper- 
man. 



Mother — What made you stay so late with 
that radio announcer? Have a flat tire? 

Daughter (dreamily) — No, Mother, I'd 
hardly call him that! 



Olga Scrlis, leader of the Parnassus Trio, 
heard daily in NBC programs, longs for real 
winter weather so she can take snow baths, 
as she believes snow water is ideal for the com- 
plexion. No need for excitement — she does 
not go out into it. 



On every week-day, excepting Saturday, you 
can tune in on WHAS, Louisville, Ky., be- 
tween 12:45 and 1:00 p. M., C. S. T., and 
hear an educational program broadcast by 
the University of Kentucky. These programs 
for March deal with Agriculture, Commerce 
and Politics. 

A winsome widow who, aside from being 
hopelessly simple, is simply hopeless, writes 
the Radio Press that she has loved and lost 
three husbands — all named William. "Docs 
this," she wails, "signify anything?" 

"Certainly does," assured the worldly editor. 
"It means that you've had the Willies." 



J 



Phil Cook, NBC's Quaker-Aunt Jemima 
Man, dialectician and one-man show, is flirt- 
ing with vaudeville engagements since he 
abandoned his early morning broadcasts. The 
daily evening programs, for which he also 
prepares all the material, do not keep him 
busy enough to make him happy. 



Walter IN. Linthicum, baritone soloist and 
announcer at WBAL, began his musical career 
at the age of fifteen, when he joined his High 
School Glee Club. When not appearing be- 
fore WBAL's microphone, or as soloist in 
church, Mr. Linthicum follows his profession 
— that of teacher in one of Baltimore's public 
schools. 



Frank Wincgar, whose orchestra is heard 
regularly over WABC from the Village Barn, 
was a busy boy during his undergraduate 
days ,11 U. of P. He was coxswain of the 
varsity crew, rope-climbing champion, art 
editor of the Punch Bowl magazine, winner 
of the Mask and Wig dramatic trophy, star 
golf-player and an able high diver. He also 
won several rewards in architectural competi- 
tions. 

An intaglio ring sent to Announcer George 
Beuchler at WABC by an anonymous admirer 
is said to be 1,100 years old. Carved in its 
stone is the head of a man and a Greek in- 
scription, which, read backwards, constitutes 
an archaic spelling of the name "Damocles." 
Antiquarians to whom Beuchler has taken 
the ring declare that the reversed spelling in- 
dicates its use as a seal. 




Howard Chandler Christy, American artist, 
presented Graham McNamee, ace of the NBC 
announcers, with a portrait for Christmas. 
Christy is said to have worked several weeks 
on the picture, which McNamee regards as 
the best ever painted of him. 



Mrs. Mack — I'm bothered with a little wart 
that I'd like to have removed. 

Dr. Jones — The divorce lawyer is at the 
second door to your left. 



Dr. Klein, whose voice is familiar to radio 
listeners through his weekly "World's Busi- 
ness" talks over the Columbia chain, reports 
that when he arrived in Cairo during a 
recent extensive tour, a number of persons 
already knew of him through his weekly broad- 
casts, which, they told him, arc heard reg- 
ularly in Egypt through the medium of 
Columbia's New York short-wave station 
W2XE. 



The 50,000-watt transmitter of the Hart- 
ford station, WTIC, is located on a densely 
wooded mountain, ten miles from the city, and 
technicians stationed at the plant have noticed 
that several deer come out of their sylvan 
haunts early each morning to hear the open- 
ing programs. Fred Wade, WTIC announcer, 
has been the butt of many jibes from the 
engineers, who maintain that every time the 
animals hear Fred's voice they are positively 
enraptured. 



Sam Lloyd, the puzzle king who gives out 
brain-teasers over WABC in the Central Sav- 
ings program, says nobody need be ashamed 
of being addicted to puzzles. Among their 
fans he counts Theodore Roosevelt, Edison 
and P. T. Barnum. A little further back in 
history he finds Newton, Huxley and Herschel, 
Byron, Macaulay, Longfellow and Edgar 
Allan Poe. Lloyd declares that, as a rule, 
the successful man or woman is the one who 
is best at solving puzzles. 



Nine little hot dogs 

Sizzlin' on a plate, 
In came the studio staff 

And then they were ate. 

— Pure Oil News 



Florric Bishop Bowering, director of "The 
Mixing Bowl," the radio household service 
broadcast from WTIC, contends that this 
machine age is a great thing for most people, 
but some of them arc having a tough time 
keeping up with it. She cites the case of the 
woman who wanted to know where she could 
buy the little ice-cubes to put in her electric 
refrigerator. And the case of the woman who, 
not knowing the function of the dustbag on 
her vacuum cleaner, thought the dust was 
carried away through the electric cord, be- 
ing consumed by the electricity en route. And 
the case of the housewife who called her elec- 
tric washing-machine a fake because the wash 
was just as dirty at the end of two hours as 
it had been when she put it in the machine. 
On interrogation she admitted she hadn't put 
water in the tub because she thought the 
electricity did the cleaning. 






Providing "atmosphere" for the scries of 
Old World programs which arc being presented 
in S and W Mellow 'd Melodies, keeps L. Scott 
Perkins, NCB Pacific Coast producer, busy. 
lie recently searched San Francisco to find a 
real Austrian zither-player for the Viennese 
presentation. Then he had to turn around and 
look for a balalaika artist for the Russian 
program, and some Chinese musicians for the 



Oriental one. Perkins' chief worry now is 
what's going to happen when he gets into the 
Balkans, and has to go out on a still hunt 
for come one who can play the guzla. 



Microtia — I'll tell you something if you'll 
promise to keep your mouth shut. 
Penelope — What is it? I will. 
Microbia — You've got halitosis. 



When Gunnar Johansen was a little boy in 
Copenhagen, a serious, anxious teacher called 
upon his father one day. 

"He won't learn his lessons," she told the 
elder Johansen. "What in the world is going 
to become of him?" 

Before the next year was over she had her 
answer. The little boy who wouldn't learn 
his lessons was touring Denmark at the age 
of thirteen, and by the time he was fourteen 
had earned enough money to take him to Ber- 
lin to continue his musical studies. 

All of which ought to point some kind of 
moral, but Gunnar, now an NBC artist, whose 
Sunday piano recitals from the National Broad- 
casting Company's San Francisco studios arc 
looked forward to with eagerness by thousands 
of radio hearers, admits he can't find it. 



When the telephone rang at Columbia the 
other night the operator was told, "This is 
the Grand Duchess." An awsome effect was 
produced both on the operator and the page- 
boy dispatched to find Alexander Woollcott, 
who had just finished his Tuesday night Early 
Bookworm broadcast. The titled voice be- 



longed to the Grand Duchess Marie of Russia, 
whose latest book had just been reviewed by 
Woollcott. 

At the close of his broadcast Woollcott 
called upon his audience to toast the Grand 
Duchess Marie of Russia and the United States. 
It was this gallant tribute, heard over WABC, 
that prompted the call. 

Another telephone call was received in the 
announcers' room at WABC several days ago: 

"May I speak to the dean of announcers?" 
asked the caller. 

The announcers were in a quandary. Each 
with becoming modesty, hesitated to pick up 
the receiver. Finally one stepped up to the 
phone and said, "This is he." 

It was Louis Dean, one of Columbia's new- 
est announcers. 



Immediately following a recent astrological 
hour over WHK, Columbia's Cleveland sta- 
tion, a feminine voice came over the phone 
in this fashion: 

"Could I speak to Evangeline Adams, 
please?" 

Operator — "We're sorry, but you have been 
listening to a Columbia program." 

"Then, Evangeline Adams doesn't live in 
Cleveland?" 

"No, she broadcasts from New York." 

"That's a shame. I wanted to ask her 
whether to-morrow would be a good day to 
get a permanent." 



NBC Elevator Girl — Here you are; sixth 
floor. Sonny. 

Piqued Male Passenger — What you mean, 
"Sonny"? You're not my mother! 

NBC Elevator Girl— Yes? Well I brought 
you up, didn't I? 




Sjrft Spcffe 




IF you like your bloodshed piping hot, let 
me recommend to you the antics of the 
amateur boxers. There, now, is a sport ap- 
proaching at times the lusty mayhem of the 
old gladiators. 

Alexander, Ca;sar, or whoever it was, who 
first put that wisecrack in the tactics manual 
to the effect that the best defense is a good 
offense, probably thought it up after seeing 
a couple of the champions of antiquity slic- 
ing up each other's ears with the cesti, all 
in the interest of good, clean, amateur sport. 

The modern amateur fighter has improved 
on the old tactical maxim. Not only his 
best, but often his only, defense is a lusty, 
wild-eyed offensive. The cream of these 
fighters is gathered each year in the New 
York and Chicago areas for the Golden Gloves 
tournament. Semi-final and final bouts, cul- 
minating in an intercity tournament, will 
be broadcast this month by station WGN. 

On March 2, 3 and 4 WGN will go on 
the air at 10:30 p. M., C. S. T., for the semi- 
final bouts between the Chicago boxers and 
those from other cities in that area. The 
broadcasts of the Chicago finals on March 1 1 
will start at 8 p. M. The intercity matches 
are held this year at the Madison Square Gar- 
den in New York on March 30. WGN will 
also report them, beginning at 8 p. m., C. S. T. 

The action, you may be sure, will put the 
lackadaisical fellows who appear these days 
in the professional ring to shame. The heavy- 
weight finals in a Golden Glove tourney 
several years ago serve as a good illustration. 

The opponents were a Mr. McGrath, one of 
Knute Rockne's minor footballers at Notre 
Dame, and a Mr. I loffman, who was a cornfed 
fellow from Bloomington, 111. Mr. McGrath 
rather fancied himself a boxer. Mtf Hoff- 
man had no illusions. He opened hostilities 
with a wild swing which whistled two feet 
from Mr. McGrath, as the latter sidestepped. 



,4r^ 




Mr. Hoffman was not discouraged. He 
reached far behind him, as if to scratch some 
remote portion of his anatomy. The resulting 
swing ended a ten-foot arc on the jaw of 
Mr. McGrath. The latter was game. He 
came up glassy-eyed on a count of nine. Mr. 
Hoffman measured him carefully and loosed 
another overhand swing, which, after nearly 
slaying the referee, again hit Mr. McGrath 
on the chin. 

That unfortunate fellow promptly assumed 
the position of an ostrich in the ring, his 
nose buried in the canvas and his ponderous 
rear quarters elevated. But Irish blood will 
tell. He took a count of four and arose 
again, to meet a third swing, which laid him 
cold. Ten minutes later, when Mr. Hoffman 
was on his way back to Bloomington. Mr. 
McGrath arose from the stool to which he 
had been lifted and offered to fight the 
referee. 



Sport fans may now see as well as hear their 
favorite stars over the air. Daily at 6:45 
p. M., C. S. T., Hal Tottcn, sports announcer 
of WMAQ at Chicago, introduces some sports 
celebrity over that station and over \\ 9XAP, 
its allied television station. Tottcn is also 
"fanning" on baseball at 6:30 p. M. Satur- 
days, over WMAQ. 



Pat Flanagan, sports announcer at WBBM, 
is on the air at 8 p. M., C. S. T., every Satur- 
day this month, with prc-season dope on the 
recruits coming up in the big leagues this 
season, and bulletins from training-camps. 



WGES, at Chicago, will wind up its hockey 
broadcasts this month. It goes on the air 
whenever the Chicago Blackhawks play at 
home, generally Sunday and Thursday, 8:3 

r. m. 



Some fellows started out to play a putt-putl 
golf marathon tournament at Chicago last 
month. At the last report it had gone 1 S J 
hours, and the announcer at WKBI, a local 
station which broadcast the breath-taking af- 
fair, was about to come down with the jitters 
in his search for new adjectives. 



March, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page T- 




MILDRED HUNT, NBC crooner, tried her 
songs out successfully on British listeners last 
summer. HELEN SADA is a soprano mem- 
ber of Roxy's Chorus heard on the "Gang" 
programs Mondays at 7:45 P. M. GEORGE 
HICKS, NBC announcer, has won widespread 
popularity by his skillful handling of special 
events broadcasts. 



George 
Tficks 





CLAIRE MADJETTE, soprano, is a recent 
and beautiful addition to Row's famous 
"Gang." MARY CHARLES, recently with 
the La Palina Smoke Dreams, is featured in a 
fifteen-minute song recital over CBS each 
Thursday at 8 p. m. JOSEF KOESTNER is 
leading the orchestra heard in many programs 
from the Chicago NBC studios. 



JbmaJarttiTi 



Old Gold is back again — with a sixty-six 
station hook-up on a two-a-week schedule, and 
with a "one-man" show. The hook-up is on 
the Columbia network, the schedule is 8:15 
to 8:30 on Tuesdays, and 9:15 to 9:30 on 
Thursdays, and the "one-man" show is MISS 
LORNA FANTIN, numerologist. 

Lorna Fantin's broadcasts include numcr- 
ological observations on the important news 
events of the day, character analyses of fa- 
mous people, living and dead, who have changed 
their names, and forecasts of the future. She 
invites listencrs-in on the Old Gold program 
to send her their full names and birth dates 
for a personal and individual numcrological 
character reading. 




Radio's most sensational speaker of He obligingly agreed. Father Coughlin 
to-day wears the clerical black of that has not intimated to us that he will 
most unsensational of human institu- do otherwise than live up to his promise 
tions, the Roman Catholic Church, to temper and restrain his remarks." 
He is the REV. CHARLES E. COUGH- There was a forerunning incident 
LIN, whose Hour of the Little Flower that called forth that statement. Father 
is broadcast weekly over the Columbia Coughlin announced in one of his pro- 
chain at 7 p. M., E. S. T., Sundays. grams that, because of objections to 
Father Coughlin speaks his mind. In his remarks, there was danger of his 

being taken off the air. 

That announcement brought 40,000 
letters to one station alone, WMAQ, 
at Chicago. Over the whole chain, 



recent weeks he has used this excellent 
instrument on such controversial sub- 
jects as the decisions of President 
Hoover and the members of his Cabinet, 



Communists — the duties of employers the mail ran into the hundreds of thou- 

and capital in general in the unemploy- sands. Most of the missives protested 

ment crisis, and birth control. against dropping the program. Not 

Such outspokenness was bound to since the time was changed on the 

bring kicks. The good father would Amos 'n' Andy program has WMAQ 

undoubtcdy have been grieved and dis- heard from its listeners in such volume, 

appointed if no one had disagreed with Father Coughlin, at this writing, is 

what he said. It brought a number still speaking, and quite vehemently. 
of protests to the 



Columbia chain, and 
led, finally, to the 
chain's issuance of the 
following statement: 
"We have had a 
number of complaints 
from Columbia sta- 
tions and from listen- 
ers in regard to the 
tenor of some of the 
remarks made by 
Father Coughlin in 
his Sunday talks. In 
view of the fact that 
radio represents all 
shades of beliefs, the 
suggestion was made 
to Father Coughlin 
that he temper his 
remarks and be less 
vehement in his ex- 
pressions of opinion. 




IjerOiar.fCouyklm 



The letters written 
in his defense seem 
to indicate that, even 
though they don't 
agree with him on 
every topic, his listen- 
ers love a good fight. 
Rev. Charles E. 
Coughlin is not a 
newcomer on the 
radio. Assigned to a 
small parish in De- 
troit, he built up the 
parish and the shrine 

of the I iitle Flower 
connected with it 
through radio talks. 
I lis outstanding suc- 
cess brought him his 
engagement over the 
chain, where his wide- 
spread popularity bids 
fair to keep him. 




Jhuffl/uteman 



All the color of the Paul Whitcman music 
that has kept American feet dancing for more 
than a decade is involved in the series of pro- 
grams now being presented by "The King oi 
Jazz" through NBC networks. Whitcman 
assembles his "Painters" in the NBC Chicago 
studios each Tuesday night for halt an hour 
of the music America has C0R1C to expect 
from his orchestra. The broadcasting group 
includes a galaxy of instrunient.il and vocal 

soloists, to say nothing ot man) novelty instru- 
mental combinations, giving each program a 
musical variety seldom heard on the air. 

The programs are sponsored by the Allied 
Quality Paint group. 



(? randy lichen 9ftarie 



MRS. EVELYN TOBEY, who is director of fashion for the Radio Home- 
makers' Club, on the CBS network every Wednesday at 10:45 A. M., E. S. T., 

distributes fashion news, by interpreting Puis fashion .is the smart women of 

the country approve it. Mrs. Tobcy gives detailed facts about styles in 
fabric; she adapts colors to specific uses and explains the exact treatment of 
line ."id silhouette. Through her fashion service, she intends that women 
shall be made f.ishion-wise and fashion-right. 

Besides this fashion service, Peter Pan Forecasts bring to the Columbia 
audience the important personalities of the leading fashion establishments of 
this country. The program, wliii.li opened with an eve-witness report of the 
Paris spring style show, by Opt. Edward Molyricux, continues with such 
guest speakers as GRAND DUCHESS MARIE of Russia, now associated with 
Bcrgdorf -Goodman; CHARLES J. OPPIM II l\1. [it., president of Jay-Thorpe; 
MISS COPELAND of Patulla, and COLETTE CHARTII R, fashion manager 
of "Pictorial Review." 




CfiarJOppenheim Jr. 



Page 1 6 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



(W 



WITH this present re- 
vamped issue of 
What's on the Air goes out 
to you the sincere hope of the 
editors that the magazine will 
the better serve your needs. 
Every change which has taken 

place in this monthly has been made with the 
thought of thereby rendering our readers a more 
adequate service. 

First — Each day's programs are made more 
easily accessible, as they appear on two facing pages. 

Second — More of the day's programs arc listed, 
as the time has been extended to cover programs 
running from 4 P. M. to 1 a. m., E. S. T. (3 P. M. 
to midnight, C. S. T. ). 

Third — Many who have requested listings of 
additional stations will be much gratified to see the 
execution of their wishes. 

Fourth — The State guide lines have been restored 
to the station lists. 

Fifth — The program lists have been so arranged 
that for each time period every chain program on 
the air is shown. 

All that one needs to do to locate any chain 
program is to turn to its listing at its particular 
hour, note its symbol, and then locate the same 
symbol in the equivalent time channel in the sta- 
tion list. 

Sixth — At the foot of each left-hand page are 
to be found listings of such chain daytime pro- 
grams as are carried by a wide array of stations. 

Seventh — At the foot of each right-hand page 
are listed local station programs which have been 
recommended as especially interesting by our read- 
ers for the benefit not only of D-Xers, but those 
listeners who want to hear something that differs 
from the chain offerings or their own local pro- 
gram at a given period. 

Eighth — Pages 32 to 34 are devoted to a more 
extensive log service. A list of all North American 
broadcasting stations — call letters, location, power 
and channel, followed by (one month) a list of sta- 
tions (100 watts or over) by channels; the next 
month, by States and cities. The wave-length 
guide, on page 34, becomes a complete list of sta- 
tions affiliated with the two major chains. 



&li^QV[hm fymunc&inerfts 



6 r ) 



Ninth — "We have added a radio map with the 
most ingenious device for giving air distance in 
miles. 

Tenth — On page 34 will be found an alpha- 
betical index to all chain programs. 

In all these changes we have been guided by 
the suggestions of regular readers of What's on 
the Air. Of course, there were other suggestions 
of real merit we could not inaugurate. Our 
mechanical equipment enforces its own limitations, 
as does the space available. 

We shall be glad to hear from all who have 
written us heretofore as to their reaction to the 
changes we have effected. 

You will, of course, want to use the March 
service for at least a week before writing intelli- 
gently about it. 

•M 

A new series of Eastman Kodak programs will 
be inaugurated March 27, at 10 P. M., over WEAF 
and associates. 

Yeast Foamers shift from Wednesday night to 
2:30 p. m., Sunday afternoon, over WJZ and a 
coast-to-coast network. 

The new Westinghouse Sunday evening program 
over WJZ and associated stations will have its 
premiere at 7 p. m. on March 15. 



No details are as yet available concerning the 
National Dairy Products Co. program which opens 
over WEAF Sunday evening, March 1, at 10:15. 



Before the end of March it is expected that the 
synchronization experiment authorized by the Fed- 
eral Radio Commission for WTIC, at Hartford, 



and WBAL, at Baltimore, will 
be in full operation. Both of 
these powerful stations share 
an allocation of 1060 kilocy- 
cles, necessitating half-time 
service for each. By means of 
synchronization, when WTIC 
is operating on 1060 kilocycles, WBAL will co- 
ordinate with WJZ on 760 kilocycles, while, when 
WBAL occupies the assigned channel, WTIC will 
work with WEAF on 660 kilocycles. 

CFCF, station of the Canadian Marconi Com- 
pany, at Montreal, is the newest member of the 
NBC network. It operates on 1030 kilocycles, 
using 1650-watts power. 



CBS also announces a new associate in station 
KOH of Reno, Nev. The Reno station, which 
operates on 1370 kilocycles and is just installing 
a 1000-watt transmitter, will use sixteen hours a 
day of CBS programs. 

At presstime we have been unable to ascertain 
the time of presentation or station list for the new 
series of "Radio Follies" programs to open over 
CBS in March. Norman Brokenshire has been re- 
engaged as master of ceremonies, and various stage 
celebrities of Broadway are being recruited as guest 
artists. The opening night for "Radio Follies" will 
be March 13. 



Major Bowes and his Capitol Family, for years 
a Sunday night feature, has been shifted to Friday 
evening beginning March 6. A full hour — from 
7 to 8 — will be given to this program over WEAF 
and associated stations. 



Too late for this issue come letters from read- 
ers in Canada, Mexico and Cuba, telling of recent 
changes in the broadcasting set-up in their respec- 
tive countries. These additions will appear in our 
April list of North American broadcasting stations. 



THE program- 
finding service 
of What's on the 
Air covers the hours 
from 4 p. m. to 1 a. 

m., E. S. T., or 3 to midnight, C. S. T., for 
every day in March. It is so simple as scarcely 
to need explanation. There is but one thing to 
remember — programs preceded by figures or 

LETTERS IN SQUARES ARE NBC PROGRAMS; PRO- 
GRAMS PRECEDED BY FIGURES IN CIRCLES OR 
BLACK LETTERS A TO K ARE COLUMBIA PRO- 
GRAMS; ALL OTHER SYMBOLS REFER TO LOCAL 
PROGRAMS. 

Suppose, Sunday, March 1, about 3 o'clock, 
a new reader at Dcs Moines desired to select a 
program. He might best turn to pages 1 8 and 
19, at the inner side of which the programs for 
March 1 arc listed, and read over what is offered 
at 3 P. m., C. S. T. He would find [J] Dr. 
Cadman, g] Williams' Oilomatics and Q New 
York Philharmonic. Referring to the station 
list and watching the 3 o'clock channel, at Iowa 
stations he would find that Council Bluffs was 
carrying Q the New York Philharmonic, as 
were Waterloo and Sioux City, and that Des 



GUIDE TO PROGRAM SERVICE (Pp. 18-31) 

How to Find the Program You Want When You Want It 



Moines was offering [J] Dr. Cadman. To get 
[41 Williams' Oilomatics, however, he would 
have to go further afield. A quick glance up 
and down the 3 o'clock channel reveals that 
WREN, at Lawrence, Kan., is probably the 
nearest station carrying [4] ; but WGN, at 
Chicago, also carries it, and WGN happens to 
have a clear channel and may be easier to get. 
At any rate, our new Dcs Moines reader is able, 
in a few seconds, to choose and find the most 
promising program. 

■;- 

To Make a Long Distance Test (DX) 

Ascertain which of your local stations arc 
broadcasting chain features at the moment. 
Tune in one of these and find out what number 
is being rendered. Then start your detector 
dial at either end of its arc and turn slowly. As 
soon as you hear the same number, note your 
dial setting and check back to the column show- 



ing wave length, (on 
page 34), thus ascer- 
taining the approxi- 
mate wave length of 
the station you arc 
receiving. To the left of this column you will 
find the call letters of stations on the wave 
length of that station and those having approx- 
imately that wave length. Reference to the 
schedule of programs applying to the time you 
are listening will show you which of these sta- 
tions is broadcasting the program to which you 
are listening, and you can thus identify it with- 
out having to wait for call letters. 

1% 

Agents Wanted! 

Take orders for What's on the Air sub- 
scriptions in your community. Every radio 
home a good prospect. Your friends and neigh- 
bors will enjoy this new radio program directory 
and magazine. Full or part time work. Liberal 
offer to both men and women. 

Write for our proposition to agents. Circu- 
lation Manager, What's on the Air, Ninth 
and Cutter Sts., Cincinnati, O. 



March, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 17 




en/on 



feminine member of the British House of 
Commons, will open the CBS international 
broadcast for March on the first. 

COMMANDER KENWORTHY, also 
an M. P., will speak on "The Freedom of 
the Seas" on March 8. Mr. Kenworthy is 
the son of the Baron of Strabolgi. 




Don £.6 il wan yfi'n// 9lakayama 

So similar in taste to the American radio 
audience is the rapidly growing one of 
Japan that RIUJI NAKAYAMA, managing 
director of the Broadcasting Corporation 
of Japan, has come to the United States 
to confer with Don E. Gilman, vice-pres- 
ident in charge of the Pacific Division, 
National Broadcasting Company, on plans 
which the Japanese corporation is making 
to establish direct communication with the 
United States. 









via 




Wuyh Walpcte 




Commander JCemoortfy 3 firJamnel Woare 



The Clara, Lu and Em programs are heard five nights a week, Tuesday, Wednes- 
day, Thursday, Friday and Saturday at 10:30 o'clock, E. S. T., through an extensive 
NBC network. The programs originate in the NBC Chicago studios and are in 
no way connected with the weekly Palmolive Hour, heard from New York. 

Clara is known outside the microphone circle as Louise Starkey; Lu's real name 
is Isabelle Carothers, while Em is in reality Helen King. All three are graduates of 
Northwestern, where the three principal characters were born. Other characters in 
the programs, introduced only through conversation of the girls and including 
Clara's husband and their two children; Em's husband and five children and Lu's 
one daughter, are radio creations. 

The program is an "all-talkie," the girls building their gossip on current topics 
and their own domestic affairs. 




3^?3fc**** 



s &uyene Ormandy 



A notable program is that presented by The Dutch Masters from 8:30 to 9:00 
o'clock, E. S. T., every Friday evening over the Columbia network. It brings to the 
microphone each week Lillian Taiz, musical comedy star; Nelson Eddy, concert bari- 
tone, and Jack Smart, the "Joe" of Graybar's "Mi. and Mrs." 

It brings to radio listeners The Dutch Masters, an orchestra composed of 
eighteen men who are among the leading musicians of this country. 

It presents a conductor of The Dutch Masters, Eugene Ormandy, former leader 
of the Symphony Orchestra at the Capitol Theater in New York, and guest conductor 
of the Philadelphia Symphony and the New York Philharmonic Orchestras. 

William Spicltcr, who arranged the scores of such Broadway successes as "Follow 
Thru" and "The Student Prince," is the song arranger. 



will tell us about "The Books of 
Spring," speaking from London on 
March 29. LORD MAYNIHAN will 
talk March 22. 

SIR SAMUEL HOARE, former Sec- 
retary of State for Air, will speak 
March 1 5 on "Freedom of the Air." 





tyiortoriVoumey ^^g$& 

MORTON DOWNEY, whose song re- 
citals and broadcasts from his exclusive 
Club Delmonico over the Columbia net- 
work have been heard only since Decem- 
ber, already has created a vogue for a new 
type of voice. His unusually high tenor, 
coupled with his trills, has supplanted the 
so-called "crooning" as the popular choice 
with listeners, men and women alike. Flis 
remarkable diction and enunciation en- 
hances his interpretation of ballads. 





/Jjlia/CJaiz *Jackfmait cj 



Page 18 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



SUNDAY 



March 



8 



15 



22 



29 



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960 TORONTO C NRX 


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♦ On Air Part Time. 



CBS. 

8:OOa.m. — Heroes of the Church. 
10:15 — Adventures of Helen and Mary. 
Noon — Jewish Art Program. 
12:30 — International Broadcasts. 
12:45- — Grenadier Guards Band of Montreal. 

1:30 — Conclave of Nations. 

2:00 — Cathedral Hour. 

3:00— New York Philharmonic. 



NBC (through WEAF). 
9:00 A. M. — The Balladecrs. 


1 1 


1I:OOa.m. — Special Symphony Oichcstra. 


12 


12:30— Neapolitan Days. 
1:00 — National Oratorio Society. 


1 

1 


2:00 — Moonshine and Honeysuckle. 


1 


2:30 — NBC Artists' Service. 
3:00 — The Pilgrims. 
3:30 — Richard Crooks. 


2 
2 
3 



E.S.T 

4 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



8 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Q] Dr. S. Parkes Cadman 

Radio choir and orchestra; direc- 
tion, Geo. Dihvorth. 

a Williams Oilomatics 

Orchestra; direction, Josef Koest- 
ner. 

O New York Philharmonic 
Symphony Orchestra 

Direction, Arturo Toscanini. 

ffl Dr. S. Parkes Cadman 
IU"Your Eyes" 

Musical ensemble. 

Q New York Philharmonic 
L21 Davey Hour 

Jlixed chorus; orchestra; Chandler 
Goldwaite, organist. 

U National Vespers 

Dr. Harry Fosdick; the Pilgrims 
sextet ; orchestra. 

Q Sermon by Dr. Donald 
Barnhouse 

[U Davey Hour 

LU National Vespers 

© Sweethearts of the Air 

ffl Catholic Hour 

Sermon; music by MediaevalisU; 
guest artists. 

[4] Raising Junior 

Humorous skit, with Aline Berry 
and Peter Dixon. 

[5] Margaret Olsen 

Soprano. 

Fox Fur Trappers 

With Earle Nelson. 

Catholic Hour 
Musical Moment 

Norman Price, tenor. 

Fox Fur Trappers 
Catholic Hour 
Cook's Travelogue 
Northern Lights 

Astrid Fielde and the Tollefson trio. 

Howard Dandies 

Freddie Rich's orchestra and guest 
artists. 



o 

ffl 
11 

o 

ffl 
m 



in 
en 



Catholic Hour 
Cook's Travelogue 
Howard Dandies 



Iodent Club 

With Bob Emery and the Joy 
Spreaders; directed by Joe Rines. 

Westinghouse Salute 

First program March 15. 



© Golden Hour of the Little Flower 
© 



Rev. Chas. E. Coughlin, from Detroit. 

Golden Hour of the Little 

Flower 
[2J Iodent Club 
[9] AVestinghnuse Salute 
[3] RCA Victor Program 

Orchestra direction, Nathaniel Shil- 
kvet. 

[A] Harbor Lights 

Edwin Whitney and Leslie Joy, in 
tales of an old sea captain. 

© Golden Hour of the Little 

Flower 
© Golden Hour of the Little 

Flower 
[3] KCA Victor Program 
[A] Harbor Lights 

\2\ Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 

Rubinoff conducting; Maurice Chev- 
alier. 

\3\ Enna Jettick Melodies 

Bets; Ayves. Mary Hopple. Steele 
Jamison, Leon Salathiel, 

O "Devils, Drugs and Doctors" 

Prof. Howard W. Haggard. 



NBC (through W'JZ). 
00 a. m. — Special Symphony Orchestra. 
JO — Nomads. 
00 — Metropolitan Echoes. 
?0 — Echoes of the Orient. 
45 — Little Jack Little. 
00 — Library of Congress Musicalc. 
30 — Yeast Eoamcrs. 
3:00 — Dr. Daniel A. Poling. 



KEY TO 

N News 
O Educational 
P Children's 
feature 
R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



LOCAL PROGRAMS 
S Sports 
T Dramatic 
V Variety 
W Comic 
X On the air 

M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 
M Variety 



.March. 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 19 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Q U. S. School of Music 
(4] Collier's Radio Hour 

Orchestra; dramatized stories; guest 
speakers. 

[2] Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 
© Kaltenborn Edits the News 

[2| Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 
[4] Collier's Radio Hour 
© Irene Beasley 

[2] Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 
[4] Collier's Radio Hour 

[5] "Our Government" 

David Lawrence. (First 15 min.) 

[6j Atwater Kent Hour 

Orchestra: direction. Josef Paster- 
nack. (Second 15 min.) 

[7] Program [5] Followed by [§] 

@] Collier's Radio Hour 

(First 15 min.) 

[Ej Radio Luminaries 

(Second 15 min.) 

[F] Program @] Followed by [E] 
© Arabesque 

Serial drama. 

Graham-Page Hour 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra and 
Edgar Guest. 

[6] Atwater Kent Hour 
[Gj Floyd Gibbons 

(First 15 min.) 

O Reminiscences 

(Second 15 min.) 

GO Program [G] Followed by Qj 

[6] Atwater Kent Hour 

(First 15 min.) 

\§\ National Dairy Program 

(Second 15 min.) 

[9] Program [§J Followed by [g] 

[H] Reminiscences 

(First 15 min.) 

\K\ Penzoil Pete 

Andy Sannella and novelty orches- 
tra. (Second 15 min.) 

[QProgram |0 Followed by[R] 
O Royal's Poet of the Organ 

Jesse Crawford and the Duotones. 

[g] National Dairy Program 

(First 15 min.) 

[A] Sunday at Seth Parker's 

Down East hymn sing. (Second 15 
min.) 

[B] Program [g] Followed by [A] 
[2] Kaffee Hag Slumber Music 

siring ensemble. 

Q The Gauchos 

Q Be Square Motor Club 



IC.S.T. 

15 



30 
45 



8 



30 



[A] Sunday at Seth Parker's 

(Firsl 15 min.) 

[C] Muriel and Vee 

(Second 15 min.) 

[D] Program [A) Followed by[C] 

[E] Even Song 

( Firsl l."> min.) 

[F] Heel Hugger Harmonies 

Quartet and orchestra. (Second 15 
min.) 

[G] Program E Followed by [0 

O Back Home Hour from Buffalo 

Sermon l»y Rev. Clinton Churchill. 
[JJ Russian Cathedral Choir 

Nicholas Vasilii ft', director. 
\3\ South Sea Islands 

Joseph Rodgers, director. 

O Back Home Hour from 
Buffalo 



O Quiet Harmonies 

Vincent Sony and orchestra. 
Q Nocturne 

Ann Leaf al the organ. 



30 



10 



30 



11 

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WBAP Ft. Worth 800 

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*On Air Part Tim* 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 

E. S. T. Subtr.ict I hour for C. S. T., 2 
for M. S. T. 
Cliin.itown Rescue Service, WAK.A. 
All Canadian Symphony Hour, over 
WW | and all CN Canadian stations. 
Red Lacquer and Jade, WOR. 
Voices at Twilight, WENR. 



3:30- 
5:00- 



5:30- 
6:30- 



7:00 — The I3.iltimorc.ins, WBAL. 
7:00— Chronicles, \VTM|. 
7:35— Little Brown < hurch, Wl S. 
8:00 — Manor House Opera, WGN. 
8:00— ArlinRton Orchestra, Kills 
8:30 — Sunday livening Club, WMAQ. 
9:00— Ludwig Bauman Program, \\(>K 
9:00 — Sports Review, KDKA 



9:00— Downer'-; Grove Club, WENR. 

9:30 — Croslcy Concert Hour, WI.S. 
10:15— Rhythm Symphony. WSM. 
10:30— Grucn Guildsmcn, WKRC 
10:30 — The Solitaire Cowboys, KOA. 
11:30— Mike and Herman, WENR. 
11:30— Bill Hay in liiblc Readings, WMAQ. 
1 I :49- The Homing Hour. WHAS. 



Midnight Radio Rodeo, WHN, WPAP, 
WGBS, WMCA. March 8 and 22, 
c ,1 idiron < lub. 

Midnight- -Quiet Harmonies, WI\AN. 

Midnight — ( rosley Review, WLW. 

Midnight -Air Vaudeville, WENR, 

Midnight -Music About Town, KMI'.t . 
12:30— Light Opera, KMOX. 
1:00— Nutty Club, WBBM. 



Page 20 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



MONDAY 



March . 2 . 9 . 16 



23 



30 



E S.T 



EASTERN TIME 


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CHAIN PROGRAMS 
ffl U. S. Service Band 

SI Seven Aces Orchestra 

C Ann Leaf at the Organ 

D Radio Listening Test 

E U. S. Service Band 

O Dance Music from New York 

\5\ Classic Gems from Chicago 

ffl U. S. Service Band 



[2] The Lady Next Door 

Children's program; direction, 
Madge Tucker. 

[U Maltine Story Program 

Dramatized story. 

Q Gypsy Music Makers 

Emery Deutsch. 

F Virginia Arnold 

Pianist. 

G Tony's Scrap-book 
gJGobel Mystery Girl 

Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 
[U Tea Timers 

Dance band. 

[7] Market Reports, "Sports and 
Recreation" 



ffl Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

Direction, Ludwig Laurier. 

[U Start and Stop, from Chicago 
O Fulton Royal Orchestra 
[7] Mormon Tabernacle Choir 

Edward P. Kemball, organist. 

ffl Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra 

O Fulton Royal Orchestra 

The Melody Musketeers 

[2] "Who's Behind the Name?" 

[7] Mormon Tabernacle Choir 

© Eno Crime Club 

ffl Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra 

[U Literary Digest Topics 

Lowell Thomas. 



A Musical Demi-tasse 

John Barclay and Dagmer Eybner. 

Amos 'n' Andy 
Current Events 

Kaltenborn. 

Club Belleau Orchestra 



© 

SI 



The World To-day 

James G. McDonald. 



[A] Tastyeast Jesters 

Dwight Latham, AVamp Carlson and 
Guy Bonham. 

[U Careless Love 

Negro sketch. 

[U Phil Cook 

© Evangeline Adams 

Astrologer. 

© Anheuser-Busch Program 

Tony Cabooch. 

[URoxy's Gang Program 

From Roxy Theater, New York City. 

[5] Careless Love 



* On Air Port Time. 



C.S.T. 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:00 A. M. — Tony's Scrap-book. 

8:30 — Morning Devotions. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
'0:00-12:00 — Radio Home-makers. 
12:00-2:30 — Music. 

2:30 — American School of the Air. 

3:00^ — Columbia Salon Orchestra. 

3:30 — Ann Leaf at Organ. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

8:00 — Gene and Glenn, E. S. T. stations. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:00 — Gene and Glenn, C. S. T. stations. 

9:02 — Parnassus String Trio. 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45— A. & P. Program. 
I ll: Ml — Jean Carroll. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

7:30 — Rise and Shine (band). 

8:30 — Vermont Lumber Jacks. 

9:45 — Miracles of Magnolia. 
10:00 — Safeguarding Food Supply. 
10:45 — Winifred S. Carter. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30— Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO LOCAL PROGRAMS 
N News S Sports 

T Dramatic 



O Educational 

P Children's 

feature 

R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



V Variety 

W Comic 

X On the air 

M 6. Popular 
M 7. Symphonic 
M 8. Organ 
M 9. Semi-classical 
M Variety 



March. 1031 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 21 



E.S.T. 

8 



15 



30 



45 



30 



10 



30 



11 



30 



12 



30 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
H "How's Business?" 

Merle Thorpe. 

[5] Roxy 's Gang Program 
O Barbara Maurel 

Contralto. 

© Literary Digest Topics 
© Barbasol Program 

Barber shop quartet. 

[2j Fifteen Minutes in the Nation's 
Capital 

HfjRoxy's Garig Program 

[3] A. & P. Gypsies 

Quintet and orchestra; direction, 
Harry Horlick 

[6j To Be Announced 
O Savino Tone Pictures 

Orchestra, soloist, chorus. 

O Savino Tone Pictures 
[3] A. & P. Gypsies 
(6l To Be Announced 



© The Three Bakers 

Leo Reisman's orchestra with Gor- 
don and Glenn Cross and Gibson 
Noland. 

® A. & P. Gypsies 
[7] Maytag Orchestra 

Direction, Victor Young. 

[g] Chesebrough Real Folks 

Sketch of small-town life. 

[4] General Motors Program 

Orchestra direction, Frank Black. 

© Evening in Paris 

Pierre Brngnon, master of ceremo- 
nies. 



C.S.T. 

7 



March 



9 



16 



23 



30 



MONDAY 



15 



30 



© 



Robert Burns Program 

Guy Lombardo's orchestra. 

I Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 

Dramatic sketch. 

I Stromberg-Carlson Program 

Rochester Civic Orchestra; soloists. 

I Deep River Orchestra 

Direction, Willard Robinson. 

I Empire Builders 

Dramatic sketch; orchestra direc- 
tion, .Josef Koestncr. 

Story in a Song 
Don Amaizo 



D Morton Downey and Orchestra 
E Leon Belasco's Orchestra 
® Dance Music from New York 
[7] Slumber Music 

String ensemble; direction, Ludwig 
Laurier. 

® Amos 'n' Andy 

© Dance Music from New York 

[7] Slumber Music 

(4] Dance Music from New York 

© Asbury Park Casino 

[TJ Phil Spitalny Orchestra 

[2] Adventure's of .Sherlock 
Holmes 

[3] Cotton Club Orchestra 

[4] Dance Music from New York 
© Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at the organ. 



45 



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♦ On Air Part Tima 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
E. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:00— Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 
6:45— little Orphan Annie, WGN. 
7:00— Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:00 — Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 
7:10— The Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 
7:45— Hob Ncwhall (sports), WLW. 



8:00— Old Tiddlers, KTI IS. 10:00- 

T., 2 8:00— Smiling Id McConncll, WI V. 10:1 S- 

8:30— Hayes Hayloft Theater, WLS. 10:30- 

9:00— Jug Band, W'HAS. 10:30- 

9:)0— Famous Singers, WMAQ. 10:30- 

9:30 — Boxing Matches, WGBS. 10:30- 

10:00— The Smith Family, WLNR. 11:00- 

10:00 — Star Dust. WBAP. 11:00- 

10:00— Musical Movies, WSM. 11:20- 



Kilowatt Hour, WTMJ. 

Mountain Valley Mount'neers, WBBM. 

Tillv and Billy, WGR. 

lord Minstrel show, WDAF. 
-Dixie Spiritual Singers, WRVA. 
-Organ Recital, CFRB. 
-Witching Hour, WKRC. 
-Willis Music.il Memories, WLW. 
-Hcrr Louie and the Weasel, WGN. 



11:34— D-X Club, WMAQ. 

12:00 — Dance Music, WMAQ. 
12:00— Dance Music. WLW. 
12:1 5 — Ben Bcrnic, WBBM. 
12: 15— Air Vaudeville, WINR. 
12:15 — Around the Town, WBBM. 

1:00 — Frolic of Dodos, K ISP. 

1:15 — Irma Glen at Organ, WENR. 

2:00— Hamp's Congress Orchestra, KYW. 



Page 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



TUESDAY 



March 



3 . 10 . 17 



24 



31 



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CHAIN PROGRAMS 
© Italian Idyll 

Vincent Sorey and orchestra. 

[4] Pacific Vagabonds 

From San Francisco. 

a Pacific Vagabonds 
© Columbia Artist Recital 

E Rhythm Kings 

Nat Brusilorr, conductor. 

F Adventures in Words 

Dr. Frank Vizetelly. 

[3] Pond's 

Guest speaker; Leo Ileisman's or- 
chestra. 

a Voices 

a Rinso Talkie 

(First 15 min.) 

a The Lady Next Door 

(Second 15 min.) 

a Program a Followed by a 

[K] Program a Followed by 
Rex Cole Mountaineers 

a Stock Market Reports 

© Lowns Biltmore Orchestra 

Direction, Bert Lown, followed by 



P.S.T. 

3 

30 



Tony's Scrap-book 



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Barclay Orchestra 

Direction, Harry Tucker. 

Black and Gold Room Orchestra 
Raising Junior 

Serial domestic sketch with Aline 
Berry and Peter Dixon. 

George Simons 

Tenor. 

Walter Mills 

Baritone. 

Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 



ffl 

© 
© 





© 



Barclay Orchestra 
Barclay Orchestra 
"Who's Behind the Name?" 
Savannah Liners Orchestra 

Direction, Dana S. Merriman. 

Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra 

Literary Digest Topics 

Eno Crime Club 

Dance Music 



O The Captivators 
a Voter's Service 
a Amos V Andy 

a Voter 's Service 
a The Vikings 

Male quartet. 

© American Mutual Program 

© Political Situation in Washington 

Frederic Wile. 

[5] Soconyland Sketches 

E Phil Cook 

a Soconyland Sketches 

[U Billiken Pickards 

|0 Adventures of Polly Preston 

[G] Three Mustachios 

© Daddy and Rollo 

Humorous sketch. 



*On Air Pnrt Time. 



30 



15 



30 



45 



6 

15 
30 

45 



CBS. 

8:00 A. m. — Tony's Scrap-book. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 

9:30 — Morning Moods. 
10:00-12:00 — Radio Home-makers. 
10:00 — Fashion Facts. 
10:30 — O'Ccdar Time. 

2:30 — American School of the Air. 

3:00 — Columbia Salon Orchestra. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

8:00 a.m. — Gene and Glenn. 

8:15 — Morning Devotions. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
11:00 — "Your Child." 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

2:30 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

8:3 — Vermont Lumber Jacks. 

8:45 — A. & P. Program. 

9:30 — Parnassus String Trio. 
10:15 — Through the Looking-glass. 
10:45 — Josephine Gibson. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

3:00 — Music in the Air. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



TO 



KEY 

N News 
O Educational 
P Children's 
feature 
R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



LOCAL PROGRAMS 
S Sports 
T Dramatlo 
V Variety 
W Comic 
X On the air 

M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 

M Variety 



March, 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Tage 23 



E.S.T 

8 


CHAIN PROGRAMS 
The International Singers 

Male quartet. 

© Literary Digest Topics 
(TJ Blackstone Plantation 

Julia Sanderson and Dan Crumit. 

[5] Paul Whiteman's Paint Men 
© Old Gold Character Readings 

Lorma Fantin, numerologist. 

[TJ Blackstone Plantation 

® Paul Whiteman's Paint Men 

[2) Florsheim Frolic 

Coon-Sanders orchestra. 

® Works of Great Composers 

Orchestra; direction, Hugo Mariani. 

© Kaltenborn Edits the News 
© Premier Salad Dressers 

Brad Browne and Al Llewelyn. 

[2] Florsheim Frolic 

® Works of Great Composers 


C. S.T. 

7 

15 
30 

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8 

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9 

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10 

1 

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11 

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Male trio, singing violins, orchestra. 

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[TJ Luck Strike Dance Orchestra 

B. A. Rolfe conducting. 

[4] To Be Announced 

E Graybar — Mr. and Mrs. 

Events in lives of Joe and Vi. 

F Blue Ribbon Malt Jester 

Richard Craig, Jr., comedian. 

© Paramount Publix Radio 

I'layliousc ; guest artists, orchestra, 
screen chats by Jerry Madison. 

ffl Lucky Strike Orchestra 
[A] Clara, Lu and Em 

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HI Landt Trio and White 

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J Premier Malt Program 

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151 Vincenl Lopez and Orchestra 
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Page 24 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



WEDNESDAY 



. March . 4 . 11 . 18 . 25 



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30 



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7 
15 

30 

45 



» On Air Port Time. 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
O Musical Album 

Columbia salon orchestra and solo- 
ists. 

ffl Morgan Trio 

Marguerite, pianist; Frances, vio- 
linist; Virginia, harpist. 

[4j Eastman Symphony Orchestra 

From WHAM, Rochester, N. Y. 

H Sky Sketches 
IU Matinee Gems 

Orchestra direction, Hugo Mariani. 

Q Musical Album 

Q Asbury Park Casino 
a The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

[U The Book Reporter 

(First 15 min.) 

E Jolly Junketeer 

Children's program. (Second 15 
min.J 

E Ivy Scott 

Soprano. (Second 15 min.) 

a Program [U Followed by E 
Program Followed by E 
[A] Gobel Mystery Girl 

Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 
[U Tea Timers 

(First 15 min.) 

m Stock Market Reports 
G The International Singers 
H Tony's Scrap-book 

O Bill Schudt's Going to Press 
ffl Black and Gold Room Orchestra 
ffl Raising Junior 
m Smith Ballew Orchestra 
Q Winegar's Barn Orchestra 
ffl Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra 

a Conti Program 

ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
[A] Gloria Gay's Affairs 
Q Winegar's Barn Orchestra 
Q Eno Crime Club 
O Dance Music 
H Uncle Abe and David 

Rural sketch with Phillips Lord and 
Arthur Allen. 

a Literary Digest Topics 

a Rodeheaver Sing 

a Amos 'n' Andy 

© Morton Downey 

© Downey and Orchestra 

[4] Science 

A talk. 

[D] The Edward Rambler 
E Silver Masked Tenor 
m Boscul Moments 

Mme. Fiances Alda ami Frank La 
Forge. 

E Phil Cook 

© Evangeline Adams 

Astrologer, 

© Daddy and Rollo 

Humorous dialogue. 

m Back of the News in Washington 

William Hard. 
IG] Smith Brothers Orchestra 



C.S.T. 

3 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



6 

15 
30 

45 



CBS. 

8:30 — Morning Devotions. 

8:45 — The Old Dutch Girl. 
10:00 to Noon — Radio Home-makers. 
12:00 — Paul Trcmainc. 

2:00 — Columbia Artist Bureau. 

2:30 — American School of Air. 

3:00 — Columbia Salon Orchestra. 

3:30 — Syncopated Silhouettes. 



NRC (through WEAF). 
8:30 — Cheerio. 
9:15 — Campbell Program. 
9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:00 to 12:00 — Household Interests including 
National Home Hour, Bell, Crocker, 
Radio Household Institute. 
12:00 — On Wings of Song. 
3:30— Radio Play Bill. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

9:45 — Miracles of Magnolia. 
10:00 — Mary Hale Martin. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

1:45 — Little Jack Little. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:00 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:15 — Blue Blazers. 

3:3 — Evening Stars. 



KEY TO LOCAL 
N News 
O Educational 
P Children's 
feature 
R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



PROGRAMS 
S Sports 
T Dramatic 
V Variety 
W Comic 
X. On the air 

M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 

M Variety 



March. 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Taj 



c 25 



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CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Listerine Program 

Bobby Jones, golf chats. 

To Be Announced 
U. S. Service Band 

Literary Digest Topics 
U. S. Service Band 
Radiotron Varieties 

"Bugs" Baer, AVekome Lewis. Sam 
Herman, Harold van Emburgli. 

[6] To Be Announced 
\3\ Mobiloil Concert 

Henry M. Xeely; guest artists; or- 
che*tra direction, Nathaniel Shilkret. 

ffl Canadian Pacific Program 
O Sun Kist Musical Cocktail 
O Sun Kist Musical Cocktail 
[3] Mobiloil Concert 
[7] Canadian Pacific Program 



I Halsey Stuart Program 

"Old Counsellor," symphony or- 
chestra. 

I Wayside Inn 

The Choristers. 

Gold Medal Fast Freight 

Male quartet and organist. 

The Columbians 

Male trio and Freddie Rich's orches- 
tra. 

Palmolive Hour 

Soloists; male quartet; orchestra 
direction, Gustave Haenschen. 

Camel Pleasure Hour 

Soloists: male chorus; piano duo; 
orchestra direction, Charles Previn. 



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Palmolive Hour 
Camel Pleasure Hour 
Columbia Experimental 
Laboratory 

Dramatic sketch. 

Columbia Concerts Bureau 

Concert and opera artists. 

Coca Cola Program 

Sports interview by Grantland Rice; 
string orchestra; direction, Leonard 
Joy. 

Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous sketch. (First 15 min.) 

[B] Poems 

Reading by Howard M. Claney. 

[C] Program [A] Followed by ® 

[3] Vincent Lopez Orchestra 
[S] Amos V Andy 

(First 1 ■"> mill.) 

E Camel Pleasure Hour 
(Second 1 •") min.) 

[F] Program ® Followed by E 

[6] Slumber Music 

String ensemble; direction, Ludwig 
Laurier. 

© Royal Canadians 

Direction, Guy Lombardo. 

O Biltmore Orchestra 

Direction, Bert Lown. 

@] Jack Albin's Orchestra 

[6] Slumber Music 

[7] ( fame! Pleasure Hour 

[TJ Florence Richardson's Orchestra 

[A] Camel Pleasure Hour 

( First 1 ."> min.) 

[3] Henry Busse's Orchestra 
O St. Moritz Orchestra 
Q Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at the organ. 

[5] Joe Morgan's Orchestra 

|4] Wayne King's Orchestra 
From Chicago. 



c.s.s. 

7 



15 



30 



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8 



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10 



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11 



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March . 4 . 11 



18 . 25 



WEDNESDAY 



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*On Air P.rt Tim. 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 



E. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. T., 2 
for M. S. T. 
Little Orphan Annie, WGN. 
Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 
Deacon's Dicta, WC.OO. 
Joe and the Cap'n, VCHAS. 
Bachelor Cigar Program, CKGW. 



6:45 
7:00 
7:10 
7:30 
8:00 
8:00— Olscn and Ebann, KY\C. 



8:30 — Doings of the Gordons, WI.S. 

9:00— Onova Program. \VI \V. 

9:00— Quinn Ryan's Rambles, WGN. 

9:00 — Vocal Knscmblc, WI.S. 

9:30— Drama, WGR. 
10:00— Wccncr Minstrels, WENR. 
10:30— Old Spanish Singing School, WHK. 
10:30— Sara Ann McCabe, WIBO. 
10:45— Bob Ncwhall, WI..W. 



11:00— Witching Hour, WKRC. 
11:00— Richmond Orchestra, WRVA. 
11:20 — Hcrr Louie and Weasel, WGN. 
11:30— Croslcy Theater of Air, WLW. 
11:30— Dan and Sylvia, WMAQ. 
11:30— Wayne King's Orchestra, KYW. 
12:00— Air Vaudeville, WENR. 
12:00— Dance Music. WMAQ- 
12:15— Around the Town, WBBM. 



Readers are invited p> write in about local 
programs regularly featured, which arc un- 
usual, cither in content or quality, and which 
they recommend to other listeners. Be sure 
to give station and time and description, as 
well as the title. Wc are unable to list many 
programs which have been recommended be- 
cause of failure to give time. 



Page 26 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



THURSDAY 



March 



5 . 12 



19 



26 



E.S.T 



EASTERN TIME 


4 30 


5 


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6 


15 


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45 


7 


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8 


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9 


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10 


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11 


30 


12 


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CENTRAL TIME 


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4 


30 


5 


15 


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45 


6 


15 


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45 


7 


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8 


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CaiL 730 MONTREAL cNRM 

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* On Air Part Time. 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
The Three Doctors 



C.S.T. 



© 

ffl The Magic of Speech 



Russell Pratt, Ransom Sherman and 
Joe Randolph. 



© 



Home Decoration 

(First 15 min.) 

Happy Harmonies 

(Second 15 min.) 

Program [C] Followed by B 
Asbury Park Casino 
Dancing Melodies 
U. S. Service Band 



© Melody Magic 

Girls' trio and Emery Deutsch's or- 
chestra. 

H The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

HI Brazilian-American Program 
Rinso Talkie 

(First 15 min.) 



IS 



IB 
ffl 
© 



Rex Cole Mountaineers 

(Second 15 min.) 

Program [A] Followed by 
Stock Market Reports 
Bert Lown's Orchestra 

Followed by 

Tony's Scrap-book 



© 

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ffl 

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© 

© 

ffl 



© 

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Fulton Royal Orchestra 

Direction, Gordon Kibbler. 

Black and Gold Room Orchestra 
Raising Junior 

Serial sketch. 

Susan Steell 

Soprano. 

Black and Gold Eooin 

Orchestra 

Peter van Steeden Orchestra 

And talk by John B. Kennedy. 

Fulton Eoyal Orchestra 
Pancho and His Orchestra 

Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 

Peter van Steeden Orchestra 

Uncle Abe and David 

Phillips Lord and Arthur Allen in 
serial sketch. 

Literary Digest Topics 
Eno Crime Club 
Dance Music 



© Morton Downey 

@ Fro Joy Novelty Dance Program 

d Mid-week Hymn Sing 

Mixed quartet. 

Amos V Andy 

[3] Mid-week Hymn Sing 
[B] Tastyeast Jesters 

Latham, Carlson and Bonham. 

Q St. Moritz Orchestra 
Chiclets Program 

© St. Moritz Orchestra 
[4] Niagara-Hudson Program 

Dramatic sketch, orchestra. 

[1 Phil Cook 

[4] Niagara-Hudson Program 

IP1 Friendly Five Footnotes 

Orchestra direction, Del Lumpe. 

© Daddy and Rollo 

Humorous sketch. 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:00 — Tony's Scrap-book. 

8:45 — Morning Minstrels. 
10:00 — Radio Home-makers. 
10:45 — Barbara Gould. 
11:30 — Unccda Bakers. 
11:45 — Peter Pan Forecasts. 

2:30 — American School of Air. 

3:00 — Rhythm Ramblers. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:00 — Ccresota Program. 
10:15 — Master Gardner. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

2:30 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30 — La Forge Bcrumen Musical. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

8:15 — Chats with Peggy Winthrop. 
10:00 — Libby, McNeil & Libby. 
11:30 — Odorono Program. 
12:00 — Mike and Herman. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

1:30 — George, the Lava Man. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO LOCAL PROGRAMS 

N News S Sports 

O Educational T Dramatic 

P Children's V Variety 

feature W Comic 

R Religious X On the air 



M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religions 
M 5. Novelty 



M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 

M Variety 



M 


arch, 1931 










W HAT' 


S 


O N 


THE 


All 






















Page 27 


E.S.T 

8 


CHAIN PROGRAMS 
O Mary Charles 
© Literary Digest Topics 
[TJ Fleischmann Hour 

Rudy Yallee and his orchestra. 

g| The First Nighter 

Dramatic sketch. 

ffl Fleischmann Hour 
gj The First Nighter 
© Barbasol Program 

Barber-shop quartet. 

© Kaltenborn Edits the News 

ffl Fleischmann Hour 
[5] Salada Salon Orchestra 

Direction, Nathaniel Shilkret. 

[TJ Fleischmann Hour 

[5] Salada Salon Orchestra 

© The Hamilton Watchman 

Dramatic sketch. 


C.S.T. 

7 

15 
30 

45 

8 

30 

9 

30 

10 

30 
11 

30 


March . 5 . 12 . 19 . 26 ... THURSDAY 


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EASTERN TIME 




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WBT CHARLOTTE 1080 N.C. 




A Irene Beasley 

B Old Gold Character Readings 

Lorna Fantin. 

[U Arco Birthday Party 

Soloists; the Rondoliere and string 
ensemble; direction, Ludwig Lau- 
rier. 

\&\ Blackstone Plantation 

Frank Crumit and Julia Sanderson; 
orchestra direction, Jack Shilkret. 

\3\ Jack Frost's Melody Moments 

Orchestra direction, Eugene Or- 
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[7] Maxwell House Ensemble 

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direction, Don Voorhees. 

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WKY OKLA. CITY 900 
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tra 

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Direction, B. A Rolfe. 

[4] Echoes of the Opera 

[TJ Lucky Strike Orchestra 

[A] Clara, Lu and Em 
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[B] Amos 'n' Andy 

(First 15 min J 

[3] Duke Ellington's Orchestra 
[5l Slumber Music 
© Dance Music 


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E. S. 

fi:30 
6:30 
6:45 
7:00 
7:00 
7:00 


NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 7 
T. Subtract 1 hour for C S. T., 2 7 
for \1. S. T. 7 
—Uncle Bob, KYW. 7 
—Dog Club, WLW. t 
— Little Orphan Annie. WGN. t 
—Philips Flyers, KMOX. f 
— Gene and Glenn, W'TAM. S 
— Punch and Judy Show, WGN. '. 


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Page 28 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



FRIDAY 



March 



6 . 13 



20 



27 



EASTERN TIME 


4 


30 


5 


30 


6 


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30 


45 


7 


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E.S.T 

4 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



*On A : r Part Time. 



15 



30 



45 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
ffl Dancing Melodies 

B Radio Guild 

Famous play with guest star. 

O Curtis Institute of Music 

D Curtis Institute of Music 

(First 15 min.) 

E Rhythm Ramblers 

Nat Brusiloff and orchestra. 

ffl Dancing Melodies 

[3] Radio Guild 



B The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

[4] Tetley Program 
Light Opera Gems 

Direction, Chamnon Collinge. 

F Light Opera Gems 

(First 15 min.) 

G Tony's Scrap-book 

(Second 15 min.) 

[A] Benjamin Moore Triangle 

(First 15 min.) 

B Tea Timers 

(Second 15 min.) 

B Program [A] Followed by 

B Program [A] Followed by 
Rex Cole Mountaineers 

B Stock Market Reports 



ffl The World in Music 

Pierre Key. 

ffl Raising Junior 

Serial, domestic skit. 

© Winegar's Barn Orchestra 

© Winegar's Barn Orchestra 

B Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

B Smith Bailew's Orchestra 

B Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra 

[9] Sundial Bonnie Laddies 

© Winegar's Barn Orchestra 

© Eno Crime Club 

Q To Be Announced 

B Uncle Abe and David 

Rural sketch with Lord and Allen. 

[A] Literary Digest Topics 



B Major Bowes' Family 

Soloists: orchestra direction, Yasha 
Bunchuk. 

1] Amos 'n' Andy 

O Morton Downey 

American Mutual Program 

B Major Bowes' Family 

[C] Boscul Moments 

Mme. Alda and Frank La Forge. 

B Major Bowes' Family 

[D] Phil Cook 

@ To Be Announced 
O The World's Business 

Dr. Julius Klein. 

B Major Bowes' Family 
E Brownbilt Footlights 

Vornl trio : orchestra direction, Phil 
Spitalney. 



C.S.T. 

3 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:45— Old Dutch Girl. 
10:15 — Crumit and Sanderson. 
11:00 — Emily Post. 
11:15 — Winifred Carter. 
11:30— Mrs. John S. Rcilly. 
11:45 — Beatrice Herford. 

2:30 — American School of Air. 

3:00 — U. S. Service Band. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45— A. & P. Program. 
10:00 — National Home Hour. 
10:15 — Mister Jupiter Pluvius. 
10:30 — Betty Crocker. 
1 1 :00 — National Music Appreciation. 

3:00 — Child Study Association. 

3:30 — Classic Gems. 



NBC (through WJZ). 
10:00— Libby, McNeil & Libby. 
10:45 — Josephine B. Gibson. 
I 1 :00 — Music Appreciation Hour. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

2:30 — Sunny Side Up. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:00 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO 


LOCAL PROGRAMS 


N News 






S Sports 


O Educational 






T Dramatic 


P Children's 






V Variety 


feature 






W Comic 


R. Religious 






X On the air 


M 1. Band 


M 


6 


Popular 


M 2. Classical 


M 


7 


Symphonic 


M 3. Dance 


M 


8 


Organ 


M 4. Religious 


M 


9 


Semi-classical 


M 5. Novelty 


M 




Variety 



[jfarcft; T031 



"W HAT'S O ?S THE AIR 



Page 29 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
[T| Cities Service Concert 

The Cavaliers; Jessica Dragonette; 
Leo O'Rourke; orchestra direction, 
Eosario Bourdon. 

[3] Nestle's Program 

Orchestra direction, Xat Brusiloff. 

O Toscha Seidel 

© Literary Digest Topics 

© Pertussin Playboys 

Brad Brown and Al Llewelyn. 

[T] Cities Service Concert 

[3] Nestle 's Program 

Q] Cities Service Concert 

[4] Le Trio Morgan 

© The Dutch Masters 

© The Dutch Masters 

[TJ Cities Service Concert 

[5j Natural Bridge Dancing Class 

Arthur Murray and orchestra; direc- 
tion, Lewis Graeme. 



The Clicquot Club 

Orchestra direction, Harry Reser. 

The Interwoven Pair 

Billy Jones and Ernie Hare; orches- 
tra direction, Will C. Perry. 

True Story Hour 

Dramatized story. 

True Story Hour 
Enna Jettick Songbird 

(First 15 min.) 

Two Troupers 

fSciond 15 min.) 
Marcella Shields and Helene Hardin. 

Program [A] Followed by [B] 
Armour Program 

Mixed chorus; orchestra direction, 
Josef Koestner. 



C. S.T, 

7 



March 



6 



13 



20 . 27 



FRIDAY 



15 

30 
45 



O 
O 



m 



[T1 Crime Prevention Hour 

For three wc.-ks, then, 

Eastman Kodak Hour 

Beginning March 27. 

[4] Armstrong Quakers 

Lois Bennett; Mary Hopple; male 
quartet; orchestra direction, Don 
Voorhees. 

© Gypsy Trail 

Emery Deutsth and orchestra, to l>e 
replaced on and after March 13 by 

Radio Follies 
© Nit Wit Hour 
[2] RKO Theater of the Air 

Orchestra direction, Milton Schwara* 
wald ; film; vaudeville; radio stars. 

[A] Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous skit. 



[3] Vincent Lopez Orchestra 

[C] Amos V Andy 

[5] Slumber Music 

© Noble Sissle and Orchestra 

© Romanelli and King Edward 

Orchestra from Toronto. 

[3) Vincent Lopez Orchestra 
[F] Vincent Lopez Orchestra 

(Second 15 min.) 

[51 Slumber Music 



[JJ Johnnie Hamp's Orchestra 
[2] Florence Richardson's Orchestra 
© Dance Music from New York 
© Nocturne 

Ann I. oaf nt the organ. 

5J Johnnie Hamp's Orchestra 
[3] Palais d'Or Orchestra 



8 



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9 30 


10 30 


11 


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12 


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4 


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5 


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6 


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7 


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45 


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10 


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11 


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CENTRAL TIME 


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#On Air Part Tim* 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
E. S. T. Subtract I liour (or C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:00 — Topsy Turvy Time, WMAO. 
6:30— Uncle Bob, KYW. 
6:45 — little Orphan Annie. W'GN. 
7:00 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:10— Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 
7:30 — Bcrnicc and Thclma, WXYZ. 



8:00 Old Pappy, Wl S. 

8:00 — The l»n ProfcHOTI, W'HAS. 

R:*0 Min Line, Mrn. W\ S. 

9:no HcatroUtown, WIW. 

9:00 — The German Band, WIS). 

9:00— The Prairie President, WLS. 

9:4S— McGucrny and F undhcrg, WCCO. 
10:00— Mexican Trio, \i'OR. 
10:00 — Kingtastc Sonneteer'.. 



10:00- I.elcwcr I ads, VBBM. 

10:00- Canadian Pacific ( "inert. CKGW. 

10:00— Musical Travelogue, \\ l.NR. 

10:45— Bob Ncwh'all, Wl « . 

11:00 — Witching Hour. WKRC. 

1 1:00— Sohio Night ( tub, Wl W. 

I 1:10— Warren I'.rown (-.ports), KYW. 
11:15 — Old Wagon Tongue — drama of Old 
West. KOA. 



1:20 Hcrr Louie and Weasel, WGN. 

1 :J0 Si ayne Kmt, KVW . 

1 :J0 Dan and Sylvia, WMAQ. 

1:10 Mike and Herman. WI.NR. 

2:00 Dance Music, WMAO. 

2:00— Air Vaudeville. Wl NR. 

2:00— Spitalny's Orchestra, KYW. 

2:15 — Around the Town, WBBM. 

2:00 — Hamp's Congress Orchestra, KYW. 



Page 30 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



SATURDAY 



March 



14 . 21 



28 



EASTERN TIME 


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CENTRAL TIME 


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15 



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45 



*On Air Part Time. 



15 



30 



45 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Q Ann Leaf at Organ 
ffl Classic Gems 
IU Sisters of the Skillet 

Song and dialogue. (First 15 min.) 

[D] Pacific Feature Program 

From San Francisco. (Second 15 
min.) 

E Program [C] Followed by [5] 
\2\ Song Shoppe 

Mildred Hunt, Landt Trio. 

[5l Pacific Feature Program 
© Spanish Serenade 

Vincent Sorey and orchestra. 

A Dr. Clark's French Lesson 

B Orchestra Music from New York 

City 
LU The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

(Gj Peter van Steeden's Orchestra 

(First 15 min.) 

[R] Jolly Junketeer 



C.S.T. 



Children's program, 
min.) 



(Second 15 



E Program [G] Followed by 01 

[Al Tea Timers 

LU Program [A] Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 
[J] Blue Aces . 

Dance band. 

[R] Junior Detectives 

Children's dramatic show. 

Program [j] Followed by [K] 
B Orchestra from New York City 
C Junior Literary Guild 
© Tony's Scrap-book 

O Ted Husing's Sport Slants 

(TJ Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

ffl Raising Junior 

Domestic skit. 

© Ted Husing's Sport Slants 
ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
LU Smith Ballew's Orchestra 
ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
[U Smith Ballew 's Orchestra 
Q Paul Tremaine's Orchestra 
Q Eno Crime Club 
Q To Be Announced 
\2\ Uncle Abe and David 

Phillips Lord and Arthur Allen in 
rural sketch. 

[9] Literary Digest Briefs 

[3] Rodeheaver Sing 

[A] Amos V Andy 
© Morton Downey 

Romance of American Industry 
[4] Laws that Safeguard Society 

Dean Gleason L. Archer. 

[B] Tastyeast Jesters 

Lotham, Carleson, Bonham, in jest 
and song. 

[5] Snoop and Peep 

Demon Dee-tect-ives. 

[5] Rise of the Goldbergs 

Humorous sketch. 

Ritz Carlton Hotel Orchestra 

Ritz Carlton Hotel Orchestra 
\6\ High Road of Adventure 

Gilbert E. Gable. 

[5] Pickard Family 

Southern folk songs. 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



6 

15 

30 

45 



CBS. 
10:30 — New World Salon Orchestra. 
11:00 — Land o' Make Believe. 
11:30 — Columbia Revue. 
12:00 — Paul Tremaine's Orchestra. 

2:00 — Columbia Artist Recital. 

2:15 — National Democratic Club. 

3:30 — The Four Clubmen. 

3:30 — Saturday Syncopators. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:15— Emily Post. 
10:30 — Cooking Travelogue. 
11:15- — Radio Household Institute. 
11:30 — Keys to Happiness. 

1 :45 — league for Industrial Democracy. 

3 :30 — Marionettes. 



NBC (through WJZ). 
8:15 — Chats with Peggy Winthrop. 
8:30 — Vermont Lumber Jacks. 
8:45 — A. & P. Program. 
9:45 — Miracles of Magnolia. 
12:30— National Home and Farm. 
1:30 — Keystone Chronicle. 
2:00 — Stock Market Reports. 
3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO 


LOCAL PROGRAMS 


N News 






S Sports 


Educational 






T Dramatic 


P Children's 






V Variety 


feature 






W Comic 


R Religious 






X On the air 


M 1. Band 


M 


B 


Popular 


M 2. Classical 


M 


7 


Symphonic 


M 3. Dance 


M 


S 


Organ 


M 4. Religious 


M 


9 


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M 5. Novelty 


M 




Variety 



•March. 1031 



WHAT'S ON T H K AIR 



Page 31 



ffl 



© 

© 
© 



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CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Webster Frogram 

Weber and Fields. 

Dixies Circus 

Drama of circus life and circus 
band. 

Ben Alley and Ann Leaf 

Literary Digest Briefs 
Ben Alley and Ann Leaf 
Radiotron Varieties 

"Bugs" Baer; soloists; orchestra 
direction, William Daly. 

Rin-Tin-Tin Thriller 

Dramatizations. 

To Be Announced 
Fuller Man 

Earle Spicer, Handy Boys, Tee 
La unburst, Don Voorhees' orches- 
tra. 

Early Bookworm 

Alexander Woolcott. 

Fletcher Henderson's Orchestra 
To Be Announced 

Fuller Man 



P J - March 



14 



21 



28 



SATURDAY 



£H General Electric Hour 

Symphony orchestra ; direction Wal- 
ter Damrosch • Floyd Gibbons. 

UH The Campus 

Adventures of a Freshman. 

© Around the Samovar 

Russian music. 

© National Radio Forum 

From Washington. 

(9] Vapex Musical Doctors 

Clyde Doerr, Geo. Greer, Chas. Mae;- 
nanti; orchestra direction, Milton 
Bettenberg. 

@] General Electric Hour 



Q Hank Simmons' Show Boat 

Old-time melodrama. 

[TJ Lucky Strike Dance Orchestra 

Direction, B. A. Rolfe. 

[2] Cuckoo 

Burlesque skit. 

[E] Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous skit. (First 1.5 min.) 

[F] Aunt Lulu's Adventures 

Humorous skit. (Second 15 min.) 

[0 Program [E] Followed by [F] 

[TJ Lucky Strike Orchestra 

© Hank Simmons' Show Boat 

[A) Troubadour of the Moon 

Lannie Ross and string Irio. (First 
I ."> min.) 

[Bj Henry Busse's Orchestra 
(Second IS min.) 

[C] Program [A] Followed by [B] 
[3] Slumber Music 

[G] Amos 'n' Andy 

Shoreman Hotel Orchestra 
From Washington* 

Royal Canadians 

Direction, Ouj l.nmbardo. 

[B] Henry Busse's Orchestra 

(First 16 min.) 

|D] Little Jack Little 

Songs and patter. (Second 15 min.) 

g] Program [Bj Followed by [Q 
[5] Slumber Music 

O Lown's Biltmore Orchestra 
[TJ Smith Ballew's Orchestra 
(H Phil Spitalny's Orchestra 
@ Nocturne 

Ann Heaf at the organ. 

[TJ Smith Ballew's Orchestra 
ID Phil Spitalny's Orchestra 



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NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
E. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:00— Ft. Snclling Band, WCCO. 
6:00— Air Juniors. WF.NR. 
6:30— Hydrox Party, KYW. 
6:30— Elementary Spanish, WMAQ. 
6:30— Ri K Kernel, WF.NR. 
7:30— Hal Tottcn (sports), WMAQ- 



7:30- Crotley Saturday Night, WLW, 
T., 2 WGBS and KQV. 

7:30— Herald Examiner drama, KYW. 
8:00— Adam and Eve, WXYZ. 
8:30— Footlitt Follicj, WMAQ. 
8:45— Musical Minutes. WKRC. 
9:00— Pat Flanigan, WBBM. 
9:00 — Around the Mclodcon, WBAl,. 
9:00 — Murphy Minstrels, WLS. 



9:15— Sports Review. WBBM. 
9:30— Boxing Matches. WGBS, 
9:30— Scott Furriers' Club, WEAN. 

10:00— Grand Ol' Oprv. WSM. 

10:00— Wide"* Corn Huskers, C KGW. 

10:00 — Simm's Singers. WFAA. 

11:00— King Edward Band, WLW. 

11:00— Far North Program, KDKA. 

11:20 — Hcrr I ouic and Weasel. WGN. 



11:30— National Barn Dance, WLS. 

11:30— Moonbeams, WOR. 

11:30— Wayne King. KYW. 

12:00— Belle of Old Kentucky, WHAS. 

12:00- DanCC Music, WMAQ. 
12:15— Around the Town, WBBM. 
12:30— The Doodlesockera, WLW. 

1:00— Dance Frolic., Wl NR. 
2:00 — Congress Orchestra, KYW. 



Page 32 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 193 1 



North American Broadcasting Stations 

Stations by Call Letters Revised to February 1, 1931 

(Figures in Parentheses Denote Power Now Used) 



KBGZ York, Neb. (500) _. 930 KIT 

KBHB Kennett, Mo. (250) 1230 KJBS 

KBPS Portland, Ore. (100) 1420 KJR 

KBTM Paragould, Ark. (100) 1200 KLCN 

KCRC Enid, Okla. (100)..._ 1370 KLO 

KCKJ Jerome, Ariz. (100) 1310 KLPM 

KDB Santa Barbara, Calif. (100)1500 KLRA 

KDFN Casper, Wyo. (100) 1210 KLS 

KDKA Pittsburgh, Pa. (50000) 980 KLX 

KDLR Devil's Lake, N. D. (100). .1210 KXZ 

KDYL Salt Lake City, Utah (1000)1290 KMA 

KECA Los Angeles, Calif. (1000)..1430 KMAC 

KELW Burbank, Calif. (500) 780 KMBC 

KEX Portland, Ore. (5000) 1180 KMED 

KFAB Lincoln, Neb. (5000) 770 KMIC 

KFBB Great Palls, Mont. (1000).. ..1280 KMJ 

KFBK Sacramento, Calif. (100) 1310 KMLB 

KFBL Everett, Wash. (50) 1370 KMMJ 

KTDM Beaumont, Tex. (500) 560 KMO 

KFDY Brookings, S. D. (500) 550 KMOX 

KFEL Denver, Col. (500) 920 KMPC 

KFEQ St Joseph, Mo. (2500) 680 KMTR 

KFGQ Boone, la. (100) 1310 KNX 

KFH Wichita, Kan. (1000) 1300 KOA 

KFI Los Angeles, Calif. (5000).. 640 KOAC 

KFIO Spokane, Wash. (100) 1120 KOB 

KFITJ Juneau, Alaska (10) 131!0 KOCW 

KFIZ Fond du Lac, Wis. (100). ...1420 KOH 

KFJB Marshalltown, la. (250) 1200 KOIL 

KFJF Oklahoma City, Okla. (5000)1480 KOIN 

KFJI Astoria. Ore. (100) 1370 KOL 

KFJM Grand Forks, N. D. (100)....1370 KOMO 

KFJR Portland, Ore. (500) 1300 KONO 

KFJY Fort Dodge, la. (100): 1310 KOOS 

KFJZ Fort Worth, Tex. (100) 1370 KORE 

KFKA Greeley, Col. (500) 880 KOY 

KFKB Milford, Kan. (5000) 1050 KPCB 

KFKTJ Lawrence, Kan. (500) 1220 KPJM 

KFLV Rockford, 111. (500) 1410 KPO 

KFLX Galveston, Tex. (100) 1370 KPOF 

KFMX Northfield, Minn. (1000) 1250 KPPG 

KFNF Shenandoah, la. (500) 890 KPQ 

KFOR Lincoln, Neb. (100) 1210 KPRC 

KFOX Long Beach, Calif. (1000). .1250 KPSN 

KFPL Dublin, Tex. (100) 1310 KPWF 

KFPM Greenville, Tex. (15) 1310 KQV 

KFPW Ft. Smith, Ark. (50) 1340 KQW 

KFPY Spokane, Wash. (1000) 1340 KRE 

KFQD Anchorage, Alaska (100). ...1230 KREG 

KFQU Holy City, Calif. (100) 1420 KRGV 

KFQW Seattle, Wash. (100) 1420 KRLD 

KFRC San Francisco, Calif. (1000) 610 KRMD 

KFRU Columbia, Mo. (500) 630 KROW 

KFSD San Diego, Calif. (500) 600 KRSC 

KFSG Los Angeles, Calif. (500)....1120 KSAC 

KFUL Galveston, Tex. (500) 1290 KSCJ 

KFUM Colorado Sp'gs, Col. (1000)1270 KSD 

KFUO Clayton, Mo. (500) 550 KSEI 

KFUP Denver, Col. (100) 1310 KSL 

KFVD Culver City, Calif. (250).... 1000 KSMR 

KFVS Cape Girardeau, Mo. (100). .1210 KSO 

KFWB Hollywood, Calif. (1000).... 950 KSOO 

KFWF St. Louis, Mo. (100) 1200 KSTF 

KFWI San Francisco, Calif. (500) 930 KTAB 

KFXD Nampa, Ida. (50) 1420 KTAP 

KFXF Denver, Col. (250) 920 KTAR 

KFXJ Edgewater, Col. (50) 1310 KTAT 

KFXM S. Bernardino, Calif. (100)1210 KTBI 

KFXR Oklahoma City, Okla. (100)1310 KTBR 

KFXY Flagstaff, Ariz. (100) 1420 KTBS 

KFYO Abilene, Tex. (100) 1420 KTHS 

KFYR Bismarck, N. D. (1000) 550 KTLO 

KGA Spokane, Wash. (5000) 1470 KTM 

KGAR Tucson, Ariz. (100) 1370 KTNT 

KGB San Diego, Calif. (250) 1330 KTRH 

KGBU Ketchikan, Alaska (500).-. 900 KTSA 

KGBX St Joseph, Mo. (100) 1310 KTSL 

KGBZ York, Neb. (500) 939 KTSM 

KGCA Decorah, la. (50) 1270 KTW 

KGCI San Antonio, Tex. (100) 1370 KUJ 

KGCR Watertown, S. D. (100) 1210 KUOA 

KGCU Mandan, N. D. (100) 1200 KUSD 

KGCX Wolf Point, Mont. (100)....1310 KUT 

KGDA Mitchell, S. D. (100) 1370 KVI 

KGDE Fergus Falls, Minn. (100)....1200 KVL 

KGDM Stockton, Calif. (250) 1100 KVOA 

KGDY Huron, S. D. (100) 1200 KVOO 

KGEF Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1300 KVOS 

KGEK Yuma, Col. (50) 1200 KWCR 

KGER Long Beach, Calif. (1000). ...1360 KWEA 

KGEW Fort Morgan, Col. (100) 1200 KWG 

KGEZ Kalispell, Mont. (100) 1310 KWJJ 

KGFF Alva, Okla. (100) 1420 KWK 

KGFG Oklahoma City, Okla. (100)1370 KWKC 

KGFI Corpus Christi, Tex. (100). .1500 KWKH 

KGFJ Los Angeles, Calif. (100)....1200 KWLC 

KGFK Moorhead, Minn. (50) 1500 KWSC 

KGFL Raton, N. M. (50) 1370 KWWG 

KGFW Ravenna, Neb. (100) 1310 KXA 

KGFX Pierre, S. D. (200) 580 KXL 

KGGC San Francisco, Calif. (100). 1420 KXO 

KGGF Coffevville, Kan. (500) 101|0 KXRO 

KGGM Albuquerque, N. M. (250)....1230 KXYZ 

KGHF Pueblo, Col. (250) 1320 KYA 

KGHI Little Rock, Ark. (100) 1200 KYW 

KGHL Billings, Mont. 950 KZM 

KGIQ Twin Falls, Ida. (250) 1320 WAAF 

KGIR Butte, Mont. (500) 1360 WAAM 

KGIW Trinidad, Col. (100) 1420 WAAT 

KGIX Las Vegas, Nev. (100) 1420 WAAW 

KGIZ Grant City, Mo. (100) 1500 WABC 

KGJF Little Rock, Ark. (250) 890 WABI 

KGKB Brown wood, Tex. (100) 1500 WABZ 

KGKL San Angelo, Tex. (100) 1370 WACO 

KGKO Wichita Kails, Tex. (250).... 570 WADC 

KGKX Sandpoint, Ida. (100) 1420 WAIU 

KGKY Seottsbluff, Ark. (100) 1500 WALR 

KGMB Honolulu, Hawaii (500) 1320 WAPI 

KGMP Elk City, Okla. (100) 1210 WASH 

KGNF North Platte, Neb. (500).... 1430 WAWZ 

KGNO Dodgo Citv, Kan. (100) 1210 WBAA 

KGO San Francisco, Calif. (7500) 790 WBAK 

KGRS Amarillo, Tex. (1000) 1410 WBAL 

KGU Honolulu, Hawaii (1000).... 940 WBAP 

KGVO Missoula, Mont 1420 WBAX 

KGW Portland, Ore. (1000) 620 WBBC 

KGY Lacey, Wash. (10) 1200 WBBM 

KHJ Los Angeles, Calif. (1000).. 900 WBBR 

KHQ Spokane, Wash. (1000) 590 WBBZ 

KICK Red Oak, la. (100) 1420 WBCM 

KID Idaho Falls, Ida. (250) 1320 WBEN 

KXDO Boise, Ida. (1000) 1250 WBGF 



Yakima, Wash. (50) 1310 WBIG 

San Francisco, Calif. (100)1070 WBIS 

Seattle, Wash. (5000) 970 WBMS 

Blytheville, Ark. (50) 1290 WBOW 

Ogden, Utah (500) 1400 WBRC 

Minot, N. D. (100) 1420 WBRE 

Little Rock, Ark. (1000)....1390 WBSO 

Oakland, Calif. (250) 1440 WBT 

Oakland, Calif. (500) 880 WBTM 

Denver, Col. (1000) 560 WBZ 

Shenandoah, la. (500) _. 930 WBZA 

San Antonio, Tex 1370 WCAC 

Kansas Citv, Mo. (1000).... 950 WCAD 

Medford, Ore. (50) 1310 WCAE 

Inglewood, Calif 1120 WCAH 

Fresno, Calif. (100) 1210 WCAJ 

Monroe, La. (50) 1200 WCAL 

Clay Center, Neb. (1000).... 740 WCAM 

Tacoma, Wash. (500) 860 WCAO 

St. Louis, Mo. (50000) 1090 WCAP 

Beverly Hills, Calif. (500).. 710 WCAT 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000).. 570 WCAU 

Hollywood, Calif. (5000)....1050 WCAX 

Denver, Col. (12500) 830 WCAZ 

Corvallis, Ore. (1000) 550 WCBA 

State College, N. M. (20000)1180 WCBD 

Chickasha, Okla. (250) 1400 WCBM 

Reno, Nev. (500) 1380 WCBS 

Council Bluffs, la. (1000)... .1260 WCCO 

Portland, Ore. (1000).... 940 WCDA 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 1270 WCFL 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 920 WCGTJ 

San Antonio, Tex. (100) 1370 WCHI 

Marshfield, Ore. (100) 1370 WCKY 

Eugene, Ore. (100) 1420 WCLB 

Phoenix, Ariz. (500) 1390 WCLO 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 650 WCLS 

Prescott, Ariz. (100) 1500 WCMA 

San Francisco, Calif. (5000) 680 WCOA 

Denver, Col. (500) 880 WCOC 

Pasadena, Calif. (50) 1210 WCOD 

Wenatchee, Wash. (50) 150O WCOH 

Houston, Tex. (1000) 920 WCRW 

Pasadena, Calif. (1000) 1360 WCSC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (10000)1490 WCSH 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (500) 1380 WDAE 

San Jose, Calif. (500) 1010 WDAF 

Berkeley, Calif. (100) 1370 WDAG 

Santa Ana, Calif. (100) 1500 WDAH 

Harlingen, Tex. (500) 1260 WDAY 

Dallas, Tex. (10000) 1040 WDBJ 

Shreveport, La. (50) 1310 WDBO 

Oakland, Calif. (500) 930 WDEL 

Seattle, Wash. (50) 1120 WDGY 

Manhattan, Kan. (500) 580 WDIX 

Sioux City, la. (1000) 1330 WDOD 

St. Louis, Mo. (500) 550 WDRC 

Pocatello, Ida. (250) 900 WDSU 

Salt Lake City, Utah (5000)1130 WDWF 

Santa Maria, Calif. (100).... 1200 WDZ 

Clarinda, la. (500) 1380 WEAF 

Sioux Falls, S. D. (2000).... 1110 WEAI 

St. Paul, Minn. (10000) 1460 WEAN 

Oakland, Calif. (1000) 560 WEAO 

San Antonio, Tex. (100).... 1420 WEBC 

Phcenix, Ariz. (500) 620 WEBQ 

Ft. Worth, Tex. (1000) 1240 WEBR 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1300 WEDC 

Portland, Ore. (500) 1300 WEDH 

Shreveport, La. (1000) 1450 WEEI 

Hot Springs, Ark. (10000). .1040 WEHC 

Houston, Tex. (100) 1310 WEHS 

Los Angeles, Calif. (500).... 780 WELK 

Muscatine, la. (5000) 1170 WELL 

Houston, Tex. (500) 1120 WENR 

San Antonio, Tex. (1000)....1290 WEPS 

Shreveport, La. (100) 1310 WEVD 

El Paso, Tex. (100) 1310 WEW 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 1270 WEXL 

Longview, Wash. (100) 1500 WFAA 

Fayetteville, Ark. (1000). ...1390 WFAN 

Vermilion, S. D. (500) 890 WFBC 

Austin, Tex. (100) 1500 WFBE 

Tacoma, Wash. (1000) 760 WFBG 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 1370 WFBL 

Tucson, Ariz. (500) 1260 WFBM 

Tulsa, Okla. (5000) _ 1140 WFBR 

Bellingham, Wash. (100) ...1200 WFDF 

Cedar Rapids, la. (100) 1310 WFDV 

Shreveport, La. (100) 1210 WFDW 

Stockton, Calif. (100) 1200 WFI 

Portland, Ore. (500) 1060 WFIW 

St. Louis, Mo. (1000) 1350 WFLA 

Kansas City, Mo. (100) 1370 WFOX 

Shreveport, La. (10000) 850 WGAL 

Decorah, la. (100) 1270 WGAR 

Pullman, Wash. (500) 1220 WGBB 

Brownsville, Tex. (500) 1260 WGBC 

Seattle, Wash. (500) 570 WGBF 

Portland, Ore. (100) 1420 WGBI 

El Centro, Calif. (100) 1500 WGBS 

Aberdeen, Wash. (75) 1310 WGCM 

Houston, Tex. (100) 1420 WGCP 

San Francisco, Calif. (1000)1230 WGES 

Chicago, 111. (10000) 1020 WGH 

Haywood, Calif. (100) 1370 WGL 

Chicago, 111. (500) 920 WGN 

Newark. N. J. (1000) 1250 WGR 

Jersey City, N. J. (300) 940 WGST 

Omaha, Neb. (500) 660 WGY 

New York, N. Y. (5000) 860 WHA 

Bangor, Me. (100) 1200 WHAD 

New Orleans, La. (100) 1200 WHAM 

Waco, Tex. (1000) 1240 WHAP 

Akron, O. (1000) 1320 WHAS 

Columbus, O. (500) 640 WHAT 

Zanesville, O. (100) 1210 WHAZ 

Birmingham, Ala. (5000). ...1140 WHB 

Grand Rapids, Mich. (500). 1270 WHBC 

New York City 1350 WHBD 

Lafayette, Ind. (500) 1400 WHBF 

Harrisburg, Pa. (500) 1430 WHBL 

Baltimore, Md. (10000) 1060 WHBQ 

Ft. Worth, Tex. (50000).... 800 WHBU 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (100) 1210 WHBY 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (500) 1400 WHDF 

Chicago, 111. (25000) 770 WHDH 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (1000) 1300 WHDI 

Ponca City, Okla. (100) 1200 WHDL 

Bay City, Mich. (500) 1410 WHEC 

Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) 900 WHFC 

Glenn Falls, N. Y. (50) 1370 WHIS 



Greensboro, N. C 1440 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 1230 

Hackensack, N. J. (250)....1450 

Terre Haute, Ind. (100) 1310 

Birmingham, Ala. (500) 930 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (100) 1310 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. (250) 920 

Charlotte, N. C. (5000) 1080 

Danville, Va. (100) 1370 

Springfield, Mass. (15000).. 990 

Boston, Mass. (500) 990 

Storrs, Conn. (250) 600 

Canton, N. Y. (500) 1220 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (1000) 1220 

Columbus, O. (500) _.1430 

Lincoln, Neb. (500) 590 

Northfield, Minn. (1000) ....1250 

Camden, N. J. (500) 1280 

Baltimore, Md. (250) 600 

Asbury Park, N. J. (500)... .1280 

Rapid City, S. D. (100) 1200 

Philadelphia, Pa. (10000). ...1170 

Burlington, Vt. (100) 1200 

Carthage, 111. (50) 1070 

AUentown, Pa. (250) 1440 

Zion, 111. (5000) 1080 

Baltimore, Md. (100) 1370 

Springfield, 111. (100) 1210 

Minneapolis, Minn. (7500).. 810 

New York City (250) 1350 

Chicago, III. (1500) _ 970 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (500) 1400 

Chicago, 111 -.1490 

Covington, Ky. (5000) 1490 

Long Beach, N. Y. (100) 1500 

Janesville, Wis. (100) 1200 

Joliet, 111. (100) _ 1310 

Culver, Ind. (500) 1400 

Pensacola, Fla. (500). 1340 

Meridian, Miss. (500) 880 

Harrisburg, Pa. (100) 1200 

Yonkers, N. Y. (100) 1210 

Chicago, 111. (100) 1210 

Charleston, S. C. (500) 1360 

Portland, Me. (1000) 940 

Tampa, Fla. (1000) 1220 

Kansas City, Mo. (1000).... 610 

Amarillo, Tex. (250) 1410 

EI Paso, Tex. (100) 1310 

Fargo, N. D. (1000) 940 

Roanoke, Va. (250) 930 

Orlando, Fla. (500) 1120 

Wilmington, Del. (250) 1120 

Minneapolis, Minn. (1000). .1180 

Tupelo, Miss. (100) 1500 

Chattanooga, Tenn. (1000). .1280 

Hartford, Conn. (500) 1330 

New Orleans', La. (1000) ...1250 

Providence, R. I. (100) 1210 

Tuscola, 111. (100) 1070 

New York City (50000) 660 

Ithaca, N. Y. (500) 1270 

Providence, R. I. (250) 780 

Columbus, O. (750) 570 

Superior, Wis. (1000) 1290 

Harrisburg, 111. (100) 1210 

Buffalo, N. Y. (100) 1310 

Chicago, 111. (100) 1210 

Erie, Pa. (100) 1420 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 590 

Emory, Va. (100) 1200 

Evanston, 111. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. flOO).— 1370 
Battle Creek, Mich. (50). ...1420 

Chicago, 111. (50000) 870 

Worcester, Mass (100) 1200 

New York City (500) 1300 

St. Louis, Mo. (1000) 760 

Royal Oak, Mich. (50) 1310 

Dallas, Tex. (50000) 800 

Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 610 

Knoxville. Tenn. (50) 1200 

Cincinnati, O. (100) 1200 

Altoona, Pa. (100) 1310 

Syracuse, N. Y. (1000) 1360 

Indianapolis, Ind. (1000).... 1230 

Baltimore, Md. (500) 1270 

Flint, Mich. (100) 1310 

Rome, Ga. (100) 1370 

Talladega, Ala. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 560 

Hopkinsville, Ky. (1000).... 940 

Clearwater, Fla. (1000) 620 

Brooklvn, N. Y. (250) 1400 

Lancaster, Pa. (100) 1310 

Cleveland, O. (500). .._ 1450 

Freeport, N. Y. (100) 1210 

Memphis, Tenn. (500) 1430 

Evansville, Ind. (500) 630 

Scranton, Pa. (250) 880 

New York Citv (250) 600 

Oulfport, Miss. (100) 1210 

Newark, N. J. (250) 1250 

Chicago, 111. (500) 1360 

Newport News, Va. (100).. .1310 

Ft. Wayne, Ind. (100) 1370 

Chicago, 111. (25000) 720 

Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) 550 

Atlanta, Ga. (250) 890 

Schenectady, N. Y. (50000) 790 

Madison, Wis. (750) 940 

Milwaukee, Wis. (250) 1120 

Rochester, N. Y. (5000) 1150 

New York Citv (1000) 1300 

Louisville, Kv. (10000) 820 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100) 1310 

Troy, N. Y. (500) 1300 

Kansas City, Mo. (500) 860 

Canton, O. (10) 1200 

Mt. Ora.b, O. (100) 1370 

Rock Island, 111. (100) 1210 

Sheboygan, Wis. (500) 1410 

Memphis. Tenn. (100) 1370 

Anderson, Ind. (100) 1210 

Green Bav. Wis. (100) 1200 

Calumet, Mich. (100) 1370 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 830 

Minneapolis, Minn. (500) ....1180 
Tupper Lake, N. Y. (10). ...1420 

Rochester, N. Y. (500) 1440 

Cicero, 111. (100) 1420 

Bluefield, W. Va. (250) 1410 



WHK Cleveland, O. (1000) —.1390 

WHN New York City (250) _.1010 

WHO Des Moines, la. (5000) 1000 

WHOM Jersey City, N. J. (500) 1450 

WHP Harrisburg, Pa. (500) 1430 

WIAS Ottumwa, la. (100) 1420 

WIBA Madison, Wis. (500) 1280 

WIBG Elkins Park, Pa. (50) 930 

WIBM Jackson, Mich. (100)..._ 1370 

WIBO Chicago, 111. (1000) _ 560 

WIBR Steubenville, O. (50) _...1420 

WIBU Poynette, Wis. (100) 1310 

WrBW Topeka, Kan. (1000) _... 580 

WIBX Utica, N. Y. (100) 1200 

WICC Bridgeport, Conn. (500) 1190 

WIL St. Louis, Mo. (100) 1200 

WILL Urbana, 111. (250) _... 890 

WILM Wilmington, Del. (100) 1420 

WIOD Miami Beach, Fla. (1000).... 1300 

WIP Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 610 

WIS Columbia, S. C. (500) 1010 

WISJ Beloit, Wis. (500) 780 

WISN Milwaukee, Wis. (250) 1120 

WJAC Johnstown, Pa. (100)..._ 1310 

WJAG Norfolk, Neb. (1000) 1060 

WJAK Marion, Ind. (50) 1310 

WJAR Providence, R. I. (250) 890 

WJAS Pittsburgh, Pa. (1000) 1290 

WJAX Jacksonville, Fla. (1000).... 900 

WJAY Cleveland, O. (500) 610 

WJAZ Chicago, 111. (5000) 1490 

WJBC La Salle, 111. (100) 1200 

WJBI Red Bank, N. J. (100) 1210 

WJBK Detroit, Mich. (50) 1370 

WJBL Decatur, 111. (100) 1200 

WJBO New Orleans, La. (100) 1420 

WJBTJ Lewisburg, Pa. (100) 1210 

WJBW New Orleans, La. (30) 1200 

WJBY Gadsden, Ala. (50) 1210 

WJDX Jackson, Miss. (1000) 1270 

WJJD Mooseheart, HI. (20000) 1130 

WJKS Gary, Ind. (1000) 1360 

WJR Detroit, Mich. (5000) 750 

WJSV Alexandria, Va. (10000) 1460 

WJW Mansfield, O. (100) 1210 

WJZ New York City (30000) 760 

WKAQ San Juan, P. R. (500) 890 

WKAR E. Lansing, Mich. (1000)....1040 

WKAV Laconia, N. H. (100) 1310 

WKBB Joliet, 111. (100) 1310 

WKBC Birmingham, Ala. (100) 1310 

WKBF Indianapolis, Ind. (500) 1400 

WKBH La Crosse, Wis. (1000) 1380 

WKBI Chicago, 111. (100) _1420 

WKBN Youngstown, O. (500) 570 

WKBO Jersey City, N. J. (250) 1450 

WKBQ New York City (250) 1350 

WKBS Galesburg, 111. (100) 1310 

WKBV Connersville, Ind. (100)... .1500 

WKBW Buffalo, N. Y. (5000) _1480 

WKBZ Ludington, Mich. (50)..._ 1500 

WKJC Lancaster, Pa. (100) 1200 

WKRO Cincinnati, O. (500) 550 

WKY Oklahoma City, Okla. (1000) 900 

WKZO Berrien Sp'gs, Mich. (1000) 590 

WLAO Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 1470 

WLAP Louisville, Ky. (100) 1200 

WLB St. Paul, Minn. (1000) 1250 

WLBC Muncie, Ind. (50)..._ 1310 

WLBF Kansas City, Kan. (100)....1420 

WLBG Petersburg, Va. (100) 1200 

WLBL Stevens Point, Wis. (2000) 900 

WLBW Oil City, Pa. (500) 1260 

WLBX Long Is. City, N. Y. (100)..1500 

WLBZ Bangor, Me. (500) 620 

WLCI Ithaca, N. Y. (50) 1210 

WLEX Lexington, Mass. (500) 1410 

WLEY Lexington, Mass. (100) 1370 

WLIT Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 560 

WLOE Boston, Mass. (100) 1500 

WLS Chicago, 111. (5000) 870 

WLSI Providence, R. I. (100) 1210 

WLTH Brooklyn, N. Y. (500) 140C 

WLVA Lynchburg, Va. (100) 1370 

WLW Cincinnati, O. (50000) 700 

WLW1 New York City (5000) 1100 

WMAC Syracuse, N. Y. (250) 570 

WMAK Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) _.1040 

WMAL Washington, D. C. (250).... 630 

WMAQ Chicago, 111. (5000)..._ 670 

WMAZ Macon, Ga. (250) 89« 

WMBA Newport, R. I. (100) 1500 

WMBC Detroit, Mich. (100) 1420 

WMBD Peoria Heights, 111. (500). ...1440 

WMBG Richmond, Va. (100) -...1210 

WMBH Joplin, Mo. (100) 1420 

WMBI Chicago, 111. (5000) 1080 

WMBJ Pittsburgh, Pa. (100) 1500 

WMBO Auburn, N. Y. (100) 1310 

WMBQ Brooklvn, N. Y. (100) 1500 

WMBR Tampa. Fla. (100) _ 1370 

WMC Memphis, Tenn. (500) 780 

WMCA New York Citv. (500) 570 

WMMN Fairmont, W. Va. (250) 890 

WMPC Lapeer. Mich. (100) 1500 

WMRJ Jamaica, N. Y. (100) 1210 

WMSG New York Citv (250) 1350 

WMT Waterloo. la. (500) 600 

WNAC Boston. Mass. (1000) 1230 

WNAD Norman, Okla. (500) _...1010 

WNAX Yankton, S. D. (1000) 570 

WNBF Binghamton, N. Y. (100)....1500 

WNBH New Bedford, Mass. (100). .1310 

WNBO Washington, Pa. (100) 1200 

WNBR Memphis, Tenn. (1000) 1430 

WNBW Carbondale. Pa. (10) 1200 

WNBX Springfield. Vt. (10) 1200 

WNBZ Saranac Lake, N. Y. (50)....1290 

WNJ Newark, N. J. (250) 1450 

WNOX Knoxville, Tenn. (1000) 560 

WNYC New York Citv (500) 570 

WOAI San Antonio, Tex. (50000). .1190 

WOAX Trenton, N. J. (500) 1280 

WOBT Union Citv, Tenn. (100) 1310 

WOBU Charleston, W. Va. (250).... 580 

WOC Davenport, la. (5000) 1000 

WOCL Jamestown, N. Y. (25) 1210 

WODA Paterson. N. J. (1000) 1250 

WODX Mobile, Ala. (500) 1410 

WOI Ames. la. (5000) 640 

WOKO Poughkeepsie, N. Y. (500). .1440 

WOL Washington, D. C. (100) 1310 

WOMT Manitowoc, Wis. (100) 1210 

WOOD Grand Rapids, Mich. (500). .1270 

WOPI Bristol, Tenn. (100) 1500 

WOQ Kansas Citv, Mo. (1000).... 1300 

WOR Newark. N. J. (5000) 710 

WORC Worcester, Mass. (100) 1200 

WOS Jefferson City, Mo. (500).... 630 

WOV New York Citv (1000) 1130 

WOW Omaha, Neb. (1000) 590 

WOWO Ft. Wavne, Ind. ( 10000).... 1160 

WPAD Paducah, Ky. (100) 1420 



March, 1931 



\V HAf'S ON T H K A I 11 



Page 33 



WPAP New York City (250) 1010 

WPAW Pawtucket, R. I. (100) 1210 

WPCO Chicago, 111. (500) 560 

WPCH New York City (500) 810 

WPEN Philadelphia, Pa. (100) 1500 

WPG Atlantic City, N. J. (5000). 1100 

WPOE Patchogue, N. Y. (100) 1370 

WPSC State College, Pa. (500). .1230 

WPTF Raleigh, N. C. (1000) 680 

WQAM Miami, Fla. (1000) 560 

WQAN Scranton, Pa. (250) 880 

WQAO New York City (250) 1010 

WQBC Yicksburg, Miss. (300) .1360 

WQDM St. Albans, Yt. (100) 1370 

WQDX Thomasville, Ga. (50) 1210 

WRAP La Porte, Ind. (100) 1200 

WRAK YVilliamsport, Pa. (50) 1370 

WRAW Heading, Pa. (50) ...1310 

WRAX Philadelphia, Pa. (250)-— 1020 

WRBI Tifton, Ga. (100) _ 1310 

WRBJ Hattiesburg, Miss. (10).... 1370 

WRBL Columbus. Ga. (50) 1200 

WRBQ Greenville, Miss. (100) 1210 

WRBT Wilmington, N. C. (100) 1370 

WRBX Roanoke, Ya. (250).— 1410 

WRC Washington, D. C. (500) 950 

WRDO Augusta, Me. (100) 1370 

WRDW Augusta. Ga. (100) 1500 

WREC Memphis, Tenn. (500) 600 

WREN Lawrence, Kan. (1000) 12210 

WRHM Minneapolis, Minn. (1000). .1250 

WRJN Racine. Wis. (100) 1370 

WRNY New York City (700) 1010 

WROL Knoxville, Tenn. (50) 1310 

WRR Dallas. Tex. (500) 1280 

WRUF Gainesville, Fla. (5000) 830 

WRVA Richmond, Ya. (5000) 1110 

WSAI Cincinnati, O. (500) 1330 

WSAJ Grove City, Pa. (100) 1310 

WSAN Allentown, Pa. (250). 1440 

WSAR Fall River, Mass. (250) 1450 

WSAZ Huntington, W. Ya. (1000) 580 

WSB Atlanta, Ga. (5000) 740 

WSBC Chicago, 111. (100) 1210 

WSBT South Bend. Ind. (500) 1230 

WSEN Columbus, O. (50) 1210 

WSFA Montgomery, Ala. (500) 1410 

WSIX Springfield, Tenn. (100) 1210 

WSJS Winston-Salem, N. C. (100)1310 

WSM Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 650 

WSMB New Orleans. La. (500) 1320 

WSMK Davton, 0. (200) 1380 

WSOC Gastonia. N. C 1210 

WSPA Spartanburg, S. C. (100).. ..1420 



WSPD 

WSSH 

WSUI 

WSUN 

WSVS 

WSYB 

WSYR 

WTAD 

WTAG 

WTAM 

WTAQ 

WTAR 

WTAW 

WTAX 

WTBO 

WTEL 

WTPI 

WTIC 

WTMJ 

WTNT 

WTOC 

WWAE 

WWJ 

WWL 

WWNC 

WWRL 

WWVA 

WXYZ 



CFAC 

CFBO 

CFCA 

CFCF 

CFCH 

CFCN 

CFCO 

CFCT 

CFCY 

CFJC 

CFLC 

CFNB 

CFQC 

CFRB 

CFRC 

CHCA 

CHCK 

CHCS 

CHCT 

CHGS 

CHLS 

CHMA 

CHML 



Toledo, O. (500) 1340 

Boston, Mass. (500) 1410 

Iowa City, la. (500) 880 

St. Petersburg, Fla. (1000) 620 

Buffalo, N. Y. (50) 1370 

Rutland, Yt. (100) 1500 

Syracuse, N. Y. (250) 570 

Quincv, 111. (500) 1440 

Worcester, Mass. (250) 580 

Cleveland, O. (50000) 1070 

Eau Claire. Wis. (1000) 1330 

Norfolk, Ya. (500) 780 

College Station. Tex. (500)1120 

Streator, 111. (50) 1210 

Cumberland, Md. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa 1310 

Toccoa, Ga. (500) 1450 

Hartford. Conn. (50000) 1060 

Milwaukee, Wis. (1000) 620 

Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 1470 

Savannah, Ga. (500) 1260 

Hammond, Ind. (100) 1200 

Detroit, Mich. (1000) 920 

New Orleans, La. (5000).... 850 

Asheville, N. C. (1000) 570 

Woodside, N. Y. (100) 1500 

Wheeli •, W. Ya, (5000).... 1160 
Detroit, Mich. (1000) 1240 

CANADIAN STATIONS 

Calgarv, Alta. (500) 690 

St. John, N. B. (50) 890 

Toronto, Ont. (500) 840 

Montreal, Que. (500) 1030 

Iroquois Falls, Ont, (250). . 600 

Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

Chatham. Ont. (100) 1210 

A'ictoria. B. C. (500) 630 

Charlottetown, P. E. 1.(250) 960 

Kamloops, B. C. (15) 1120 

Prescott. Ont. (50) 1010 

Frederickton, N. B. (50)... .1210 

Saskatoon, Sask. (500) 910 

Toronto, Ont. (4000) t60 

Kingston, Ont. (500) 930 

Calgarv, Alta. (500) 690 

Charlottetown, P. E. I. (30) 960 

Hamilton, Ont. (10) 880 

Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

Summerside, P. E. I. (100). .1120 

Yancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

Edmonton, Alta. (250) 580 

Hamilton, Ont. (50) 880 



CHNS Halifax, N. S. (500) 910 

CHRC Quebec, Que. (100) 880 

CHWC Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

CHWK Chilliwack, B. C. (5) _.1210 

CHYC Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

CJBR Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

CJCA Edmonton, Alta. (500) 930 

CJCB Sydney, N. S. (50) 880 

CJCJ Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

CJGC London, Ont. (500) 910 

CJGX Yorkton. Sask. (500) 630 

CJOC Lethbridge, Alta. (50) 1120 

CJOR Sea Island, B. C. (50) 1210 

CJRM Moose Jaw, Sask. (500) 600 

CJRW Fleming, Sask. (500). 600 

CJSC Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 

CKAC Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

CKCD A'ancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

CKCI Quebec, Que. (22%) 880 

CKCK, Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

CKCL Toronto, Ont. (500) 580 

CKCO Ottawa, Ont. (100) 890 

CKCR Waterloo, Ont. (50) 1010 

CKCV Quebec, Que. (50) 880 

CKFC Yancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

CKGW Toronto, Out, (5000) 690 

CKIC Wolfville, N. S. (50) 930 

CKLC Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

CKMC Cobalt, Ont. (15) 1210 

CKMO Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

CKNC Toronto, Ont, (500) 580 

CKOC Hamilton, Ont. (50) 880 

CKPC Preston, Ont. (25) 1210 

CKPR Midland, Ont. (50) 930 

CKUA Edmonton, Alta. (500) 580 

CKWX Vancouver, B. C. (100) 730 

CKX Brandon, Man. (500) 540 

CKY Winnipeg, Man. (5000) 780 

CNRA Moncton, N. B. (500) 630 

CNRC Ca>lgarv, Alta. (500) 690 

CNRD Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

CNRE Edmonton, Alta. (500) 930 

CNRH Halifax, N. S. (500) 910 

CNRL London, Ont. (500) 910 

CNRM Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

CNRO Ottawa, Ont. (500) 600 

CNRQ Quebec, Que. (50) ..;.. 880 

CNRR Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

CNRS Saskatoon, Sask. (500) 910 

CNRT Toronto, Ont. (500) 840 

CNRV Vancouver, B. C. (500) 1030 

CNRW Winnipeg, Man. (5000) 780 

CNRX Toronto, Ont. (4000) 960 

CPRY Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 



CMBC 

CMBY 

CMBZ 

CMC 

CMCF 

CMCQ 

CMGA 

CMHJ 

CMHC 

CMHD 

CMK 

CMKO 

CMQ 

CMW 

CMX 



HHK 



XFT 

XEQ 

XEA 

XFC 

XEJ 

XEY 

XEB 

XEG 

XEK 

XEN 

XEO 

XER 

XETA 

XEW 

XEX 

XEZ 

XFG 

XFI 

XFX 

XEH 

XET 

XEI 

XEF 

XEV 

XED 

XEL 

XEM 

XES 

XEC 

XETF 

XEU 

XFE 



CUBA 

Havana (150) 1130 

Havana (200) 1405 

Havana (150) 1010 

Havana (500) 840 

Havana (250) 900 

Havana (1000) 955 

Colon (300) 830 

Cienfuegos (200) 1150 

Tuincucu (500) 790 

Chihauhua (250) 920 

Havana (2000) 730 

Santiago (150) 1045 

Havana (150) 1130 

Havana (1000) 590 

Havana (1000) 910 

HAITI 

Port au Prince (1000) 920 

MEXICO 

Chihuahua, (250) 915 

Ciudad Juarez (1000) 750 

Gaudalajara (100) 1200 

Jalapa (350) 805 

Juraz (100) _ 857 

Merida (100) 547 

Mexico City (1000) 1030 

Mexico Citv (2000) 829 

Mexico Citv (100) 1000 

Mexico City (1000) 732 

Mexico Citv (100) 674 

Mexico Citv (100) 894 

Mexico City (1000) 1100 

Mexico Citv (5000) 780 

Mexico City (500) 1190 

Mexico Citv (500) 588 

Mexico City (2000) 638 

Mexico City (1000) 818 

Mexico City (500) 860 

Monterrev (100) 1132 

Monterrev (1500) 890 

Morelia "(101) 1000 

Oaxaca (105) 1132 

Puebla (100) 1035 

Reynosa (10000) 961 

Saltillo (10) 1091 

Tampico (501) 841 

Tampico (500) 890 

Toluca (50) 1133 

Veracruz (....) 680 

Veracruz (50) 800 

Yillahermosa (350) 632 



550 EC, 545.1 Meters 
KFDY — Brookings. S. D. 
KFUO — Clayton. Mo. 
KFYB — Bismarck, N. D. 
KOAC — Corvallis, Ore. 
KSD — St. Louis. Mo. 
WGR — Buffalo. N. Y. 
WKRC — Cincinnati, 0. 

560 KC., 535.4 Meters 

KFDM — Beaumont. Tex. 
KLZ — Denver, Col. 
KTAII— Oakland. Calif. 
WNOX — Knoxville. Tenn. 
WF1 -Philadelphia. Pa. 
WIRO — Chicago. 111. 
WLIT— Philadelphia. Pa. 
WI'CC— Chicago. 111. 
WQAM — Miami Beach, Fla. 



680 KC, 440.9 Meters 
KFEQ — St. Joseph, Mo. 
KPO — San Francisco. Calif. 
WPTF — Raleigh. N. C. 

690 KC, 434.5 Meters 
NAA — Arlington. Va. 

700 KC, 428.3 Meters 
WLW — Cincinnati. O. 

710 KC, 422.3 Meters 
WOR — Newark. N. .T. 
KMPC — Beverly Hills, Calif. 

720 KC, 416.4 Meters 
WOK— Chicago, 111. 



570 KC, 526.0 Meters 740 KC, 405.2 Meters 



KGKO — 'Wichita Falls. Tex. 
KMTR — Hollywood, Calif. 
KXA— Seattle. Wash. 
WEAO— Columbus. O. 
WKBN — Youngslown. O. 
WMAC — Syracuse. .\". Y. 
WHOA — New York, N. Y. 
WNAX — Yankton. S. D. 
WNYC — New York. X. Y. 
WWNC— Asheville. X C. 
WSYR— Syracuse, N. Y. 

580 KC, 516.9 Meters 

KGFX -Pierre. S. D. 
l\S.\r — Manhattan, Kan. 
WIHW— Topeka. Kan. 
WOBU— Charleston, W. Ya 
WSAZ — Huntington. W Va. 
WTAG — Worcester, Mass. 

590 KC, 508.2 Meters 
KIIQ Spokane. Wash. 
WCAJ- Lincoln, Neb. 
WKKI -Boston. Mass. 
WKZO — Berrien Sp'gs, Mich. 
WOW - Omaha. Neb. 

600 KC, 499.7 Meters 
WCAO— Baltimore. Md. 
KF8D — San Diego. Calif. 
WO AN — Lawreneeburg, Tonn. 
IVREC — Memphis, Tenn. 
WGBS— New York City. 
WMT — Waterloo. la. 
WCAC — Stnrrs, Conn. 

610 KC, 491.5 Meters 

KFRC N';m Francisco. Calif. 
WDAF -Kansas Citv. Mo. 

WFAN .Philadelphia, l'a. 
VVIP — Philadelphia, Pa. 

WJAY— Cleveland. 0. 

620 KC, 483.6 MeterB 

K0W Portland, Ore. 
WFLA — Clearwater. Fla. 
WSl'N— St. Petersburg. Fla 
WTMJ— Milwaukee, Wis. 
KTAR— Phconix. Ariz. 
W7,BZ— Bangor. Mo. 

630 KC, 475.9 Meters 

KFRU— Columbia. Mo. 
WGBF- Evansvllle, Ind. 

WOK- .inters. in Citv. Mo 
WMAL— Washington. D. C. 



K.MMJ— Clay Center, Neb. 
WSB — Atlanta, Ga. 

750 KC, 399.8 Meters 
WJR — Detroit, Mich. 

760 KC, 394.5 Meters 
KVI— Taroma. Wash. 

wew— 8t. Louis, Mo. 
w.iy, Boundbr t, X. J. 

770 KC, 389.4 Meters 
KFAB— Lincoln, Neb. 
WBBM Chicago, III. 
' WJBT— Chicago, 111, 

780 KC, 384.4 Meters 
KJELW— Burbank, Calif. 
WMC Memphis, Tenn. 
WTAR -Norfolk, Ya. 
KTM Santa Monica, Calif. 
WEAN Providence. R. I. 
wist Madison, Wis. 

790 KC, 379.5 Meters 

KGO - Oakland, Calif. 
W(JY — Schenectady, N. Y. 

800 KC, 374.8 Meters 
wiiap Ft. Worth, Tex. 
wiaa Dallas, Tex. 

810 KC, 370.2 Meters 

WCCO -Minneapolis, .Minn. 
WPCH -New York City 

820 KC, 365.5 Meters 
WHAS Louisville. Ky. 

830 KC, 361.2 Meters 
KOA lienver. Col. 
HUH' Gainesville, Fla 
w Him Glouce iter, Ma 

850 KC, 352.7 Meters 

KWKH shreveport. La. 
W Vl I, New Orli-.ins. La 

860 KC, 348.6 Meters 

KMO Tacoma, Wash. 
WABC New York citv. 
W III! Kansas City, .Mo. 



640 KC, 468.5 Meters 870 KC, 344.6 Meters 



KFI Los Angeles. Calif 
waif Columbus. O. 
WOI- Ames, la. 

650 KC, 461.3 Meters 

WSM Nashville. Tenn. 

660 KC, 454.3 Meters 
WEAF— New York City. 
W A AW- -Omaha. Neb. 

670 KC, 447.5 Meters 
WMAQ— Chicago. Ill 



WKNR Chicago. III. 

wi.s Chicago, ill. 

880 KC, 340.7 Meters 
KFKA— Greeley, Col 
M..\ Oakland, Calif 
KPOF- Denver. Col. 
WCOC — Meridian, Ml 
wgbi- Scranton, Pa, 
WQAN -Scranton, Pa. 
WSUI Iowa City, la 

890 KC. 336.9 Meters 
KFNF -Shenandoah, la 



Stations Classified by Wave-lengths 

Only U. S. A. Stations of 100 Watts or More Are Included in This 
Tabulation. Classification by Cities and States Next Issue. 



KUSD — Vermillion. S. 
WGST — Atlanta, Ga. 
WMAZ — Macon. Ga. 
WMMN — Fairmont. W. 
WILL — Urbana. 111. 
WKAQ — San Juan. P. 
W.1AR — Providence. R. 



KG.IF— Little Rock. Ark. 



KTHS — Hot Springs, Ark. 
WKAR — E. Lansing. Mich. 
WMAK — Buffalo, N. Y. 

1050 KC, 285.5 Meters 

KXX — Hollywood. Calif. 
KFKB — Milford. Kan. 



900 KC, 333.1 Meters 106O KC, 282.8 Meters 



KHJ — Los Angeles, Calif. 
WBEN — ButTalo, N. Y. 
WJAX — Jacksonville, Fla. 
WKY — Oklahoma City. Okta. 
WLBL — Stevenspoint, Wis. 
KGBU — Ketchikan, Alaska. 
KSEI — Pocatello. Ida. 

920 KC, 325.9 Meters 

KFXF — Denver. Col. 
KOMO— Seattle, Wash. 
WAAF— Chicago, III. 
WWJ — Detroit, Mich. 
WBSO— Needham, Mass. 
KFRC — Houston, Tex. 
KFEL — Denver, Col. 

930 KC, 322.4 Meters 

KFWI— San Francisco, Calif. 
KGBZ York. Neb. 
KMA— Shenandoah, la. 
K ROW— Oakland. Calif. 
WHRC Birmingham, Ala. 
WDB.I- Roanoke. Va. 
WHIG — Elklns Park. Pa. 

940 KC, 319.0 Meters 
KOIN- Purl lan. I. Ore. 
WCSH Portland. Me. 

WDAY Fargo. X. I). 

WFIW Hopkinsvillo, Ky. 
wha Madison, Wis. 
KGU- Honolulu, Hawaii. 

WAAT- Jersey City, N. J. 

950 KC, 315.6 Meters 
mwr Hollywood, Calif, 
KGHL Billings, Monl 
K.Mltc Independence, Mo 

WBC Washington, I). C, 

970 KC, 309.1 Meters 

K.IU Seattle. Wash. 

WCFti 'Chicago, 111, 

980 KC, 305.9 Meters 
KHKA E Pittsburgh, Pa. 

090 KC, 302.8 Meters 
WBZ Springfield, Us ■ 



KW.I.I — Portland, Ore. 
WBAL — Baltimore. Md. 
W.TAG — Norfolk, Neb. 
WTIC — Hartford, Conn. 

1070 KC, 280.2 Meters 

WTAM — Cleveland. O. 
WDZ — Tuscola, 111. 

1080 KC, 277.6 Meters 

WBT — Charlotte. N. C. 
WCBD — Ziun. III. 
WMHI— Addison. 111. 

1090 KC, 275.1 Meters 
KMOX- St. Louis, M0i 

1100 KC, 272.6 Meters 
vVLWL-Ni'w York City. 
WPG — Atlantic City, N. J. 
KGDM — Stockton. Calif. 

1110 KC, 270.1 Meters 

KSOO— Sioux Falls, S. D. 
WRVA Richmond, Va. 



KFWF — St. Louis. Mo. 
KGCU — Mandan. N. D. 
KGDE — Fergus Falls. Minn. 
KGDY— Oldham. S. D. 
KGEK — Yuma. Col. 
KGEW — Fort Morgan. Col. 
KGF.I — Los Angeles. Calif. 
KGHI — Little Rock. Ark. 
KGY — Laccy, Wash. 
KSMR — Santa Maria, Calif. 
KVOS — Bellingham. Wash. 
KWG — Stockton. Calif. 
WABI — Bangor. Me. 
WABZ — New Orleans. La. 
WBBZ — Ponca City, Okla. 
WCAT — Rapid City. S. D. 
WCAX — Burlington. Yt. 
WCLO — Kenosha. Wis. 
WCOD — Harrisburg, Pa. 
WEIIC — Emory, Va. 
WEPS — Worcester. Mass. 
WFBC — Knoxville, Tenn. 
WFBE — Cincinnati. O. 
WHBC — Canton. O. 
WIIBY — Green Bay. Wis, 
WIBX — Utica, N. Y. 
WIL — St. Louis, Mo. 
W.IHC— La Salic. III. 
W.IUL — Decatur. III. 
W.IHW — New Orleans. La. 
ster, Pa. 



-Li 



Ky. 

Va. 



WLAI 

WLBG — Petersburg, 
WNBO — Washing! 01 
WNBW- -Carbondali 
VVNBX— Springfield 
wohc — Worcester, M 
WRAP— La Porte. Ind 
WRBI. — Columbus, Ga. 
WWAE — Hammond, Hid. 



Pa. 

Vt. 
s. 



1230 KC, 243.8 Meters 
IvlTA — San Francisco, Calif. 
WBIS — Boston. Mass. 
WFBM — Indianapolis. Ind. 
WNAC — S'. Boston. Mass. 
WPSC — State College. Pa. 
WSBT — South Bend, Ind. 
KGGM — Albuquerque, N. M. 

1240 KC, 241.8 Meters 
KTAT — Ft. Worth. Tex. 
WXYZ — Detroit. Mich. 
WACO — Waco, Tex. 

1250 KC, 239.9 Meters 

KFMX — Northfleld. Minn. 
WCAL — Northfleld, Minn. 
WDSU — New Orleans. La. 
WGCP— -Newark. N. J. 
WLB — Minneapolis. Minn. 
WODA — Paterson, N. J. 
WRHM — Minneapolis, Minn. 
KFOX — Long Beach, Calif. 
KIDO — Boise. Ida. 
WAAM — Newark, N. J. 

1260 KC, 238.0 Meters 

KOIL — Council Bluffs. la. 
KROV — Harlingcn. Tex. 
KWWG— Brownsville, Tex. 
WLltW — Oil City, Pa. 
KVOA — Tucson, Ariz. 
WTOC — Savannah, (la. 

1270 KC, 236.1 Meters 

KFT T M--Col. Springs, Col. 
KGCA — Docorah. la. 
KW-LC Decorah. la. 
KTW— Seattle, Wash. 
WEAI— Ithaca. N. Y. 
WOOD- -Grand Rapids. Mich. 
KOI, Seattle. Wash. 
WASH— Grand Rapids. Mich. 
W.IDX — lackson. Miss. 
WFBR— Baltimore. Md. 



1120 KC, 267.7 Meters 1210 KC -> 247.8 Meters 128Q Kc 234 2 Meter3 



KFSG Lis Angeles. Calif. 
KMIC — Inglewoud, Calif. 
WDBO Orlando. Fla. 
WDEI. Wilmington. Del. 

wtaw College Station, Tex. 

wisx Milwaukee, wis 

WIIAD Milwaukee. Wis 

KTKII Houston, Tex. 

1130 KC, 265.3 Meters 
Ksl, Salt Lake City, Utah 
W.I.ID. Mooseheart, III. 
WOV Xcu York City. 

1140 KC, 263.0 Meters 

KVOO Tulsa. Okla. 
WAP1 Birmingham, Ala. 

1150 KC, 267.7 Meters 
wham Rochester, x. y. 



1000 KC, 299.8 Meters 1160 KC, 258.5 Meters 

who He, Moines, Is 

Woe Davenport, la. 

Kl \ 11 Culver City, Calif. 



wowo 11 Wayne, Ind. 
wwva Charleston, W. Va. 



1010 KC, 269.9 Meters 

m;i;f So Coffcyvllle. Okla 
Mjw San ■!" 0, 1 allf. 
WN AD — Norman, Okla 
WPAP— Cllffslde, N 1 

WIS Columbia. S. C. 

WRNY New York City. 

WQAO -New York ClH 
WHN— Not York City, 



1170 KC, 256.3 Meters 



Wl \i 

IvTNT 



Philadelphia, Pa. 
M11 ical Lnc, la. 



1180 KC, 254.1 Meters 
KEX Portland, ore 

KOIl Stale ( Ollegc, N. M 

w mil Mimics >, vi. nn 

WIIDI Mi apolis, M 

1020 KC, 293.9 Meters 1190 KC, 252.0 Meters 
WICC Bridgeport, Conn 

WOAI San Antonio. Tev 

1200 KC, 249.9 Meters 
KBTM Paragould, Ark. 

Kl.llt Mar liallluvvn. la 



KDFN 

KDLR 

KFOB 

KFVS 

KFXM 

kill It 

KGMP 

KGNO 

KM.I 

KPPC 

IvWEA 

WALR 

WHAX 

WCBS 

WCOD 

WCKW 

WDWI- 

WEBQ 

w EDC 

WGHH 

WGCM 

Wlllll 

w nut 
w.i m 

W.llll' 
WJBM 

W.IW 
W I, CI 
WI.M 
WMBG 
W M U.I 
VMM I, 
WIIMT 
WPAW 
W Itl'.i) 
WSBC 
u SEN 
WSOC 
WSIX 
w T \ X 



N. D. 



Casper. Wyo. 
Devil's Lake 
Lincoln. Neb 
— Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
S. Bernardino. Calif. 
— Watertown, S. I). 

- Elk City, Okla. 

- Dodge City, Kan. 
Fresno, Calif. 
-Pasadena. Calif 

- Shreveport, La. 
Zanesvllle, O. 

— Wilkes Barre, Pa. 
Springfield, III. 

5 tars, v Y, 

Chicago, III. 

Providence, R. 1. 
Ilarrisliurg. III. 
1 hlcago. in 
Freeport, N. Y. 

Gulfporl, Miss 

ROCk Island, in 

Aiid'TMiti, Ind 

Red Hank, X .1. 

Lcwlsburg, l'a 
Qad den, Ala, 
Man Held, 
Ithaca, N. v. 
Providence, R. 1- 

Riilni I, Va. 

Jamaica, v Y. 
.lam- town, v v 

Manitowoc, Wis 

Pawtucket, it 1 
Greenville, Ml 
Chicago. III. 

1 ius, 0. 

Gastonia, x. c. 
Springfield, Tenn 

lr. stor, III 



WCAM— Caniden. N. J. 
WCAP — AshbUry Park. N. J. 
WDOD Chattanooga, Tenn. 
WO AX- Trenton. N. J. 
WRR— Dallas. Tex. 
KFIIH Great. Falls. Monl. 
W1BA- Madison, Wis. 

1290 KC, 232.4 Motors 
KDYL Sail Lake City, Utah. 

mi I. Galveston, Tex, 

K'I'SA San Anh.nl. .. T.v 

WEBC Superior, Wis, 
w.ias Pittsburgh, Pa. 

1300 KC, 230.6 Meters 

KCF.F Los Angeles. Calif 
Kill Wlohlta, Kan, 
MM It Port land. Ore 

wititit Rossville. N. Y. 

KTB1 Los Angeles, Calif 

KTHR Port land. Ore. 
WEVD Foresl mils. N. Y. 

WIIAP ,\,-vv York City. 
WIIAZ Troy. N. Y. 

wioii Miami Beach, Flo 

WOO. Kansas City, Mo. 
1310 KC, 228.9 Meters 



M'KX Cliirago, ill 

KYW— -Chicago, III 
WRAX -Philadelphia. Pa 

1040 KC, 288.3 Meters 

KRLD- -Dallas. Tev 



1220 KC, 245.8 Meters 

M M Lawrenco, Kau. 

KWSC Pullman. Wash. 
WCAO < .mi. .n, X. Y. 
w t ai; - Pittsburgh, Po 
w DAE Tampa, Fla. 
WREN Lawrenco, Kan 



MK.I 

KFBK 

KFGQ 

Mil 

KF.IY 

M PI, 

KFI'M 

KFUP 

KFXJ 

KFXR 

KGBX 

KGCX 

KGEZ 

KGFW 

KIT Y 

KMED, 

ICRMD 



Jerome, ArlB, 
Sacramento, Calif 
Boone, la 
Juneau, Alaska. 
Ft. Dodgo, la, 
Dublin, Tex. 

Greonylllo, Tex, 

Denver, Col. 

Edgewater, Col. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. 

si. Joseph, Mo. 
Wolf Point. Mont 
Kallspoll, Mont. 

Ravenna, Neb. 
akinia. Wash. 

Medford, Ore 

Shreveport. La 



KTLC- 
KTS'L- 
KTSM- 
KWCR 
KXRO- 
WBOW 
WBRE 
W'CI.S 
WDAH 
WEBR 
WFBG 
WFDF 
WGAL 

won 

WHAT 

WIBC 

W'.IAC 

W.IAK 

WKAV 

WKBB 

WKBC 

WKBS 

WLIIt 

WMHO 

WXH1I 

WORT 

WOI/— 

WRAW 

WRlil 

WHOl. 

WSA.I 

WS.IS 



Va. 
Pa. 



Houston, Tex. 
Shreveport, La. 
-El Paso. Tex. 
-Cedar Rapids. la. 
-Aberdeen. Wash. 
-Terre Haute. Ind. 

-Wakes-Bane, Pa. 

— .loliet. 111. 
[ — El Paso. Tex. 
-Buffalo. N. Y. 
-Altoona. Pa. 
-Flint. Mich. 
-Lancaster, Pa. 
"viewport .News. 
-Philadelphia. 
Poynetle. Wis. 
Johnstown. Pa. 
-Marion. Ind. 
' — Laconia, N. H. 
-Juliet, 111. 
Birmingham. Ala. 
Caleshurg. 111. 
— Muncie. Ind. 
1 — Atrburn, N. Y. 
— New Bedford. Mass. 
— Union City, Tenn. 
Washington, D. C. 
—Reading. Pa. 
-Tifton. Ga. 
-Knoxville. Tenn. 
-drove City. Pa. 
-Winston-Salem, N. C. 



1320 KC, 227.1 Meters 
WADC— Akron. O. 
WSMB -New Orleans. La. 
KID- Idaho Falls. Ida. 
KGMB Honolulu. Hawaii. 
KGIQ Twin Falls. Ida. 
KGHF — Pueblo. Col. 



1330 KC, 225.4 Motors 
KGB— San Diego. Calif. 
KSCJ Slonv City, la. 
WDRC N'.'vv Haven. Conn. 
WSAI -Cincinnati, O. 

WTAQ Eau Clair.-. Wis. 

1340 KC, 223.7 Meters 
kkpy Spokane, Wash, 

W'COA Pensacnl.1. Fla. 
WSPD Toledo, O. 

1350 KC, 221.1 Motors 
kwk st Louis, Mo 

WAWV. New York City. .. 

WCDA - New York Citv. 

WKltt) New York city 

w mm; No\t York City 

1360 KC, 220.4 Motors 

ICOER Long Reach. Calif. 
KCIIt Hull.-. Mont. 

KPSN Pasadona, Calif 

w CSC 1 hurloston, B. c. 

wkhi, Syracuse, N. Y. 

WGES Chicago, III. 

w.iks Gary, Ind. 

Willie \ Iclt burn, Mi 

1370 KC, 218.8 Meters 



Ki III' 

Kl HI. 

Kl .11 

KI'.IM 

MM/. 

M'LX 

IvIiAlt 

Kill I 

KODA 

KGFG 

k'Gl I. 

m;ki. 

KM \c 

KONO 

KIIOS 

IvIlK 

K\ I, 

KWKC 

WBTM 

WCBM 

WELK 

WFDV 

WCL 

Wlllll) 

WHIP) 



Enid, okla 

Bverott, Wash 
Astoria, Ore. 

(Iran. I Forks, N. D. 

Ft. Worth, Tex. 
Galveston, Tev. 
Tuoson, Arl7.. 
San Antonio, Tex. 
Mitchell, S. D. 
Oklahoma City, Okla. 
Raton, x M, 

San Angelo. Tev 
San Antonio, Tex. 
San Antonio, Tox. 
Marshfleld, Ore 
Berkeley, <'. n iif. 
Seattle, Wash. 

Kansas Citv. Mo. 
Danville, Va. 

Baltimore, Md. 

Philadelphia, Pa. 
— Rome. Ga. 
Fori Wayne, Ind 

Mounl Orab. O. 

Memphis, Tenn, 



Page 34 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



March, 1931 



WAVE-LENGTH GUIDE 



NATIONAL 

BROADCASTING 

STATION 



KSD 



WFI-WIBO-WLIT 



WTAG 



WEEI-WOW-KHQ 



KFSD 



WDAF 



WFLA-WSUN-WTMJ 
KGW-KTAR 



KFI 



WSM 



WEAF 



KPO-WPTF 



CKGW 



WLW 



WGN 



COLUMBIA 

BROADCASTING 

STATION 



WGR-WKRC 



KLZ-WQAM 



WKBN WNAX-WWNC 



WIBW 



WCAO-WMT-WREC 



WFAN-KFRC 



WLBZ 



WMAL 



WAIU 



WMAQ 



CKAC 



KYC 



550 



560 



570 



580 



590 



600 



610 



620 **■ 



630 



640 



650 



660 



&70 
680 



690 



700 



720 



730 



WSB 



WJR 



WJZ 



KFAB 



WMC 



WGY-KGO 



WFAA-WBAP 



WHAS 



KOA 



WENR-WLS 



WJAR 



WBEN-WJAX-WKY 



KPRC-KOMO-WWJ 



WCSH 



WRC 



WCFL 



KDKA 



WBZ 



WHO-WOC 



KYW 



CFCF 



KTHS 



740 



750 



KVI 



760 



WBBM 



WEAN-WTAR 



WCCO 



WABC 



WGST 



KHJ 



WBRC-WDBJ 



WDAY-KOIN 



KMBC 



CFRB 



770 



780 



790 



800 



810 



820 



830 






860 



870 



890 



900 



920 



930 



940 



950 



960 



970 



980 



990 



1000 



1020 



1030 



KRLD 



1040 



WBAL-WTIC 



WTAM 



WRVA 



KSL 



KVOO-WAPI 



WHAM 



WO A I 



WCAE-WREN 



WJDX 



WEBC 



WIOD 



WSMB 



WSAI 



KWK 



KECA 



WGAR 



KSTP 



WCKY 



1060 



1070 



WBT 



KMOX 



|1080 

1090 



WPG 



1100 



1110 



KTRH-WDBO-WISN 1120 



WJJD 



1130 



1140 



1150 



wowo 



1160 



WCAU 



1170 



1190 



WORC 



WDAE 



[ 120 
1220 



WFBM-WNAC 



1230 



WXYZ 



WDSU 



1 1240 

1250 



KOL 



WDOD-WRR 



KDYL-KTSA-WJAS 



KFH 



WADC 



KSCJ-WTAQ 



WSPD-KFPY 



KOI L-WLBW-WT OC 1 1 260 
|1270 

1 1280 
1 1290 
1 1300 
1 1320 
1 1330 
1 1340 
1 1350 
1 1360 
1 1390 
j 1410 
1 1430 
1 1440 
j 1450 
1 1460 
1470 



WFBL^ 

KLRA-WHK 

WBCM 



WCAH-WHP 



WHEC 



WLAC 
KFJF-WKBW 



[1480 
1490 



<■ 



IN MARCH 
(Or Dial Readings) 



WHDF — Calumet, Mich. 
W7BM — Jackson, Mich, 
WJBK — Ypsilanti, Mich. 
WLEY — Lexington, Mass. 
STATIONS HEARD WLV A— Lynchburg. Vs. 
WMBR — Tampa, Fla. 
WPOE — Patchogue. N. Y. 
WQDM— St. Albans, Vt. 
WRAK — Williamsport, Pa. 
WRBJ — Hattlcsburg, Miss. 
WRBT — Wilmington. N. C. 
\VRDO — Augusta, Me. 
WRJN — Racine, Wis. 
WSVS — Buffalo, N. Y. 

1380 KC, 217.3 Meters 
KOH — Reno, Nev. 
KQV — Pittsburgh, Pa. 
KSO — Clarinda, la. 
WKBH — La Crosse, Wis. 
WSMK — Dayton. O. 



1390 KC, 215.7 Meters 
KLRA — Little Rock. Ark. 
KUOA — Fayetteville, Ark. 
WHK — Cleveland. O. 
KOY — Phoenix. Ariz. 

1400 KC, 214.2 Meters 

KLO— Ogden, Utah. 
KOCW — Chickasha, Okla. 
WCMA — Culver, Ind. 
WCGU — Coney Island, N. Y. 
WBAA — West Lafayette, Ind. 
WBBC — Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WKBF — Indianapolis, Ind. 
WFOX — Brooklyn, N. Y. 
WLTH — Brooklyn, N. Y. 



1410 KC, 212.6 Meters 
KGRS — Amarillo, Tex. 



KFLV — Rockford. 111. 
WDAG — Amarillo, Tex. 
WHBL — Sneboygan, Wis. 
WBCM — Hampton Township. 

Mich. 
WHIS — Bluefleld, W. Va. 
WLEX — Lexington, Mass. 
WODX — Springhill, Ala. 
WSFA — Montgomery. Ala. 
WSSH — Boston. Mass. 
WRBX — Roanoke. Va. 



1420 KC, 211.1 Meters 

KBPS — Portland, Ore. 
KFIZ — Fond du Lac, Wis. 
KFQU — Holy City, Calif. 
KFQW — Seattle. Wash. 
KFXD — Jerome, Ida. 
KFXY — Flagstaff, Ariz. 
KFYO — Abilene, Tex. 
KGFF — Alva, Okla. 
KGGC — San Francisco, Calif. 
KGIW — Trinidad. Col. 
KGIX — Las Vegas, Nev. 
KGKX — Sand Point. Ida. 
KGVO — Missoula, Mont. 
KICK— Red Oak. la. 
KLPM — Minot, N. D. 
KORE — Eugene, Ore. 
KTAP — San Antonio, Tex. 
KXL — Portland. Ore. 
KXYZ — Houston. Tex. 
WEDH — Erie, Pa. 
WEHS — Evanston. 111. 
WELL — Battle Creek, Mich. 
WFDW — Talladega, Ala. 
WHDL — Tupper Lake, N. Y. 
WHFC — Cicero, 111. 
WIAS — Ottumwa, la. 
WIBR — Steubenville. O. 
WILM — Wilmington. Del. 
WJBO — New Orleans. La. 
WKBI— Chicago. 111. 
WLBF — Kansas City. Kan. 
WMBC — Detroit, Mich. 



WMBH— Joplin. Mo. 
WPAD — Paducah, Ky. 
WSPA — Spartanburg. S. C. 
WTBO — Cumberland. Md. 

1430 KC, 209.7 Meters 

KECA — Los Angeles, Calif. 
KGNF — No. Platte, Neb. 
WCAH — Columbus. O. 
WBAK — Harrisburg, Pa. 
WGBC — Memphis, Tenn. 
WHP — Harrisburg, Pa. 
WNBR — Memphis. Tenn. 



1440 KC, 208.2 Meters 

KLS — Oakland. Calif. 
WBIG — Greensboro, N. C. 
WCBA — Allentown, Pa. 
WHEC — Rochester, N. Y. 
WMBD — Peoria Heights, 111. 
WOKO — Albany, N. Y. 
WTAD — Quincy, 111. 
WSAN — Allentown, Pa. 

1450 KC, 206.8 Meters 
KTBS — Shreveport. La. 
WBMS— Ft. Lee. N. J. 
WGAR — Cleveland, O. 
WHOM — Jersey City, N. J. 
WKBO — Jersey City, N. J. 
WNJ — Newark. N. J. 
WSAR — Fall River. Mass. 
WTFI — Toccoa. Ga. 

1460 KC, 205.4 Meters 

KSTP— St. Paul, Minn. 
WJSV — Alexandria. Va. 



1470 KC, 204.0 Meters 
WLAC — Nashville, Tenn. 



WTNT — Nashville. Tenn. 
KGA — Spokane. Wash. 

1480 KC, 202.6 Meters 
KFJF — Oklahoma City. Okla. 
WKBW — Amherst, N. Y. 

1490 KC, 201.6 Meters 
KPWF — Westminster, Calif. 
WCHI — Chacago, 111. 
WCKY — Covington. Ky. 
WJAZ — Chicago. 111. 

1500 KC, 199.9 Meters 

KDB — Santa Barbara. Calif. 
KGFI — Corpus Christi, Tex. 
KGFK — Moorhead, Minn. 
KGIZ — Grant City, Mo. 
KGKB — Brownwood, Tex. 
KGKY — Scottsbluff. Neb. 
KPJM — Prescott. Ariz. 
KPQ — Wenatchee. Wash. 
KREG — Santa Ana. Calif. 
KUJ — Longview. Wash. 
KUT — Austin, Tex. 
KXO — El Centro. Calif. 
WCLB — Long Beach. N. Y. 
WDIX— Tupelo. Miss. 
WKBV — Connersville, Ind. 
WKBZ — Ludington, Mich. 
WLBX — Long Island City. 

N. Y. 
WLOE — Boston. Mass. 
WMBA — Newport. R. I. 
WMBJ — Wilkinsburg. Pa. 
WMBQ— Brooklyn. N. Y. 
WMPC — Lapeer. Mich. 
WNBF — Binghamton. N. Y. 
WOPI — Bristol, Tenn. 
WPEN — Philadelphia. Pa. 
WRDW — Augusta. Ga. 
WSYB — Rutland, Vt. 
WWRL — Woodside. N. Y. 



{0^&*gjhg£ 



Atwater-Kent, NBC. Sun. 9:15. 
Around the Samovar, CBS, Sat. 9. 

A. & P. Gypsies, NBC, Mon. 8:30. 
Armour Program, NBC, Frl. 9:30. 
Armstrong Quakers, NBC, Fri. 10. 

An Evening in Paris, CBS. Mon. 9:30. 
Arco Birthday Party, NBC. Thur. 9. 
Arabesque, CBS, Sun. 9. 
Amos 'n' Andy, NBC, daily, 7 and 11. 
American Maize Program, CBS, Mod. 

10:30. 
Adventures of Polly Preston, NBC. Tues. 

7:45. 
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, NBC, Mon. 

10 and 12. 
Anheuser-Busch, CBS. Mon. 7:45. 
Aunt Lulu's Adventures, NBC. Sat. 10:30. 
Ann Leaf, CBS', Mon. and Sat. 4; daily, 

12:30. 
Adventures in Words, CBS, Tues. 5. 
American Mutual Program, CBS, Tues. and 

Fri. 7:15. 

Back Home Hour. CBS, Sun. 11. 
Blackstone Plantation, NBC, Tues. 8, 

Thur. 9. 
Back of the News in Washington, NBC, 
Wed. 7:45. 

B. A. Rolfe and Lucky Strike Orchestra, 

NBC. Tues., Thur., Sat. 10. 
Black and Gold Room Orchestra, NBC, 

daily 6:05. 
Brownbilt Footlights, NBC. Fri. 7:45. 
Be Square Motor Club. CBS, Sun. 10:30. 
Billiken Pickards, NBC, Tues. and Sat. 

7:45. 
Bill Schudt's Going to Press, CBS, Wed. 6. 
Barbasol. CBS. Mon. and Thur. 8:15. 
Brazilian-American, NBC. Thur. 5. 
Blue Ribbon Malt Jester, CBS, Tues. 10. 
Book Reporter, NBC, Wed. 5. 
Boscul Moments, NBC, Wed. 7:30 and 

Fri. 7:15. 
Benjamin Moore Triangle, NBC, Fri. 

5:30. 

Catholic Hour, NBC. Sun. 6. 

Camel Pleasure Hour, NBC. Wed. 9:30 

and 11:15. 
Cities Service Orchestra, NBC. Fri. 8. 
Cliquot Club Eskimos. NBC, Frl. 9. 
Collier's Hour, NBC, Sun. 8:15. 
Crime Prevention Program, NBC. Frl. 10. 
Chase and Sanborn Choral Orchestra, NBC, 

Sun. 8. 
Chesebrough Real Folks, NBC, Mon. 9:30. 
Coca Cola Top Notchcrs, NBC. Wed. 10:30. 
Canadian Pacific. NBC, Wed. 8:30. 
Cadman, Dr. S. Parlies. NBC. Sun. 4. 
Careless Love, NBC, Mon. 7:30. 
Current Events. CBS. Mon. 7. 
Cook's Travel Series, NBC, Sun. 6:30. 
Campus, NBC. Sat. 9. 
Columbians, CBS, Wed. 9:30. 
Columbia Concerts Corp., Wrd, 10:30. 
Classic Gems. NBC. Mon. 4:30, Sat. 4. 
Columbia Artist Recital. CBS. Tues. 4:30. 
Clara, Lu and Em. NBC, daily (except 

Mon). 10:30. 
ContI Program. NBC, Wed. 6:15. 
Columbia Laboratory, Wed. 10. 
Chiclets Program. CBS. Thur. 7:30. 
Curl is Inst Unto of Music, CBS, Fri. 4. 
Cuckoo. NBC. Sat. 10. 

Dixies Circus. NBC, Sat. 8. 

Detective Story Magazine, CBS, Thur. 

9:30. 
Death Valley Days, NBC, Tues. 9:30. 
Davey Tree, NBC. Sun. 5. 
Dr. Clark's French Lessons. CBS. R'at. 5. 
"Devils. Drugs and Doctors," CHS, Sun. 8. 
Daddy and Hollo, cbs, Tues., Wed., 

Thur. 7:4.1. 
Dutch Masters. CBS, Fri. 8:30. 

Empire Builders. NBC. Mnn. 10:30. 
Evangeline Adams, CBS, Mon., Wed. and 

Fri. 7:30. 
Early Bookworm, CBS. Sat. S:30. 
Knna Jclllck. NBC. Sun. S and Fri. 9:30. 
Evensong. NBC. Sun. 11. 
Echoes of the Opera. NBC, Thur. 10. 
Eno crime Club. ('lis. dally, 6:45. 
Eastman Symphony, NBC, Wed. 4. 
Edward Rambler, NBC. Wed. 7:15. 
Eastman Kodak Hour, NBC, Frl. 10. 

Fox Fur Trappers. CBS. Sun. 6. 

Pro-Joy Players, ens. Thur. 7. 

Floyd Gibbons, NBC, Sun. 0:30. 

Florshclm Frolic. NBC, Tues. 8:30. 

Fuller Man. NBC. Sat. 8:30. 

Friendly Flvo Footnotes, NBC, Thur. 

7:45. 
Fifteen Minutes in Nation's Capital. NBC. 

Mon S I,",. 
I ir i Mghler. NBC, Thur. 8. 



General Electric Hour, NBC, Sat. 9. 
Golden Hour of the Little Flower, CBS, 

Sun. 7. 
Gloria Gay's Affairs, NBC, Wed. 6:30. 
Guy Lombardo and Orchestra, CBS, Wed. 

11 and Sat. 11:30. 
Gauchos, CBS, Sun. 10:30. 
Graham-Paige Hour, CBS, Sun. 9:30. 
General Motors. NBC, Mon. 9:30. 
Graybar's, "Mr. and Mrs.," CBS, Tues. 

10. 
Gobel Mystery Girl, NBC. Mon. and Wed. 

5:30. 
Gold Medal Fast Freight, CBS, Wed. 9. 

Harbor Lights, NBC, Sun. 7:30. 
Henry-George, CBS, Tues. 9. 
Happy Wonder Bakers, NBC, Tues. 9:30. 
Halsey Stuart Program, NBC, Wed. 9. 
Hamilton Watch. CBS. Thur. 8:45. 
Hank Simmons' Showboat, CBS, Sat. 10. 
Howard Dandies, CBS, Sun. 6:30. 
How's Business. NBC, Mon. 8. 
Highroad of Adventure. NBC, Sat. 7:45. 
Household Finance, NBC, Tues. 9. 
Home Decoration, NBC, Thur. 4. 

Interwoven Pair, NBC, Fri. 9. 
Iodent Big Brother Club, NBC. Sun. 7. 
International Broadcast. CBS, Sun. 12:30. 
Irene Beasley, CBS, Thur. 9, Sun. 8:45. 

Jack Frost's Melody Moments, NBC, Thur. 

9:30. 
Jolly Junketeer, NBC. Wed. and Sat. 5. 
Junior Detectives, NBC, Sat. 5:30. 
Junior Literary Guild, CBS, Sat. 5:30. 

Kaffee Hag Program, NBC. Sun. 10:30. 
Kaltenborn News, CBS, Sun., Tues. and 
Thur. 8:30. 

Literary Digest, NBC. daily, 6:45, and 

CBS, daily, 8. 
Le Trio Morgan. NBC. Fri. 8:30. 
Lutheran Layman's Program, CBS, Thur. 

10. 
Laws that Safeguard Society, NBC. Sat. 

7:15. 
Listerine — Bobby Jones. NBC. Wed. 8. 
Little Jack Little, NBC, Sat. 11:4 5. 
Lady Next Door, NBC, Tues. 5:30 (daily, 

5). 
Landt Trio and White, NBC, Tues. 10:30. 
Light Opera Gems, CBS. Fri. 5. 

Major Bowe's Family. NBC, Fri. 7. 
Mormon Tabernacle, NBC, Mon. 6:15. 
Maytag Orchestra. NBC, Mon. 9. 
Mnbiloll Concert. NBC. Wed. 8:30. 
Mid-week Hymn Sing. NBC, Thur. 7. 
Maxwell House Melodies, NBC, Thur. 

9:30. 
Margaret Olsen, NBC, Sun. 6. 
Muriel and Vee. NBC, Sun. 11. 
Moon Magic. NBC. Tues. 8:30. 
Musio Appreciation Hour. NBC, Fri. 11 

A. M. 
Musical Moment, NBC. Sun. 6:15. 
Musical Demi-tasse, NBC. Mon. 7. 
McKesson Musical Magazine, NBC. Tues. 9. 
Morton Downey, CBS. Mon. 11, Wed. and 

Fri.. Sat. 7. and Thur. 12. 
Maltine Story. NBC. Mon. 5. 
Melody Musketeers. CBS. Mon. 6:30. 
Musical Album. CBS. Wed. 4. 
Matinee Gems. NBC. Wed. 4:30. 
Magic of Speech. NBC, Thur. 4. 
Mary Charles, CBS, Thur. S. 



Phil. Spitalny Orchestra, NBC, Mon., 

Tues. and Sat. 12. 
Pacific Vagabonds. NBC, Tues. 4. 
Pond's. NBC, Tues. 5. 
Premier Malt Program, CBS, Tues. 11. 
Poems. NBC, Wed. 10:30. 
Pertussin Playboys, CBS, Fri. 8:15. 

Quaker Oats, NBC. daily. 7:30. except 

Sat. 
Quiet Harmonies, CBS, Sun. 12. 
Roxy Symphony Orchestra, NBC. Sun. 

11:30 A. M. 
Russian Cathedral Choir, NBC. Sun. 

11:30. 
Reminiscences, NBC, Sun. 9:30. 
Roxy and His Gang, NBC, Mon. 7:45. 
Robert Burns Panatela, CBS, Mon. 10. 
Rudy Vallee. NBC, Thur. 8. 
R-K-0 Hour, NBC, Fri. 10:30. 
Rise of the Goldbergs. NBC. Sat. 7:30. 
Raising Junior, NBC, daily (except Mon.), 

6. 
Radio Luminaries, NBC, Sun. 9. 
Royal Hours. CBS. Sun. 10. 
Radiotron Varieties, NBC, Wed. and Sat. 

8:15. 
Radio Guild. NBC. Fri. 4. 
RCA Victor. NBC. Sun. 7:30. 
Rodeheaver Sing, NBC. Wed. and Sat. 7. 
Romanelli and Orchestra, CBS. Fri. 11:30. 
Romance of American Industry, CBS. Sat. 

7:15. 
Radio Follies. CBS. Fri. 10. 
Radio Lislening Test. CBS. Mon. 4. 
Rinso Talkie. NBC. Tues. and Thur. 5:30. 
Radio Roundup. CBS, Thur. 10:30. 



Niagara Hudson. NBC. Thur. 7:30. 
Nit-Wit Hour. CBS. Fri. 10:30. 
Natural Bridge Program. NBC. Frl. 8:45. 
New York Philharmonic Orchestra, CBS. 

Sun. 3. 
Nestle Chncolateers. NBC. Fri. 8. 
National Youth Conference. NBC. Sun. 3. 
National Radio Forum. CBS. Sat. 0:30. 
Northern Lights, NBC. Sun. 6:30. 
National Vespers. NBC, Sun. 5. 
National Dairy Program, NBC. Sun. 10. 

Oirr Government, NBC, Sun. 0. 
Old Gold Character Readings. CBS. Tues. 
8:15 and Thur. 9. 

Paul Tremaino and Orchestra. CBS, Tues. 

11. Thur. 6. Sat. 6:30. 
Palmollve Hour, NBC. Wed. 9:30. 
Philro Symphony. CBS. Tues. 9:30. 
Paramount Publlx Hour, CBS. Tues. 

10 :30. 
Premier Salad Dressers, CBS. Tues. 8:45, 
Political Sltualion in Washington. CBS, 

Tues. 7:30. 
Pennzoll Pete, NBC, Sun. 10:15. 
Paul White-man. NBC. Tues. 8. 
Pacific Feature Program. NBC. Sal. I. 



Sunday at Seth Parker's, NBC, Sun. 10:45. 

Stromberg-Carlson. NBC. Mon. 10. 

Soconyland Sketches. NBC. Tues. 7:30. 

Slumber Music. NBC, daily 11. 

South Sea Islanders. NBC, Sun. 11:30. 

Science, NBC. Wed. 7:15. 

Savino Tone Pictures. CBS, Mon. 8:30. 

Susan Steell. NBC, Thur. 6. 

School of the Air. CBS. 2:30 School Days. 

Start and Stop, NBC. Mon. 6. 

Silver Mask Tenor. NBC. Tues. 7:15. 

Smith Bros., NBC. Wed. 7:45. 

Salada Tea Co.. NBC. Thur. 8:30. 

Snoop and Peep. NBC, Sat. 7:30. 

Song Shoppe. NBC. Sat. 4:30. 

Sisters of the Skillet. NBC, Sat. 4. 

Sun Kist Musical Cocktail, CBS, Wed. 

S:30. 
Sky Sketches, NBC. Wed. 4:30. 
Story in a Song. CBS. Mon. 10:30. 
Sweethearts of the Air. CBS, Sun. 5:30. 
Sermon by Dr. Barnhouse. CBS. Sun. 5. 
Savannah Liners Orchestra, NBC. Tues. 

6:30. 
Sundial Bonnie Laddies. NBC. Fri. 6:30. 
Spanish Serenade, CBS, Sat. 4:30. 

Tastyeast Jesters, NBC. Mon., Thur. and 

Sat. 7:15. 
True Story Hour.CBS. Fri. 9. 
Troubadour of the Moon, NBC, Sat. II. 
Three Mustachlos. NBC. Tues. 7:45. 
Three Bakers. CBS, Mon. 9. 
Toscha Seldel, CHS. Fri. 8. 
Two Troupers, NBC. Fri. 9:30. 
Tony's Scrapbook. CBS. dailv, 5:30. 
Tea Timers. NBC. Mon.. Wed.. Fri., Sat. 

5:30. 
Throe Doctors. CBS. Thur. 4. 
Tetley Program. NBC. Fri. 5. 
Ted Husing's Sport Slants, CBS. Sat. 6. 

Fncle Abe and David. NBC. Wed., Thur., 

Fri .ind Sat. 6:45. 
U. S. Sen ice Band. CBS. Wed. 8. Mon. 

4. NBC. Mon. 4. Thur. 4:30. 
U. S. School of Music, CBS. Sun. 8:15. 

Vincent Lopez. NBC. Tues. 11:30. Weil. 

and Fri. 11. 
Voters' Service Program, NBC. Tues. 7. 
Vapex Musical Doctors, NBC. Sat. 9:30. 
Virginia Arnold. CBS. Mon. 3:30. 
Vikings, NBC, Tues. 7:15. 

Williams Oilomalics, NBC, Sun. 4. 
Wonder Dog. NBC, Sat. S:15. 
World To-day. NBC. Mon. 7:15. 
World's Business. CBS, Fri. 7:45. 
Who's Behind the Name, NBC, Mon. and 

Tues. 6:30. 
World In Music. NBC. Fri. 6. 
Weber and Fields. NBC. Sat. 8. 
Wayside Inn. NBC. Wed. 9. 
Westinghouse Salute. NBC. Sim. 7. 
Walter Mills. NBC. Tues. 6:15. 
Works of Composers. NBC, Tues. 8:30. 
Wayne King. NBC, Wed. 12:30. 

"Your Eyes." NBC, Sun. 4 :30. 








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APRIL 
1931 



VOL.2 NO. 6 



UNCLE ABE AND DAVID 








Top row (left to right): HELEN GILLIGAN, 
musical-comedy favorite, is the guest star of 
"Paramount on Parade" every Friday noon 
over CBS. GINGER ROGERS, star of "Girl 
Crazy," and LORNA FANTIN, "Old Gold's" 
numerologist, were snapped while Miss Fantin 
was making an analysis of Miss Rogers for her 
Tuesday night broadcast over CBS. Second 
row (left to right): ANNABELLE JACK- 
SON, WTAM's concert pianist, is official 
hostess of that station when not "on the air." 
LEE MORSE has signed up with CBS and will 
be heard singing blues over that chain several 
times a week. NANCY CARROLL, film and 
talkie favorite, is a frequent guest artist over 
the chains. 



OUR COVER PICTURE 
"Uncle Abe and David," the true-to-life, 
"down East" sketch which is available to the 
listening audience every Wednesday, Thursday, 
Friday and Saturday evening, 6:45, E. S. T., 
over an NBC network, is depicted on the cover 
of this issue. 

'Member way back in June, when this pro- 
gram was first put on the air, and Arthur 
Allen, in the character of "David," and Phil- 
lips H. Lord "making" the whimsical "Uncle 
Abe," delighted us with their visit to New 
York City? Here they are, just arrived in the 
great metropolis and evidently trying to ward 
off that inevitable nostalgia with the good old 
game of checkers. 



WHAT'S ON THE AlR 

(Resistered in U. S. Patent Office) 



Vol. II. 



MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 



No. 6 



THE AIROa "SEES in U.TY^ CUTTER STS - Cincinnati, O., by WHAT'S ON 
Editorial and Circulation Offices: Box 6 Station N Cinci™*™ n 

P»,c? T ! S , , n NG 0FFI0KS: i 1 W. FOKTY-SKOONI, ST NEW YORK S ' 

PKICE, 150. PER COPY; .$1.50 PUR VF\K 

(OOPYBIGHT, 1931, by What's on THE Air Co ) 
IN MhS^^ P0B ° 0VER BASIC "««"« PROGRAM-FINDING SERVICE OFFERED 

Entered as seoond-oiaAss m\ttft? at>» m ioon .„ m 

RATI, 0., UNDER THE ACT OF MARCH 5, 1879." ' ' ™ P0ST -° FPIOE AT ClNOIN- 



AGENTS WANTED! 

Take orders for What's on the Am sub- 
scriptions in your community. Every radio 
home a good prospect. Your friends and 
neighbors will enjoy this new radio program 
directory and magazine. Full or part time 
work. Liberal offer to both men and women. 
Write for our proposition to agents. 
CrRcuLATioN Manager, 
What's on the Air, 
Ninth and Cutter Sts., Cincinnati, O. 



v^ui b x v y VO D 



WHAT'S ON THE AlR 



THE MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 



VOLUME IL 



/ 



APRIL, 1931 



No. 6 



Cwiiroliwp R^ifa's Traffic l^rres 

A (jlfmpse or Hie federal R&cIto CwwiTSsmn 

prepared for'WOTA" Readers by (j.FMLTN WISNER 

chief of Press Serufce, federal fc^ta ComroTsstan 




Hon.. I re*. \ 

f^)Dir\50A5 





Q/tsvrbuc 



RADIO developments in various fields have been 
so rapid and conditions have shifted so quick- 
ly that it has been most difficult to chart an exact 
course of supervision — fair and just to all parties 
concerned. 

Inventions, discoveries and practical uses of this 
wonderful art have been so sensational that the 
proper regulation and control have presented one of 
the most complex and perplexing problems ever 
submitted to mankind for solution. 

Radio not only is not circumscribed by State 
lines, but it defies national borders, so that it pre- 
sents a world problem of momentous proportions. 
Several international conferences on radio have al- 
ready been held, and a fine spirit of co-operation 
prevails among the nations on radio matters. No 
snags or snarls of moment have developed, and in- 
ternational good will prevails in the radio world. 
At all such conferences the United States has taken 
a most conspicuous part. 

Since 1896, when Marconi succeeded in a prac- 
tical application of the Hertzian waves by using 
radio for transmission for one and three-quarter 
miles, this art has steadily gone forward, opening up 
new fields, adding much to human advancement 
and happiness. 

As is well known, the first practical use of radio 
was in marine communication. In 1912 Congress 
enacted legislation putting this new godsend to 
shipping and commerce in the hands of the Secre- 
tary of Commerce. Shore-to-ship, ship-to-shorc and 
ship-to-ship services were established and main- 
tained, thus minimizing the hazards of the sea and 
facilitating trade. 

When radio broadcasting was developed in 1921, 
its supervision was given serious thought and study, 
and its regulation was placed in the hands of the 
Secretary of Commerce. He assumed that the 
Marine Act of 1912, as amended, was broad enough 
to authorize him to grant licenses, allocate wave- 
lengths, power and time of transmission to broad- 
casting stations. 

That authority was challenged in 1926 by a 
Chicago station, and the Federal courts in that case 
rendered a decision which was interpreted by the 




^ Q/diKmor 



Attorney General as virtually a breakdown of con- 
trol by the Federal Government of radio broadcast- 
ing. 

With no one in control of the radio-traffic lanes, 
anarchy prevailed in the air, and radio stations 
sprang up like mushrooms, more than two hundred 
being erected in a few months. Many broadcasters 
jumped their waves, increased their power and hours 
of operation, etc., without any concern for the 
rights of others or for the listeners. Bedlam reigned 
supreme. 

Congress promptly took hold of the situation, 
and, after much study and deliberation, enacted the 
Radio Act of 1927, which went into effect Feb. 23, 
1927, creating the Federal Radio Commission. 

That measure will go down in history as a very 
constructive piece of legislation enacted for the 
benefit of our people. With no precedents to guide 
it, Congress incorporated in that act fundamental 
principles so sound and far-reaching that all future 
enactments must necessarily revolve around them. 
Imperfections of minor importance, of course, have 
become apparent, but these can be remedied with- 
out any radical changes in the basic law and with- 
out any serious blow to the radio structure built up 
during the past few years by the Federal Radio 
Commission. 

Broad powers arc given the Commission by the 
act. It provides that no one can operate any appa- 
ratus for transmission of radio within the United 
States or its possessions without first obtaining a 
license from the Commission. 

For some time after its organization the Com- 
mission was obliged to devote the major portion of 
its time to straightening out the tangle in the 
broadcasting band. With only ninety channels 
available, it was found humanly impossible to take 
care of the 732 licensed broadcasters without caus- 
ing much interference. Such rigid rules and regu- 
lations were adopted by the Commission that ap- 
proximately HO broadcasters surrendered their 
licenses. There are still entirely too many radio sta- 
tions broadcasting on the air — 618 — to insure good 
reception. Occasionally the Commission licenses a 
new station to serve some isolated section. 




The welfare of the listeners has been the para- 
mount consideration of the Commission in its allo- 
cation of radio facilities, and special efforts arc be- 
ing made to take care of small stations because of 
their community appeal. 

Under the Radio Act of 1927, the United States 
is divided into five zones. 

The first zone, represented by Mr. Starbuck, 
consists of Maine, New Hampshire, Vermont, Mas- 
sachusetts, Connecticut, Rhode Island, New York, 
New Jersey, Delaware, Maryland, the District of 
Columbia, and, in addition, Porto Rico and the Vir- 
gin Islands. 

The second zone, represented by Judge Robin- 
son, consists of Pennsylvania, Virginia] West Vir- 
ginia, Ohio, Michigan and Kentucky. 

The third zone, represented by Judge Sykcs, 
consists of North Carolina, South Carolina, Georgia, 
Florida, Alabama, Tennessee, Mississippi, Arkansas, 
Louisiana, Texas and Oklahoma. 

The fourth zone, represented by General Zaltz- 
man, consists of Indiana, Illinois, Wisconsin, Min- 
nesota, North Dakota, South Dakota, Iowa, Ne- 
braska, Kansas and Missouri. 

The fifth zone, represented by Mr. I.afount, 
consists of Montana, Idaho, Wyoming, Colorado, 
New Mexico, Arizona, Utah, Nevada, Washington, 
Oregon, California and the Territories of I l.iw.iii 
and Alaska. 

The present setup oi broadcasting stations is 
due largely to the adoption by the seventieth Con- 
gress of an amendment to the R.nlio Act of 1927, 
sponsored by Representative Edwin I , Davis, of Ten- 
nessee, which provides th.u "the licensing authority 
shall, as nearly as possible, make and maintain an 
equal allocation of broadcasting licenses, of bands 
of frequency or wavelengths, of periods of time for 
operation, and of station power to each of the five 
zones, when and in so far as there arc applications." 

That amendment also provided for a "fair and 
equitable distribution of radio facilities within the 
zones and possessions of the United States, within 
each zone, according to the population." 

Official basis for an allocation of radio facilities 
to conform with the Davis Amendment was pro- 



Page 4 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



yided by the Commission by General Order No. 40, 
adopted Aug. 3 0, 1928. 

That order provides for "local" stations of 50 
to 100 watts each; "regional" stations with power 
ranging from 250 to 1,000 watts, and "cleared 
channel" stations of 5,000 watts or more. 

Provision was made under that order for 150 
full-time local stations, or 30 for each zone; 125 
full-time regional stations, or 25 per zone, and 40 
cleared-channel stations, or 8 for each zone. 

This classification and division of facilities was 
adopted after much study and upon the approval 
of the leading radio engineers. It was felt that this 
method would provide a fair and equitable distribu- 
tion of radio facilities throughout the country. 

Special attention has been given to permits for 
local and regional stations because of their special 
community appeal. 

Because more than half of our people live more 
than one hundred miles from any transmitter, the 
Commission felt that, in order to provide farmers, 
ranchers and other rural residents with good radio, 
it is necessary to authorize the use of exclusive 
channels by a group of relatively high-powered sta- 
tions because of their vast service area. 

Radio development in various directions, in fact, 
staggers human imagination, and the Commission is 
vested with the heavy responsibility of seeing that 
this wonderful discovery is utilized for the educa- 
tion and advancement of American people. 

A great many of the listening public think that 
the Federal Radio Commission confines its activities 
solely to broadcasting. This is far from true. 
Broadcasting is only one of the children of the 
Commission's large family. The use of radio for 
our ships, for aviation, for communication with for- 
eign lands and between cities in our own country, 
the use of radio for experimentation and technical 
research, for amateurs and for a long list of other 
things — all these come under the responsibilities of 
the Commission. 

The activities of the Commission are not lim- 
ited to radio in the United States. Our ship stations 
and the big communication stations reach receiving 
stations in all parts of the world. The Commission 
is not only anxious to provide good broadcasting to 
every farm, hamlet, town and city in the United 
States, but it is concerned with interference trou- 
bles in South Africa, China and other distant lands. 

Many duties devolve on the Commission. For 
instance, to mention only a few: 

Each month the Commission considers hundreds 
of applications for radio licenses for a wide range 
of uses. If the Commission is to safeguard the in- 
terests of the public, it must devote much time and 
study to these applications. It is no easy matter to 
apply wisely and fairly the intangible yardstick 
"public interest, convenience and necessity," pro- 
vided by law in allocating radio facilities. 

In many cases, before a license is issued or de- 
nied, a public hearing must be held in accordance 
with the law. These hearings must be conducted 
with much care, as many decisions of the Commis- 
sion are carried to the courts. The Commission 
must see that the terms of the licenses are carried 
out when the station commences operating. 

The Commission is required by the law to as- 
sign bands of frequencies or wavelengths to the 
various classes of service, such as aviation, commu- 
nication, broadcasting, etc. As the daily demand 
for these facilities constantly exceeds the supply 
available, this duty is one requiring much study and 
ingenuity. In making grants for any use of the 
air, the Commission aims to make allocations only 
for public service for the benefit of the greatest pos- 
sible number of people. 

The Commission is required to regulate the kind 
of apparatus used by stations in order that listeners 



may receive signals of clearness and exactness. This 
duty involves many technical considerations. 

Radio listeners frequently express dissatisfaction 
to the Commission on account of the quality of 
programs or material broadcast by stations in their 
community. The law does not give the Commis- 
sion the right to censor programs except to exclude 
obscene, indecent or profane language. 

After all, the listeners are the real censors of 
programs, and the broadcasters for the most part 
are trying hard to please them. Broadcasting is a 
business, and its success depends largely upon the 
popularity of the station. The broadcaster is like a 
storekeeper, trying to attract new customers all the 
time. He knows that, if his programs offend or are 
uninteresting, the listeners will "tune him out" and 
turn to another program. So we have a healthy and 
spirited rivalry among broadcasters in many com- 
munities in efforts to please the public. 

As a result of these factors the listeners have 
kept broadcasting in the United States upon a high 
plane — the best in the world. 



Radio Commission "Who's Who" 

MAJ.-GEN. CHARLES McKINLEY SALTZ- 
MAN, chairman of the Federal Radio Commission, 
was born at Panora, la., Oct. 18, 1871, and was 
graduated at the U. S. Military Academy in 1896. 

He was an honor graduate at the Army Signal 
School in 1906, and was graduated at the Army 
War College in 1921. 

General Saltzman is one of the world's best- 
known authorities on radio in all its practical uses. 
In the early days, even when radio was considered 
by many as a plaything or toy, General Saltzman 
quickly visualized its possibilities, and for years he 
has given serious thought and study to its develop- 
ment. He has always been in the front "radio 
ranks." 

Back in 1913, General Saltzman was signal offi- 
cer in the U S. Army, Eastern Department, and 
served in the same capacity in the Canal Zone in 
1915-1916. On Sept. 1, 1916, he was appointed 
executive officer in the office of the signal officer, 
and was named chief signal officer with the rank 
of major-general Jan. 9, 1924. 

In his work on the Radio Commission, General 
Saltzman has found a wonderful opportunity to 
apply his remarkable executive ability and skill in 
organizing and co-ordinating the work of the vari- 
ous divisions, thus eliminating much lost motion 
and overlapping of duties. 

HAROLD A. LAFOUNT was born at Birming- 
ham, England, on Jan. 5, 1880, the son of Robert 
A. and Emily Hewitt Lafount. When a mere child 
his family moved to Logan, Utah, where he received 
his early education in the public schools. He was 
graduated at the Logan High School and at the 
Agricultural College at Logan. 

He was engaged in various business enterprises 
before his appointment as a radio commissioner. 
His activities included the management or partner- 
ship in the following concerns: Pacific Land and 
Water Company, Raft River Reclamation Com- 
pany, Stevell Townsitc Company, Lovett Townsitc 
Company, publisher Stevell Times, Consolidated 
Service Bridge Reservoir Company, Great Western 
Radio Corporation — all of Salt Lake City. He is 
also active in the Latter-day Saints Church, in 
which he is a bishop. 

Si 

JUDGE IRA ELLSWORTH ROBINSON was 
appointed by President Coolidge to the Federal Ra- 
dio Commission from the second zone on March 29, 
1928. He was elected chairman Apr. 5, 1928, and 



served in that capacity until Feb. 28, 1930, when 
he was succeeded as head of the Commission by 
Maj.-Gen. C. McK. Saltzman. 

Judge Robinson was born near Grafton, W. Va., 
on Sept. 16, 1869. He was graduated from Fair- 
mont State Normal School in 1889, and studied law 
at the University of Virginia in 1890. He was 
admitted to the bar in 1891, and began practice at 
Grafton in the same year. 

He was prosecuting attorney for Taylor County, 
W. Va., from 1896 to 1900, and was elected a 
member of the West Virginia Senate, serving from 
1902 to 1904. He served as regent for the West 
Virginia Normal Schools from 1901 to 1907. He 
was elected on Nov. 8, 1906, as a judge of the 
Supreme Court of Appeals, after having been ap- 
pointed in October, 1907, by the Governor to fill 
this vacancy. He resigned from the Supreme Court 
of Appeals on Oct. 26, 1915, having served as 
chief justice of this court since 1910. He Was a 
Republican nominee for Governor for West Vir- 
ginia in 1916. He was chairman of the Draft Ap- 
peals Board from 1917 to 1918. 

He was a lecturer at West Virginia University 
College of Law and at Northwestern University, 
Chicago, 111., in 1920; he is a member of the Amer- 
ican Institute of Criminal Law and Criminology, 
and served as its president from 1915 to 1916; and 
is a member of the American Bar Association, be- 
ing chairman of the criminal-law section. In 1921 
Judge Robinson was appointed by the Secretary of 
Interior to adjudicate war minerals claims. He is 
a contributor to several legal periodicals. 



WILLIAM D. L. STARBUCK was appointed 
by President Hoover from the first zone to serve on 
the Federal Radio Commission. He took office May 
1, 1929, succeeding O. H. Caldwell, of New York 
City, who resigned Feb. 23, 1929. 

Mr. Starbuck was born in New York City in 
18 86, and received his elementary education in the 
public schools of that city. He attended Columbia 
University and was graduated from that institution 
in 1907. 

He is both an engineer and a lawyer. For a 
number of years he specialized in patent law in New 
York City. 

During the World War, Mr. Starbuck served 
overseas for more than two years. 

His radio experience is extensive* His training 
as a mechanical engineer was capitalized in the 
building of radio sets and in experimentation when 
radio was in its infancy. 

As a member of the Federal Radio Commission, 
Mr. Starbuck is the supervisor of the Engineering 
Department, and he has devoted much time and 
study to ways and means by which radio can be of 

service to aviation. 

. 

JUDGE EUGENE OCTAVE SYKES is one of 
the five original members of the Federal Radio Com- 
mission and took office March 15, 1927. When the 
Commission was first organized, he was named vice- 
chairman and has served in that capacity ever since. 

Judge Sykes was born at Aberdeen, Miss., on 
July 16, 1876. He was a student at St. John's 
College, Annapolis, Md., and at the U. S. Naval 
Academy. He received his LL.B. degree at the 
University of Mississippi in 1897, and began the 
practice of law at Aberdeen, Miss. He was Demo- 
cratic Presidential elector-at-large from Mississippi 
in 1904. He was appointed a justice of the Supremo 
Court of Mississippi in 1916, and was elected to the 
same office the same year for a term ending 1924. 
He voluntarily retired from the bench in 1924 and 
resumed the practice of law. 



April, 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 







The wee small hours of the morning usually find WAYNE 
KING leading one of his orchestras in popular melodies, either from 
the Chicago studios of NBC or from a local Chicago station. 



MARLEY R. SHERRIS, who announces the National Youth 
Conference each Sunday afternoon and Midweek Hymn Sing on 
Wednesdays, among others, has a particularly ardent following 
among the listening public, judging from the number of requests 
that we have received to print his picture. 



BEN BERNIE is another of that small group of orchestra leaders who 
through radio is known and admired by every lover of dance music. At 
present Ben is in Chicago, but cither the chains or local stations carry his 
music and his whimsical patter every night. 





toe 
mold 



Next we discover the old, red-headed music-maker, our own WEN HALL, replaying a 
golf match with CAMPBELL ARNOUX, director of KTHS at Hot Springs, Ark. "Wen" 
is back with NBC, although his present program is carried only by the Pacific Coast chain. 

COON-SANDERS ORCHESTRA has been with radio since radio broadcasting began. 
This group is as popular as it was in the early days, and is heard from coast to coast on 
Tuesday nights when the Florsheim Frolic takes the air. 

BILLY ARTZT and orchestra have many radio engagements, but their latest 
calls for costumes quite out of the ordinary- — they arc broadcasting over NBC each 
Wednesday evening as the Conti Gondoliers. 



PAT KELLY's title at NBC is "supervisor of announcers." Nevertheless, 
he finds time not only to do some announcing himself, but is heard occa- 
sionally as a tenor soloist. It is as a soloist that he has won 
a following among the fans. 



EDWARD THORGERSEN announces three of the few 
hour-long programs left on the chain schedules. All three 
are programs by B. A. Rolfe and his Lucky Strike Dance 
Orchestra. 



WADE ARNOLD is one of the playwrights who have 
recently invaded the broadcasting field. He is author of 
"The Campus" (Saturday evenings at nine) and plays one 
of the leading roles in the sketches. By the way, "The 
Campus" is developing some worth-while humor. 



It is interesting to note that four of the nine NBC art- 
ists pictured on this page broadcast through the Chicago 
studios. More and more the chains arc becoming truly 
national in character, and are using the talent of the middle 
West and the far West, as well as of the East, for their 
programs. 








1 




mbell 



illy-^KJ 



Page 6 



WHAT'S ON THE A I It 



April, 1931 



Owles £Wee Adams " ^ 



£y 



THE announcer pronounced the sponsor's bene- 
diction on the listening millions. The program 
was over. "Really quite amusing," the man at the 
dial remarked with a whimsical chuckle, as he tuned 
to another station. 

"That hooey?" his friend snorted disgustedly. 
"If you ask me, it's a crime." 

"Not the advertising; the announcer," the other 
explained good-humoredly. "Local boy makes good. 
Pride of Pumpkin Center goes to top on big chain. 
Can't you just hear him thinking that every time 
he opens his mouth, hoping all the folks back home 
are listening to him with proper awe and admira- 
tion?" 

His friend grinned. "By golly, you're right! I 
hadn't exactly thought of it like that. But now 
you mention it, I'll bet he was a riot in his own 
home town. They will give themselves away, won't 
they?" 

As a matter of cold fact, neither of these listen- 
ers had so much as a crumb of gossip about the past 
life of this announcer. Yet here they were, piecing 
together a set of rather personal details simply from 
hearing his voice as it was wafted to them over the 
cluttered kilocycles. 

Call it deduction or just jumping at conclu- 
sions, as you choose. But in either case eight out of 
ten listeners are engaged in the same interesting, if 
hazardous, pastime every day. 

"What you are speaks so loud I can't hear what 
you say." So Emerson is said to have observed 
many years ago. And that shrewd probe into hu- 
man nature still holds good. But, since radio came 
along, the familiar saying might be brought up to 
date by changing it to: "Your voice tells me so 
much I hardly need to listen to your words." At 
least, that is how it works out, pretty much wher- 
ever receiver dials are twisted. 

As was suggested a paragraph or two ago, most 
listeners- — consciously or unconsciously — have ac- 
quired the knack of forming a surprisingly com- 
plete notion of a person simply by hearing his voice 
through a loud-speaker. 

Ordinarily we rely on appearance to do that. 
We say, "He looks like he can be trusted;" or, "He 
looks like a slippery customer;" and we think we 
have good reasons for those opinions. However — 
thanks to radio — we are finding out by this time 
that the voice also tells us much about people, some- 
times much more than we might suspect it could. 

For instance, a popular harmony team was do- 
ing some comedy patter between its songs. "That 
must be the fat one," a woman listener decided, as 
one of the two uncorked a wisecrack. 

It turned out that she had seen a photograph of 
the pair, noted that one was fat and the other thin, 
but, as so often happens, forgotten which was 
which. Now, hearing their act, she picked out the 
plump boy by his voice — a test she doubtless would 
not have trusted before radio taught her to use her 
ears as well as her eyes. 

Now and then, of course, a voice does fool us. 
The classic example in this line is W. K. Henderson, 
who holds forth down Shrcveport way. When he 
was heard first by a nation-wide audience, people 
referred to him as "that old man at KWKH." Esti- 
mates of his age started at sixty and ran well above 
eighty. But, as a matter of vital statistics, he is 
still in his forties. 




-==ES3j J JONES' 




HE WAS A RIOT IN HIS OWN HOME TOWN. 

However, misses like that are rare. Listeners 
seldom go so far wrong on such fundamentals as 
age and physique in their deductions from voices. 

But the really interesting and important part of 
the business is that listeners come to know so much 
more than the police-description details of a broad- 
casting personality simply by hearing his voice. 

For instance, there is Roxy. Probably several 
thousand people know him personally. Probably 
several hundred thousand know something about 
him through magazine articles. But several millions 
have a pretty accurate notion of what sort of a 
chap he is merely through having heard his voice 
on the radio. 

Some of them have seen his photographs, of 
course. Many more have not. Yet, if they did, or 
even saw him in person, their opinions of the genial 
impressario, formed from hearing his voice, doubt- 
less would not have to be revised. That is how 
strong an impression of personality can be built up 
through the loud-speaker. 

A similar example is Dr. Julius Klein, the As- 
sistant Secretary of Commerce, whose weekly talks 
have been such an interesting Columbia feature. 
Many business men know him personally. More 
have read his magazine articles. But many more 
who have not met him or read his articles, who in 
fact may not have even a direct interest in business, 
have come to know his engaging personality by 
hearing his voice. 



KEUO 

WORLD, 

DOSCONE 




W. K. 
HENDERSON. 



The list could be extended through pages of 
print. But every reader can supply other instances 
from his own radio acquaintances. 

Also, he can think of cases — like the one cited 
at the outset — where traits and foibles, which those 
at the microphone may not even care to admit, 
stand out like the proverbial sore thumb. The voice 
has a way of doing that. 

The explanation seems to be that broadcasting 
performers, like most eye-minded mortals, still think 
first of appearances. Could we see them, their facial 
expressions probably would tell us little. But their 
voices, not so carefully guarded, tell us the whole 
story. 

Let an announcer, a news commentator, a pub- 
lic speaker, or even an actor, come before the micro- 
phone often enough, and we at the dials can tell 
pretty well what sort he is: if he is conceited, a 
sham, earnest, quick-witted, grouchy, cold, good- 
humored, lazy, smug, bitter, suave, a bluffer, or 
what have you. Voices do that, sometimes to an 
extent that might cause their owners to squirm 
mighty uncomfortably if they but knew. 

However, disregarding the merely personal, the 
most useful result of all this is that it gives the 
listener a one-sided speaking acquaintance with the 
public figures of the moment. True enough, for 
those of us who like to contribute our share (or 
more) to a conversation, this may not be as desira- 
ble as a two-sided speaking acquaintance. But it is 
considerably better than no speaking acquaintance. 

Consider, for instance, such diverse personages 
as President Hoover, John D. Rockefeller, Jr., 
Knute Rockne, Kathleen Norris, Evangeline Booth 
and Mrs. August Belmont. We have seen their 
photographs and read their published utterances or 
works at one time or another. But, no matter how 
clear-cut and vivid our impression of them is, it has 
been rounded out and given life by hearing their 
voices from our loud-speakers. That is not strange 
either, for the sound of the living voice is the near- 
est thing to personal contact. 

Sometimes, to be sure, our previously sketched 
opinion has to be revised. We say, "He isn't what 
I thought he would be like." But again the change 
takes the other direction. We say, "She's much 
more human than I expected." In either case one- 
way contact has been made and a chance for ap- 
praising character provided which would not be 
possible on a mass scale without broadcasting. 

Eventually that very thing may turn out to be 
one of radio's greatest contributions to our national 
life. When you and I, in our homes, can arrive at 
a nearly first-hand judgment of those who seek to 
direct our destinies, certainly the odds in favor of 
an intelligent democracy are much increased; for by 
their voices we do know them. 



April, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 7 




& 




GEORGE BEUCHLER was a favorite CBS announcer before it 
was discovered in radio circles that he was also a singer of exceptional 
talent. Now it appears that he will be heard more frequently as a 
soloist than as an announcer. He has been scheduled as soloist for 
several of Columbia's sustaining programs. 

TOBE', who gathers fashion news from all sources in Europe and 
America, will be the guest speaker at 11:45 a. m., E. S. T., on Apri 
16, when Peter Pan Forecasts goes on the air over an international CBS 
network. Every Thursday some man or woman of unusual prestige 
in the world of fashions is presented to the women of America during 
this program. 

MARIE GERARD's maiden name was Marie Opfingcr, but, when 
she discovered that the listeners found "Opfingcr" difficult, she adopted 
"Gerard." She and Charles Touchettc, "piano pal" of her brother, 
Adolph Opfingcr, decided to change her name to "Touchettc" — and 
did — by means of a wedding last November. The name "Gerard" 
seems to have brought her good luck, for with it she became an imme- 
diate success on the air. She is a CBS staff soprano, but is quite fre- 
quently heard as guest artist on commercial programs. At present she 
is active at the Radio Round-up, Thursday nights at 11:30. 

HARRY VON ZELL, who won his place as a CBS announcer when 
Old Gold first went on the air with Paul Whitcman, will be master 
of ceremonies for the new series of Van Hcusen programs which will 
be heard over CBS on Friday nights at ten (E. S. T.). DON BALL 
(across the page) will be the announcer for this period. Don and 
Harry have often worked together. Many listeners remember their 
work when they were associated in the Henry-George programs. 

PAT FLANAGAN, popular Chicago sports announcer, at home 
with the audience of WBBM, CBS key station in Chicago, had an in- 
teresting experience during March when he was master of ceremonies 
for the "Champion Skaters," a juvenile novelty carried over the CBS 
chain. 

ROSALINE GREENE, radio actress remembered for her work in 
the "Famous Loves" series put on over NBC by Natural Bridge Shoes 
last year, has been introduced to CBS listeners this season as the mur- 
deress in the "Eno Crime Club" thriller broadcast every week night at 
6:45, E. S. T. 

DOROTHEA JAMES, whose beauty, dancing and singing have 
graced such productions as "Strike Up the Band," "Good News" and 
more recently "Princess Charming," loaned the last-named talent to 
the broadcast of "Radio Round-up" over the W ABC-Columbia 
network, Thursday, March 5, at 11:30 p. M., E. S. T. This pro- 
gram marked Miss James' debut as a radio artist. In addition 
to her stage experience, she has appeared in motion pictures 
since childhood, her first important role occurring in "School 
Days," opposite Wesley Barry. For several years 
the versatile young lady performed as a protege 
of Gus Edwards. 




~flarry 

lonZell 



^jPora/ine (jreene 




Page 8 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April. 1931 



Jookfnc^ f Jrirocr^i 1 ^ e ^Ju clfoscope 



Peter Dixon, whose "Raising Junior" is a 
regular feature of the NBC, hopes to get time 
for a short trip to Europe this summer. 



If all the mash notes to Vallee were placed 
end to end, there would be enough mush to 
feed the unemployed for the next twenty 
years. — Pathfinder. 



"Have you any early American furniture?" 
"Oh, yes. We still use a battery radio set." 
-Life. 



Just to settle all those bridge-table argu- 
ments about it, the present orchestra arrange- 
ments in the playing of "Perfect Song," theme 
song for Amos 'n' Andy, is composed of three 
violins, one 'cello, one saxophone and a piano. 



W2XAF, Schenectady's 31.48-meter experi- 
mental transmitter, is in use each Saturday at 
1 1 p. M., to communicate with the Syracuse 
University Andean Expedition, now in the far 
interior of Venezuela. 



At the close of 1930 there were 444,676 
radio receiving sets in operation in Canada, for 
which the annual license fee of one dollar re- 
quired by the Canadian Government had been 
paid. 



Soviet Russia will place in operation twenty- 
two additional broadcasting stations of 100,- 
000-watt power in 1931. The U. S. S. R. 
plan calls for a total of about two hundred 




stations, of which forty-five are to have twice 
the power now permitted to a maximum of 
twenty stations in the United States. 



WGBS, New York, lost its appeal from the 
decision of the Federal Radio Commission re- 
fusing to license it to broadcast with a fre- 
quency of 600 kilocycles. It will probably 
be heard at 1180 hereafter. 



Germany has completed at Muehlaeker, near 
Stuttgart, the first of a group of ten super- 
power broadcasting stations with which the 
German Ministry of Posts expects to overcome 
interference now caused by the new and pow- 
erful Soviet stations. 



As a result of court action, the Federal 
Commission will soon announce a shifting of 
several station assignments in order to give re- 
lief to Station WTMJ, of Milwaukee, which 
now finds its service area very limited. It 
seems probable that WLBZ, Bangor; WFLA. 
WSUN and WDAE of Florida Ml be affected. 



A letter has been received by Station WGN 
from William Jacobs, theatrical booking agent 
of Chicago, who is in the South Sea Islands to 
bring back fire walkers to Chicago for the 
Century of Progress Exposition in 193 3. Mr. 
Jacobs said that he received a Verne Buck 
Orchestra program very distinctly. 



Seventy-five program ideas were submitted 
to NBC in a recent week by motion-picture 
and theatrical figures. The first days of spring 
brought an influx of Broadway talent troop- 
ing into the studios, hoping to land micro- 
phone spots before the anticipated summer 
theatrical slump materialized. 



Lily Pons, 1931 Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany soprano sensation, who makes her radio 
debut over an NBC network Sunday, April 5, 
was started on her singing career by her hus- 
band, a Dutch lawyer. 



5g 



John Royal, NBC's new program director, 
was in the theatrical profession for eighteen 
years before taking charge at WTAM, Cleve- 
land, from whence he was drafted to the net- 
work post. Prior 
to his association 
with the theatre 
Royal was a news- 
paper man. 




Marie Gerard, the 
soprano, says that 
the only conditions 
which cause her 
uneasiness when be- 
fore the micro- 
phone are when she 

knows the program is being carried on a na- 
tion-wide network and when friends write her 
that they will listen in. 



Mabel Garrison, celebrated soprano of the 
opera and concert stage, is singing each Tues- 
day from 8:30 to 9 P. M., E. S. T., over 
WBAL, Baltimore. Miss Garrison is one of 
the very few native-born Americans who have 
achieved world-wide fame without studying 
abroad. She is a Baltimorean by birth and a 
graduate of Peabody Conservatory. 



Madame Frances Alda, heard regularly 
through NBC networks in the Boscul pro- 
grams, is a native of New Zealand. She left 
that country when a child and was raised by 
her grandparents in Australia, San Francisco 
and Paris. Every few years, however, she is 
called upon for a tour of the Antipodes. 



We shall have to wait until fall to learn the 
name of the 1931 diction award winner. The 
committee of judges of the American Academy 
of Arts and Letters will continue to listen 
critically to the dulcet tones of announcers 
during the summer months. 



An examiner for the Federal Radio Com- 
mission, in submitting a report recommending 
against permitting KWKH, "Hello, World!" 
station at Shreveport, to increase its power, 
stated that the "sole stockholder of the licensee 
company," who is 
Mr. Henderson, col- 
lected more than 
s372,500 by solici- 
tations and direct 
selling of goods via 
his station last year, 
and that this 
amount was largely 
profit. 



Al — My wife and I had a great argument 
last week. She wanted a roadster and I re- 
fused to buy it because, as I contended, a 
closed car is more practical. 

Brad — Does she like the new roadster? 



Rosaline Greene is another veteran of the 
air-waves. The NBC dramatic actress recently 
celebrated her seventh anniversary on the air. 
She broke in at WGY, Schenectady, with the 
first radio dramatic company ever to be 
formed. She recalls that she almost missed her 
inaugural broadcast because the automobile in 
which she was riding to the studio became 
stuck in a snow-bank. 






Little Jack Little, "speakeasy of the bari- 
tones," who was recently brought from WLW, 
Cincinnati, by NBC and put on the networks, 
was among the first to use the new "whisper- 
ing" microphone. The new "mike," an inno- 
vation of NBC en- 
gineers, has a long 
extension which 

enables those who 
play their own ac- 
companiment to 
sing with a mini- 
mum of bending 
forward. 




Vaughn de Leath, 
"Original Radio 

Girl," is back on 
the NBC networks 
after an absence 

of almost a year. During that time she has 
traveled extensively in Europe, and recently 
has been featured over WTAM, Cleveland's 
50,000-watt station. Miss de Leath returned 
to the network Sunday, March 15, in a pro- 
gram arranged especially for her bv the NBC 
Artists' Service. 



1 1. ill .i do/en spring and c.irh slimmer turf 
events arc being arranged by NBC through the 
co-operation of Clem McCarthy, noted race 
announcer. McCarthy, who has been follow- 
ing the horses for more than twenty years; has 
definitely determined to do the Kentucky 
Derby at Louisville early in May, and plans 
are under consideration for broadcasting sc\ - 
eral of the big Fastern track events. 



Jlldg 
madam? 

Witftes\ — I'm around thirty. 

lnJ;<c Whipple — So I perceive. Now, how 
many years is it since you got around it? 



The opening of 
the baseball season 
this month will 
find Bill Munday, NBC sports announcer, 
abandoning the microphone for the training- 
camp. Munday, a sports writer for the 
Atlanta fournal, will follow the Crackers 
to their limbering-up camp and indulge in a 
few workouts himself. He is a former pro- 
fessional baseball pitcher and likes nothing bet- 
ter than lobbing them up to the batters in the 
pre-season activities. 



Few listeners to the more popular chain or- 
chestras have any idea of the investment in- 
volved in building a large and popular orches- 
tra. Just the item of musical instruments 
comes to a staggering figure. For example, 
B. A. Rolfe's Lucky Strike Orchestra has 
$53,000 invested in music-making implements 
alone, while the instruments played by the 
Symphony Orchestra led by Walter Damrosch 
inventory at the $56,000 mark. 



The National Committee on Education by 
Radio has received a gift of $200,000 to aid 
it in planning its program of educational 
broadcasting. This committee, appointed by 
U. S. Commissioner of Education William 
John Cooper, is seeking to get Congress to 
allocate 1 5 per cent, of the radio channels for 
exclusive use of stations which broadcast edu- 
cational programs. 



While entertaining with his orchestra, now 
a Columbia feature, at Les Ambassadeurs in 
Paris last summe - , Noble Sissle introduced his 
symphonic version of "Song of India." At its 
conclusion a secretary escorted him to the ta- 
ble of the Mahara- 
jah of Kapurthala. 
With a few words 
of appreciation for 
the performance, 
the Indian poten- 
tate took the jew- 
eled links from his 
own cuffs and pre- 
sented them to the 
orchestra leader. 



Whipple — And how old are you. 



System programs 

Hights. Hights b 

Philadelphia, nine 



The newest voice 
you have heard an- 
nouncing Columbia 
belongs to Jean Warren 
:gan announcing at WFI, 
years ago; taught school 
and became a movie actor in the interim be- 
fore he returned to broadcasting at Station 
WLIT (Philadelphia). There he was .succes- 
sively chief announcer and director of broad- 
casting. His major hobby is drawing — in 
pastels. A minor one is the creation of cross- 
word puzzles, some of them so complicated 
that even he can't solve them. 






John Brewster, who is "Henry" in the Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System "Henry-George" 
dramas, says that he thought the ultimate in 
speedy growth was reached five years ago when 



he played a twelve-y r ear-old boy in one play 
and ten minutes later rushed to another theatre 
to play the part of an eighty-five-year-old 
man. Brewster changed his mind during the 
Henry-George skits recently when he had to 
whine like an infant in one act, and two min- 
utes later take the role of an aged sea captain. 



Why radio script writers turn gray is seen 
in an example of the highly critical sense de- 
veloped by radio listeners. A fan, hearing 
that the sponsors of the Barbasol program on 
the Columbia network were distributing free 
toothbrushes, had this complaint to make: 

"I heard your program the other night," he 
said. "But why do you say that listeners 
should write their names and addresses on the 
'empty box in which Barbasol comes'?" How 
can the box that Barbasol comes in be empty? 
Mavbe Thurston should be consulted. 



Following an address before_ the officers of 
law and order of Duchess County, N. Y., 
where he heads for home after his Literary 
Digest broadcast over the Columbia network, 
when he was sworn in as an honorary deputy 
sheriff, receiving a shiny gold badge, Lowell 
Thomas officiated as announcer at the annual 
ball of the Patrolmen's Benevolent Association, 
speaking before more than twenty thousand 
men, women and children who crammed every 
corner of the Madison Square Garden. After 
his address, Thomas was elected an honorary 
member of the organization and given the 
president's gold badge. 

"Officer" Tommy has yet to discover 
whether the decorations will give him any in- 
fluence with traffic cops. 



Morton Downey, ybur favorite dinner-time 
tenor, once sold phonographs, insurance and 
aluminum ware. Among his outstanding ac- 
complishments: Downey sang with the Paul 
Whiteman orchestra ten years ago; opened the 




very, very exclusive Kit Kat Club in London; 
memorizes melody and lyrics at one reading; 
popularized such hits as "Among My Sou- 
venirs," "Wonderful One" and "Wonder What 
Became of Sally" (he's still wondering), as 
well as having already broken all records for 
a swift rise to popularity in the realm of radio 
broadcasting. 



Paul Dumont, whose radio association dates 
back to the early days of Station WJZ, will 
return to the anr.ouncerial staff of NBC after 
three years as production man. Dumont first 
sang over WJZ in 1923. He was accompanied 
at the piano by Keith McCleod, now NBC 
musical supervisor. The program was an- 
nounced by Milton Cross. Dumont is most 
widely known for his sports broadcasting and 
his association with the Dutch Master Min- 
strels, in which program he took the part of 
endman. 

So enthused became a group of radio listen- 
ers who tuned to the Carborundum Indian 
Ritual on a recent Saturday night, that, aside 
from writing a letter of appreciation, a dollar 
and a half wis enclosed to pay for their share 
of the entertainment. Of course their remit- 
tance was returned. This is not unfamiliar 
radio practice. Do/ens of like instances have 
been recorded when some individual type of 
program makes .in exceptional appeal to cer- 
tain listeners. 



\i\i.m Holt, singer and actress on the staff 
of Columbia's Radio Home-Makers' Club, was 
born to the theatre of parents who had been 
troupers throughout their lives. One of the 
earliest incidents indicative of her instinctive 
knowledge of acting occurred when Miss Holt 
was just four years old. Traveling with her 
mother and father in a repertory company, she 
became ill and her parents were forced to leave 
her alone at the hotel so they could "go on 
with the show." When the curtain fell on 
the last act, her mother rushed back to the 



April, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 



"Martha tftt wood 




-ftmbrosef.Weemr 



Jfedy 1/ciHee 



RAYMOND KNIGHT is not only "Ambrose J. Wcems" of "Cuckoo" fame (Saturday at 10 p. m.), but, as "Bill Borcalis," presides over the Clicquot Nigh/ Club. 
MARTHA ATWOOD, NBC soprano, is heard on several sustaining programs each week. And now IRENE BORDONI is a regular radio artist; as Co/y's Playgirl, she may be 
heard over CBS each Sunday evening at nine. The same wavy hair, but an even jollier smile, marks this new picture of RUDY VALLEE, which will go straight from this 
page into the scrap-books of all Rudy Vallee Club members. 



hotel, only to find the lobby desolate. Not a 
bell-hop graced the staircase and there were 
no guests to be seen. Mrs. Holt sped upstairs 
in panic, which grew more intense as she 
espied a crowd gathered at the door of her 
daughter's room. Fearfully she joined the 
group and saw Vivian standing on the bed in 
night-dress, reciting lines from "Hamlet" to 
an appreciative audience. 



Radio's littlest actress is Edith Thayer, the 
Jane McGrew of Hank Simmons' Showboat. 
She is four feet eleven inches short. Aside 
from her dramatic ability, Miss Thayer has 
won considerable fame as a soprano. She sang 
leading roles in the original companies of "The 
Firefly," "Pom, Pom," "The Geisha," "The 
Chocolate Soldier," "Naughty Marietta," and 
others. 



While still in White Plains High School, 
Bert Lown, WABC-Columbia orchestra leader, 
rounded up a group of musicians who ob- 
tained dozens of dance engagements and finally 
attracted the attention of Frank Munson, head 



of the Munson Steamship Lines. When the 
shipping magnate lightly suggested one night 
that they might sail for South America aboard 
one of his steamers, the band of striplings ap- 
peared aboard a Munson liner the next morn- 
ing just as it was about to sail. Taken by 
their audacity, Munson engaged them, and, 
before they had time to realize what was hap- 
pening, Bert and his fellows were steaming 
down New York harbor and wondering how 
they could explain the sudden departure to 
their families. 



Richard Gordon, who plays Sherlock Holmes 
in the NBC dramas founded upon the famous 
Conan Doyle stories, and heard Monday nights 
through the NBC network, was rushing to a 
rehearsal in the New York studios. The 
hostess informed him that the rehearsal was 
scheduled for Studio D. For the moment 
Gordon could not recall on what floor the 
studio was located. He inquired of a page- 
boy. 

"Down the west corridor," directed the 
page, and turned to the hostess. "Gosh!" com- 
mented the youth, "Sherlock Holmes — and he 
can't find a studio!" 



Miss Louise Rice, who is heard each Thurs- 
day morning on an NBC-WJZ network, re- 
cently had an amusing experience. Miss Rice 
offers to analyze the handwriting of her radio 
listeners. A letter came to her from one of 
her radio audience, asking for a character 
analysis of the handwriting. This enterprising 
person not only typed the entire letter, but 
also typed her name and address. Miss Rice 
has been in a quandary as to how she can send 
an analysis, as she has not as yet been able to 
discover character in typewriting. 



Don Becker, of WLW, has adopted the title 
of "ukulele consultant," since a recent morn- 
ing when a little girl called him on the phone 
at the conclusion of one of his early ukulele 
programs. 

"Please, Mr. Becker, I can't get my ukulele 
tuned right. Will you listen to it?" her shrill 
voice piped. Then, plink, plink, plink, plink, 
came over the wires as she plucked each string. 

"Tunc the G string a little higher," advised 
Becker, and listened while the little miss 
brought the string up to pitch and hung up 
with a thrilled "Thank you." 



Ernie Hare and Billy Jones, heard weekly 
through an NBC network as the Interwoven 
Pair, have been broadcasting regularly since 
1921. In October of that year they faced a 
microphone, looking like "a tomato can hung 
from a crane," in the washroom studio of old 
WJZ in Newark. They did a program of 
songs and patter — exactly the same type they 
do to-day — that lasted an hour and a half. At 
the end of Jones' and Hare's ninety minutes 
their accompanist put the station's first piano 
concert on the air, against the protest of the 
program director, who didn't know how such 
an innovation "would take." Two minutes 
later officials of the Westinghousc Electric and 
Manufacturing Company, listening in from 
half a block away, called with congratulations. 



Brad Sutton has joined National Radio Ad- 
vertising, Inc., as director of dramatic pro- 
grams. He is the same Brad Sutton who is 
known to millions as "Old Forty Fathom;" 
the same Brad Sutton who went down to the 
sea to broadcast, for the first time in radio 
history, a program from the sea. 




ytlelrjlle, 



Jeanne €anol 



jYa/daf/ardi 



yponaJrilon 



Jimmie (jveen _ 



MELVILLE RAY came out of the World War with thirteen wound stripes and no profession. He was singing in a harvest-field when an opera singer heard him and tent 
him to Cincinnati to Dan Beddoe. Now he is one of WLWt most popular tenors. JEANNE CARROL, contralto; NAI.DA NARDI, program director of WMCA and 
WPCH, and MONA TRILON, soprano, are featured in the "New York Notes" (p. 12, this issue). JIMMIE GREEN and his orchestra have made a host <<l friends while 
broadcasting from WHAS in Louisville in March. (This picture is used by courtesy of the Musk Corporation of America, in answer to the requests of many listeners.) 



Page 10 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 




Norman Brokenshire, Columbia announcer, 
pulled a bone when he said his No. 11 /4s were 
the biggest feet in radiodom. "Tiny" Berman, 
Gargantuan bass player of the Merry Madcaps 
of Station WTIC, was quick to let Broken- 
shire know that he wears a No. 14 shoe, and 
that when his cobbler ships a pair to him from 
New York they come in separate boxes — one 
shoe to the box. 



Radio Announcer — Give me some of that 
prepared monoaceticacidester of salicylicacid. 

Druggist — Do you mean aspirin? 

R. A.— Yeh! I never can think of that 
name. 



Friday nights are busy nights for Maurice 
Chevalier as the days for outdoor sports draw 
nearer. The French comedian, heard weekly 
through an NBC network on the Chase and 
Sanborn program, holds open house for repre- 
sentatives of music-publishing houses on that 
night. Also it is fight night at Madison Square 
Garden, and the entertainer hasn't missed a 
bout there since he has been in the United 
States. He is an inveterate fight fan, and from 
the opening bell of the first preliminary can 
be heard rooting lustily for his favorite scrap- 
per. 



His colleagues of the Hawaiian troupe of 
Station WTIC, of Hartford, are telling a story 
at the expense of Bob Nawahine, one of the 
Ilima Islanders of the WTIC staff. Bob fell 
asleep while listening to his radio at two 
o'clock one morning. When he awoke it was 
daylight, and to his sleep-drugged senses came 
the terrifying realization that the Ilima Island- 
ers were on the air. He lost no time in reach- 
ing the studios, where, to his chagrin, he 
found that the music he had been listening to 
had been broadcast by electrical transcription. 
He and his fellow-Hawaiians had made the 
record many months before. 

"You know," said old Bob, narrating the in- 
cident, "the thing that scared me most was to 
hear that bass voice. I said to myself, 'That 
bass singer's good! I'll bet he was hired to 
take my place.' " 



Each Monday, for the last six or seven 
months, Guy Lombardo has selected a new 
popular song which, in his opinion, would be- 
come a hit. The selections were given their 
radio debuts during the Robert Burns' Pana- 
tela programs on WABC and other Columbia 
stations. 

Lombardo, while going over his averages late 
last week, discovered, to his own astonishment, 
that 90 per cent, of the numbers he selected 
had become outstanding hits. Some of these 
were: "When the Organ Played at Twilight," 
"You're Driving Me Crazy," "Sweet Jenny 
Lee," "Lonesome Lover," "Blue Again" and 
"Heartaches," 

If you don't think they're hits, listen in 
any night and count how many times these 
selections are played and replayed. 



Sir Hubert Wilkins, who plans in early May 
to attempt an exploration of the Arctic re- 
gions by submarine, will apply to the Federal 
Radio Commission for authority to install a 
transmitter and to have temporary use of a 
high frequency channel so that he may broad- 
cast a running account of the expedition's ex- 
periences. If permission is granted, it is 
expected that one of the chains will arrange to 
rebroadcast his story so that it will be avail- 
able for the world-wide radio audience. Sir 
Hubert recently talked to the Australian lis- 
teners from Schenectady; his message, carried 
by one of General Elcctric's short-wave trans- 
mitters, was picked up and rebroadcast by a 
chain of Australian stations. 



A letter recently received from Stafford- 
shire, England, by Station WTIC of Hartford, 
was addressed thus: 

"Mr. Ted Waite; announcer of Grand Melo- 
dies Programme; Walter Fiffe, organist; Hard- 
foot, Connecticut." 

Proof-read, the address would appear as fol- 
lows: 

"Mr. Fred Wade, announcer of Strand Melo- 
dies Program; Walter Seifert, organist; Hart- 
ford, Connecticut." 

And how Mr. Staffordshire learned the cor- 
rect spelling of "Connecticut" is a mystery. 



Felix Ferdinando and his orchestra have 
opened an engagement at the Park Central 
Hotel, New York City, from which point 
their music will be broadcast over the Colum- 
bia network daily except Sunday. From Mon- 
days to Saturdays, inclusive, the orchestra will 
play for broadcasting from 1 to 1:30 P. M., 
E. S. T., in addition to two evening programs, 
Wednesdays at 7:15 and Fridays at 7:30. Fer- 
dinando, a lieutenant of the United States 
Marine Corps, had the distinction of conduct- 
ing the Thirteenth Regiment U. S. M. C. Band 
at the formal dedication of the Pershing Sta- 
dium at Paris in 1919. 



Within the past six months radio listeners 
have come forward in increasing numbers with 
pleas that they be permitted to "sit in" at 
broadcasting studios so that they could see 
their favorite entertainers and programs. 

So great has been the demand for studio 
guest-passes that Adolph Opfinger, Columbia 
production director, has had to resort to bor- 
rowing the theatre's technique. Hundreds of 
portable chairs, for example, have been set up 
in the unused parts of all studios. These are 
roped off and laid out much the same as 
theatre seats. 

Fire regulations 
make it necessary 
that Columbia offi- 
cials issue tickets 
for each guest per- 
mitted to enter the 
studios. Thus, just 
as in the theatre, 
the fire department 
keeps an accurate 
check on the atten- 
dance. 





The old home 
town levels all men. 
Proof lies in an 
incident that oc- 
curred recently at Station WTIC of Hartford. 

Tony Pestritto left Middletown, Conn., to 
join Aaronson's Commanders. He toured 
vaudeville; played in a Broadway show, at 
night clubs and hotels in New York, Miami, 
Chicago, Los Angeles; appeared in a couple of 
talking movies, and finally wound up by buy- 
ing a night club for himself back in Con- 
necticut. 

Jack O'Brien left Middletown to play with 
Jan Garber at Coral Gables in Florida, then 
organized a dance band and shipped on one of 
the Dollar liners, appearing in Honolulu, 
Manila, Yokohama, Calcutta, Bombay, Cairo, 
and winding up at the noted Les Ambassadeurs 
in Paris. 

Alley Wrubel left Middletown to cast his 
lot in Tin Pan Alley in the metropolis, where 
he wrote music and helped produce "The Gar- 
rick Gaieties" and "The Vanderhilt Revue." 

One night, while Tony was tooting on his 
saxophone in his Club Hollywood, in walked 
Jack O'Brien. A few minutes later in saun- 
tered Alley Wrubel. Within three minutes 
Jack was at the piano, Alley at the trumpet, 
joining Tony in a happy rendition of "You'll 
Do It Some Day," the song Alley wrote when 
the three boys were schoolmates in Middle- 
town. 



Sh-h-h! radio enters an era of mystery. 
Masked figures, romantic adventurers in dis- 
guise, voices emerging from rings of smoke — 
all part of broadcasting secrecy. 

There's no personality, for instance, quite so 
sinister nor quite so hidden and screened from 
the curious public eye as "The Shadow" of 
the Detective Story Magazine half-hour. 

For half a year they've kept his identity a 
secret, and now they offer prizes up to $1,000 
for descriptions of him. He gives his listen- 
ers a clue each week. 



Three days after he had changed the name 
of his little dog from "Trouble" to "Lucky," 
B. A. Rolfe, leader of the NBC Lucky Strike 
Dance Orchestra, was hailed before a magis- 
trate on account of the canine. "Lucky," 
mascot of the orchestra, incurred the wrath of 
a bigger dog, whose owner had the director 
arrested when the latter interfered in the fight. 



A contralto voice is heard every Monday 
night in the Robert Burns' Panatela half-hour. 
No one — except, of course, the sponsors and 
Guy Lombardo, whose orchestra accompanies 
her — knows the identity of the lady in the 
smoke. 

Visitors often come to the studio and expect 
to see the mysterious young soloist, but are 
disappointed when, just as the time for her 
entrance is reached, her voice is heard only 
through the studio loud-speaker. She sings in 
another studio! 

Then, again, there's the Old Dutch Girl 
whose early-morning broadcasts are familiar to 
many. But she's a big secret too! Here's a 
clue, though: She is permitted to sing on one 
evening program a week under her own name. 
Now do you know? 

Double sh-h-h's! Don Amaizo enters. Lis- 
teners may hear this gay Spaniard's music on 
the Columbia chain, exclusive of WABC, 
Monday evenings at 10:30 o'clock. 

Not only is the Don's identity concealed 
very carefully, but, to secure added secrecy, 
he is put on the air from studios entirely 
apart from any of the stations actually broad- 
casting his program. He never speaks. Only 
his violin is heard, although the entire pro- 
duction is built around him. 

Do you know, for instance, the real-life 
identities of Mary and Bob? These True Story 
adventurers are entering their third year of 
radio secrecy. 

Graybar "Mr. and Mrs." kept listeners guess- 
ing for months, but, all of a sudden, some one 
spilled the beans and now everybody knows 
that "Joe" is Jack Smart and "Vi" is Jane 
Houston. 



Not that it matters, but did you know 
that — 

"The Shadow," sinister mystery man of the 
underworld, actually gives clues to his identity 
at the conclusion of Defective Story broadcasts 
Thursday nights? 

Dr. Howard W. 
Haggard, who 
speaks Sundays at 8 
p. m. for Eastman 
Kodak Company on 
"Devils, Drugs and 
Doctors," is one of 
the inventors of the 
much - mentioned 
"H. & H. Inhala- 
tor"? 

"Hank Simmons' 
Showboat," one of 
radio's oldest dra- 
matic productions 
and which has re- 
tained its original 
cast since its incep- 
third anniversary in 




2^L 



tion, will celebrate its 
June? 

Richie Craig ; Jr., Blue Ribbon Malt Jester, 
presents half of his radio act Tuesday nights 
lying prone on the floor? A special micro- 
phone is used to pick up his voice. 

Toscha Seidel, the violinist, wears in the 
lapel of his coat a tiny watch, cleverly con- 
structed in the form of a button? 

Lorna Fantin, Old Gold character reader, is 
very pretty and is making hearts jump in the 
studios? 

WABC and WPG are regularly heard in 
England? 

Bradford Browne has just taken the first 
pictures of Bradford, Jr.? 

Columbia's fan-mail department announces 
that radio listeners wrote twice as many let- 
ters in 1930 as in 192 9? 

Louis A. Witten, Royal Hour announcer, 
was the first to broadcast a public event from 
the cockpit of an airplane? 

Audrey Marsh, nineteen-year-old Columbia 
soprano, played a leading role in "Abie's Irish 
Rose" for two years? 

Seventeen years ago Ted Husing was a mas- 
cot for the Columbia University athletic team? 

The violin you hear Emery Deutsch play- 
ing was willed to him by the famous gypsy 
Janci Breknavatchi? 

Guy Lombardo's ambition is to sleep nights 
instead of days? 

The theme song played by Ann Leaf has 
been called "Night" for want of a better title? 

Barbara Maurel, Columbia contralto, was 
born in Alsace-Lorraine? 

The Three Doctors ad lib all their sketches? 



Young Man (during radio audition) — And 
I can imitate any kind of a bird. 

Impatient Director — Can you do a homing 
pigeon? 



Milking cows on a farm in Alabama, Louis 
Dean wondered what he would be doing when 
he grew up. That was twenty years ago. To- 
day Dean is twenty-nine and is an announcer 
for the Columbia Broadcasting System. 

His home town is Valley Head, Ala. 
Schooled there, he worked on the farm until 
he went to Washington and Lee University. 
He enlisted in the Navy in 1918, left the 
Navy in 1920, and came to New York, where 
he held nine varied positions, until he finally 
found his forte in radio. 



m 



Art Gillham, "the whispering pianist" who 
long has been a feature of the air waves, has 
affixed his signature to a management contract 
with the Columbia Broadcasting System, over 
whose network he soon will be heard several 
times weekly. Back in 1922, at a Chicago 
station, Gillham made his entrance as a broad- 
caster, playing the accompaniments for studio 
singers. One day, in response to the familiar 
"dare," he embarked on his own as a vocalist. 
An immediate hit, he was engaged forthwith 
as a novelty singer. Since that occasion he 
has broadcast over more than three hundred 
stations throughout the United States and 
Canada, receiving the sobriquet of "the whis- 
pering pianist." His style is informal, and, 
whether he is talking or singing, his voice is 
never forced. 



IMPORTANT TO FRIENDS OF WTIC 
AND WBAL 

The following will probably be the April 
schedule for the NBC synchronization demon- 
stration: 
Sunday — 
10 a. M. to 7:45 p. M.; WBAL on 1060 K.; 

WTIC on 660 K. 
7:45 P. M. to midnight; WTIC on 1060 K.; 

WBAL on 760 K. 
Monday — 
8 a. M. to 4 p. M.; WBAL on 1060 K.; WTIC 

on 660 K. 
4 p. M. to midnight; WTIC on 1060 K.; 

WBAL on 760 K. 
Tuesday — 

7 A. M. to 4 p. M.; WTIC on 1060 K.; WBAL 

on 760 K. 
4 p. M. to midnight; WBAL on 1060 K.; 

WTIC on 660 K. 
Wednesday — 

8 A. M. to 4 p. m.; WBAL on 1060 K.; WTIC 

on 660 K. 
4 p. M. to midnight; WTIC on 1060 K.; 

WBAL on 760 K. 
Thu rsday — 

7 A. M. to 4 p. M.; WTIC on 1060 K.; WBAL 

on 760 K. 
4 p. m. to midnight; WBAL on 1060 K.; 

WTIC on 660 K. 
Friday — 

8 a. M. to 4 p. M.; WBAL on 1060 K.; WTIC 

on 660 K. 
4 p. M. to midnight; WTIC on 1060 K.; 

WBAL on 760 K. 
Saturday — 
7 a. m. to 4 p. m.; WTIC on 1060 K.; WBAL 

on 760 K. 
4 p. M. to midnight; WBAL on 1060 K.; 

WTIC on 660 K. 



« 



Columbia has prepared a new announcers' 
script test. All applicants must read it well 
and clearly before they even reach the first 
stages of announcerdom. 

During one of the announcers' auditions, 3 
studio attendant ushered in a candidate. After 
giving him the preliminary instructions, the 
attendant handed him the difficult script. 

The applicant, who might have passed for 
Bull Montana any day in the week, glanced 
through the first three paragraphs, swiftly 
turned about and walked out of the studio, 
saying: "O. K., Kid! . . . It's all right by me!" 








April, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 11 



IT is a new, highly amusing Henry-George half-hour that CBS is presenting each 
Tuesday evening these spring weeks. 

For one thing, the "Blackouts" are now being written by one of Broadway's 
favorite sons, Tom Tarrant, whose sketches in Earl Carroll's Vanities and in 
dozens of other New York productions have amused thousands. 

For another thing, the Henry-George cast has been reorganized to some extent. 
"Henry," for example, is now played by John Brewster; "George" is enacted by 
Teddy Bergman; "Flo" is portrayed by Georgia Backus, while "Pete" in real life 
is none other than Billy Scholtz. All musical interludes are provided by the 
Henry-George Cigar Band, directed by "Pete." 

Brewster, a New Yorker by birth, spent eight years on Broadway. He played 
leading roles in "The Plutocrat," the juvenile lead in "Lolly," "Everyman," "The 
Woman in Bronze" and others. He has played considerably in stock productions, 
as well as having been featured in several motion pictures. 

Aside from his role in the Henry-George "Blackouts," Brewster plays leading 
parts in a majority of the American School of the Air dramatic presentations. 

Teddy Bergman, whose role is "George," is also a New Yorker by birth. His 
first job in the show business was with the Ralph A. Rose Stock Company in 
Oklahoma City, which lasted one season. 

He played a number of varied roles in stock and other productions in New 
York City, and in 1929 made his radio debut in True Detective Mysteries. He 
has taken part in more than sixty radio productions which have been broadcast 
over large radio networks. 



Left to right: John Brewster as "Henry," Billy Scholtz as 
Backus as "Flo," Teddy Bergman as "George." 



'Pete," Georgia 




DX NOTES 

As the short-wave stations, for the most 
part, operate only at certain hours, it is essen- 
tial to know about when they will probably 
be on the air. That is why so many short- 
wave fans arc sending in for copies of the Feb- 
ruary issue, in which we gave time schedules 
of a number of short-wave stations, and also 
why we give this month some further time 
data for their benefit. 

In the following tabic all times are E. S. T.: 
England. 
G5SW, 25.53 meters; 7:30 to 8:30 a. m.; 2 

to 7 p. M., daily. 
G2NM, 20.95m.; Sundays, 1:30 to 3 P. M. 

Rumania. 

Bucharest, 21.5m.; Wednesday and Saturday 
afternoons. 

Holland. 

PCJ, Eindhoven, 31.28m.; Wednesday, 11 a. 
M. to 3 P. M.; Thursday, 1 to 3 and 6 to 
10 p. M.; Friday, I to 3 p. M.; Saturday, 
7 p. M. to 1 A. M. (Announces in five 
languages.) 



Germany. 

Berlin, 31.38m.; 8 A. M. to 7:30 p. M., daily. 
Berlin, 7.05m.; 11:30 A. M. to 1:30 p. M., 
Tuesday and Thursday. 

Austria. 

UOR2, Vienna, 49.4m.; 7 to 8 a. m., Tuesday 
and Thursday. 

Italy. 

13RO, Rome; 25.4m. and 80m.; every after- 
noon. 

Australia. 

VK3U2, Melbourne, 34m.; 3 to 5 A. M., Mon- 
day and Wednesday. 
VK2ME, Sydney, 31.28m.; early mornings. 

New Zealand. 

ZL3ZC, Christchurch, 50m.; 10:30 p. M. to 
12, Wednesday; 2:30 to 4 A. M., Saturday. 
Dutch East Indies. 

PLE, Bandoeng, 15.93m.; 8:40 to 10:40 a. m., 

Tuesday. 
India. 
VUS, Calcutta, 25.27m.; 8 to 10 a. m., daily. 




SlAM. 

HSlPJ, 16.9m.; 7:30 to 8:30 A. M., Saturday. 
HS2PJ, 29.5m.; 8 to 1 1 A. M., Tuesday, Fri- 
day, Saturday. 
Straits Settlements. 

VSIAB, Singapore, 40m.; 1 to 4 a. M., daily. 
Indo China. 

Saijon, 49m.; 1:30 to 2:30 a. M.„ Monday, 
Wednesday, Friday; 1:30 to 4 a. m., Tues- 
day, Thursday, Saturday. 

Many DXers are sending us in lists of sta- 
tions heard. We do not think we shall pub- 
lish these. Any information from one DXer 
which will aid another capture an elusive sta- 
tion, however, will be welcome. 

Try these out, short-wave fans, and, if you 
like them, we'll give you some more remote 
spots to fish for. 

BROADCAST BAND 

In addition to its regular broadcast periods 
(7 to 8:30 p. M., Wednesday, and 9:30 to 10 
P. M., Saturday), WKAQ at San Juan, Porto 
Rico (890 K.), has been broadcasting early 
Sunday morning test programs. 

During March, KGBU, Ketchikan, Alaska 



(900 K.), put on a test program every Thurs- 
day morning from 4 to 6 A. M. 

HIX at Santo Domingo (670 K.) fre- 
quently may be picked up just under WEAF 
as soon as that station signs off. 

A number of Cincinnati DXers, fishing for 
KFI at Los Angeles, have brought in instead 
XFG at Mexico City. 

Listeners in the early morning hours report 
hearing VAS, Glace Bay, Nova Scotia, giving 
weather reports, etc., to the fishing fleet. 

E. S. T. DXers, Try These Sunday Morn- 
ing Specials. — WKAQ at San Juan, Porto 
Rico (890 K.), broadcasts until 4 a. M. on 
Sundays; CMCQ, Havana (955 K.), and 
CMX, Havana (910 K.), until 3 a. m.; KOY, 
Phoenix, Ariz. (1390 K.), and the following 
West coast stations: KMTR, KTAB, KGER, 
KGB, KMCS, KOMO, KFWI, KOIN, KFVD, 
until 3 A. M., E. S. T. 

WSYB, Rutland. Vt., is on the air daily 
from noon until one, and from 6 to 9 p. M., 
E. S. T. 

KGMB, Honolulu, broadcasts on Monday to 
Friday from 10 a. M. to 9:30 P. M., and on 
Saturday from 10 p. M. to midnight, P. S. T. 



\\itt 





(^.(J^odirvolorv 



GILBERT GABLE, explorer, and group of Hopi Indians before the 
microphone in "Highroad of Adventure." SIR HUBERT WII.KINS 
broadcasts over a chain of Australian stations from Schenectady, N. Y. 
Two of the favorites of CKGW at Toronto arc M. B. BODINGTON, 
who is "Uncle Bod" to children wherever CKGW reaches, and GOR- 
DON HOGARTH, news and sports announcer. At eight o'clock each 
morning Maurice Bodington marshalls his "army of voices" and all 
Toronto starts the day with a laugh as the adventures of Major. 
Walpole and Jccvc the butler, and a dozen other characters, arc narrated. 




ordorvp 



Page 12 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



KedfoneJ Views and Kevfews, 



CHICAGO AREA 
By Joseph Ator 

THE acquisition of WENR at Chicago by 
the National Broadcasting Company, an- 
nounced recently, is a matter of importance 
to radio listeners for two reasons. One of 
them is immediate and local; the other, far- 
reaching and affecting, eventually, the whole 
fabric of network broadcasting. 

The immediate local effect is to give NBC 
an outlet in the country's second largest city, 
under its own control. True, the chain al- 
ready had four associated stations at Chicago 
in WGN, WIBO, KYW and WCFL. But the 
first three are either owned or tied closely to 
powerful newspapers, and the last is controlled 
by the labor people, all of which meant that, 
because of the volume of local programs, Chi- 
cago listeners were denied a number of the 
chain's best programs through lack of a sta- 
tion to handle them at the hour offered. 

WENR now takes those programs, although, 
in addition, it retains the local features which 
made it popular. The station owner, the 
Great Lakes Broadcasting Company, is con- 
trolled by the Insull utility interests. While 
the agreement with NBC was announced as a 
lease and operating agreement, it is understood 
that the chain will buy the station outright 
at the end of three years. 

So much for the local angle of the deal. 
Of still more significance is the fact that in 
WENR the National Broadcasting Company 
now has a powerful Midwestern station avail- 
able for the day when it finds it feasible to 
start synchronized broadcasting. 

Synchronization, in case you have not delved 
into the mechanical intricacies of radio, is the 
broadcasting of the same program by two or 
more stations, all operating on the same wave- 
length. That last is important. In a network 
program to-day, the same broadcast may be 
going out from twenty stations, but operat- 
ing nearly the same number of wavelengths. 

With the present overcrowding of radio 
channels, it is plain to see what a boon syn- 
chronization would be, in the way of cleared 
channels. Were it feasible in all its aspects, 
technical and commercial, it would be possible, 
for instance, for the chain to operate not two, 
but six or even a dozen networks. 

At present NBC is synchronizing programs 
from WEAF in New York, its key station, 
with WTIC in Hartford, Conn., and those 
from WJZ, New York, with WBAL, Balti- 
more. 

But this is more important. With the ac- 
quisition of WENR, the NBC now controls, 
through ownership or operating agreements, 
eight stations from coast to coast, all avail- 
able for a synchronized hook-up the moment 
that becomes desirable. 

The other stations are WEAF and WJZ in 
New York; WHAM in Rochester; WTAM in 
Cleveland; KOA, Denver; KGO, San Fran- 
cisco, and WRC, Washington. In addition, 
the General Electric Company, one of the 
three corporations which own NBC, has WGY 
at Schenectady, and the Westinghouse Electric 
and Manufacturing Company, another of the 
owner corporations, has four others — KWY, 
Chicago; KDKA, Pittsburgh, and WBZ and 
WBZA, at Springfield and Boston. 



A month ago the National Broadcasting 
Company made the formal announcement that 
thereafter it would stage more than fifty of 
its programs, previously created in New York, 
from its new Chicago headquarters and studios. 

The programs are all on the Blue network, 
of which WJZ in New York has been the 
key station. Chicago, rapidly fulfilling the 
prediction of President Aylesworth that it was 
destined to be the radio center of the country, 
is how the point of origin for more than two 
hundred NBC programs. 

Now, if your memory is good, you will 
recollect that the transfer of a majority of the 
Blue network activities from New York to 
Chicago was predicted by What's on Tin; 
Am 'way last December. 



.President Hoover, who is reported to have 
cherished a secret desire to throw things 
at Senators for some time, will have his wish 
gratified in a small way this month. It 
is almost as much a tradition that the Presi- 



dent should take uncertain aim and toss the 
first ball when the Senators open the big- 
league ball season in Washington as it is that 
he should issue a Thanksgiving proclamation. 

In addition, the present occupant of the 
White House is a real baseball fan. However, 
he would probably put a little more steam on 
the ball were some of his critics in the Upper 
House on the receiving end, rather than Wal- 
ter Johnson's hustling young fellows. 

The NBC will divide its efforts on chain 
broadcasts of the opening games on April 14. 
Western fans, most of whom were pulling for 
either the Cubs or the Cardinals last season, 
will be offered a National League opener. In 
the East, Connie Mack's champion Athletics 
will be the opening-day attraction. 

Columbia is undecided, at this writing, on 
the question of a chain broadcast. Its stations 
will handle the local games in their cities, 
however. 

Opening-day past, Chicago baseball fans 
will, as in past years, get the best radio base- 
ball coverage in the country. WGN, WMAQ 
and WCFL have indicated that they will re- 
sume their daily broadcasts of the Cubs and 
White Sox, whichever team plays at home. 
WBBM follows the Cubs exclusively, with Pat 
Flanagan, a pioneer and past master at that 
,art, interpreting telegraphic reports when the 
team plays on the road. 

KMOX and KWK broadcast the Cardinals' 
games at St. Louis. Phil Ball, owner of the 
Browns, is "agin" broadcasting. WTAM is 
reported this year to have obtained the ex- 
clusive privilege of broadcasting the Cleveland 
Indians' games. WJR, Detroit, follows the 
Tigers. 

WNAC and WEAN — the latter at Provi- 



dence, R.I. — make public the shame of Bos- 
ton's lowly entries. WLW at Cincinnati 
broadcasts some of the Reds' home games, and 
WCAU at Philadelphia has made tri-weekly 
broadcasts of the Phillies' games in the past. 
The Athletics bar broadcasting except on their 
opening-day. Both New York teams and the 
Pittsburgh Pirates are also against broadcast- 
ing, fearing that it hurts their gate receipts. 



Pat Flanagan, of WBBM, should receive a 
vote of thanks from Chicago mothers for the 
stocking-darning he saved them, if a recent 
series of programs which he announced had 
the desired effect. Pat gave the younger gen- 
eration a three weeks' course in roller-skating 
technique over the air. 



Track fans will get the best broadcasts of 
the year on April 17, when the Drake relays 
are scheduled at Des Moines and the classic 
Penn races at Philadelphia. Both are chain 
broadcasting possibilities, but announcements 
of a definite nature are not available at press- 
time. 



N. Y. C. NEWS 

By Chas. S. Strong 

WHAT'S in a name? Everything should be 
clean coming through WASH in Grand 
Rapids. It is all clear sailing to WALK in 
Willow Grove, Pa. "WBAA" is not the an- 
swer usually given the Lafayette station's pro- 



Ramblin' Roun' Radiolan' 

With the Red-headed Music Maker 



HOT SPRINGS NATIONAL PARK, 
Arkansas, March 25th, 1931 — Hello, 
Folks! How are you all this evenin'? Yes, 
Suh! Down here soakin' up the sunshine and 
the radio waters just 'cause old man Flu 
caught up with me again this year. Got ac- 
quainted with him in the service in France in 
1918, and he's been followin' me around ever 
since. Well, anyway, since arrivin' here I've 
quit sayin', "I's a whole lot worser 'n' I is 
better." You know, at home on the first of 
the month I'm always in hot water. Came 
down here to get away from it and been in 
hot water ever since. Goin' out to-morrow 
and miss eighteen holes in one — there's one 
consolation, tho', I'm missin' closer every day. 
My close pals tell me I've got it all over Bobby 
Jones at spankin' a Uke. Just can't seem to 
get away from radio — the mineral waters 
are radio active, and even at golf you're with- 
in shoutin' distance of the microphones ■ — 
the massive KTHS towers are right alongside 
the first tee out at the Hot Springs Golf 
Club. Came down here for a little rest and 
recreation, but like the mailman who takes a 
walk on his vacation, and the sailor who takes 
a little rowboat ride on his, here's one radio 
man that did a little serious broadcastin' on 
my vacation. With thanks to our mighty 
good mutual friend and regular fellow Camp- 
bell Arnoux, director-manager, chief cook and 
bottle-washer of Kum To Hot Springs, "The 
Red-headed Music Maker" put on a little im- 
promptu get-together last month just for old 
times' sake. We labeled it an Endurance Con- 
test. Started at eleven p. m. and kept goin' 
till after midnight just fiddlin' 'round for my 
own amazement — my little 3 -piece Orch. 
(my chair, my uke 'n' me). Beg pardon — 
correction — Took a long horseback ride day 
before, so had to work standin' up, therefore 
couldn't use my 3-piece Orch., and standin' 
up that long was where the endurance came 
in. Anyway, we had a lot of fun and a regu- 
lar old-fashioned show, just foolin' 'round, 
singin' a bit, ch.ittin' chummy-like just for 
no reason at all, and gettin' telegrams from 
all over the country. Takin' your time, put- 
tin' all you got into a number, instead of 
iacin' the clock to get thro' ex.ictlv on the 
second. That kind o' fiddle-foolin' is fun, 
and the telegrams we got showed yon folks 
joined right in and had as much fun as we 
did. 

With the modern radio artist to-d.i\ — 



it's all work, and you know "all work and no 
play makes Jack a dull boy." Let's start a 
movement for more extemporaneous, im- 
promptu programs. Do I hear a motion? 
Had a bet up with Arnoux, whom I've known 
most happily thro' a good many radio years, 
that there would be just as much radio inter- 
est to-day in an Endurance Contest of this 
kind as there was in the early days. Ap- 
peared first for Campbell Arnoux and KTHS 
on my original Eveready Tour back in 1925 
— ■ then came back for another appearance in 
1929, just before going with Majestic. In our 
'2 9 Endurance Contest we heard from every 
State in the Union except three — my bet 
this time was that we'd hear from every State! 
How are you bettin'? 

Just heard that a duck in Chicago wrote 
a new Spring Song — "Oh, April Showers 
Come What May, or June, dear, don't July 
to me" — Pat Barnes, for years one of the 
greatest showmen in radio, has a very fast line 

— it's got to be fast now, for he's slingin' it 
for Swift & Co., over WGN. Richie Craig, 
Jr., in Blue Malt's "Jest for Fun," brings 
pioneer Jack Nelson to the front with him 
over Columbia — Jack's radio experience 
should help this stage personality. There's a 
kick in it! — Clara, Lu 'n' Em, three radio 
newcomers, graduated from WGN and are 
now sellin' soap over NBC. Gals will be gals! 

— The Boswell Sisters from the Coast bowled 
lil old New York over like she never got 
bowled on Camel Hour. Boy! what a gal 
trio! — Helen Kane, who rode to fame on a 
"boop-boop-a-doop," insists the correct spell- 
ing of her trick phrase should be "poop-poop- 
a-doop." Oh, well, what's a couple o' boops 
between friends! — The guy I'd like to lo- 
cate is the bird who found the "Ga-Ga" in all 
agog) or the professor who revived back- 
gammon — Ed McConnell, at WLW. folks 
tell me, sounds a bit like "little I'm" on the 
air — shucks, that ain't nuthin' — a hombre 
registers in at the Arlington to-day with my 
name — it was Wendell V. Hall, of Fisher 
Bodies in Detroit. When they page us in the 
lobby, I say, "Aw, blaaaa ■ — I'm too tired — 
let the other guy get up." Well, I gotta ram- 
hlc;. got places to go and things to do in this 
glorious land of sunshine — but I'll be seein' 
you, so be aroun'! So until then see you 
pretty soon, pretty soooon, pretty soooooon — 
nite owl. Sincerely, 

WKNnrn Hall. 



grams. WEAN, at Providence, R. I., thinks 
itself quite grown-up, and WEAR, at Cleve- 
land, doesn't mean a thing, even if it does 
have a feminine sound. WEW might be a 
sign of relief after clearing a "tight" place, 
but it broadcasts from St. Louis, Mo., which 
is no "tight" place. 

WHAM, in Rochester, N. Y., hits a good 
batting average. The station at Omaha, Neb., 
is a WOW. Fort Wayne, Ind., liked Omaha ? i 
choice, but they stuttered and brought forth 
WOWO. A KICK comes from Red Oak, la. 
KOB is all there is for you at State College, 
N. M., but that's all right. Council Bluffs has 
us in its KOIL, and as for KOIN, at Sylvan, 
Ore. — oh, what's in a name? 



Radio fans who got a big thrill out of Writ- 
ing to their favorite stars and having an auto- 
graphed picture of their "ideal" sent by a 
bored secretary have now gone one better. 
This has been developed by the organization of 
almost a score of "Fan Clubs" in and about 
the Eastern big cities. Your chronicler has the 
"dope" on five of these; namely, the "Bert 
Lowndes Club," the "Guy Lombardo Club," 
the "J. Fred Cootes Club," the "Rudy Vallee 
Club" and the "Uncle Nick Kenny Club." 
The clubs number about 2 50 members each, 
and hold regular meetings each four or six 
weeks, with a luncheon and impromptu enter- 
tainment. The club's namesake is present in 
person and a good time is had by all. 



Now that WMCA and WPCH, New York, 
are playing with that television apparatus and 
are opening the "Television Theatre," Nalda 
Nardi, the enterprising program director of 
the stations, will have to give her artists screen 
tests as well as auditions. 



Walter Dreher, well-known linguist and 
member of the cast of "Once Upon a Time," 
who appears occasionally over WPCH, New 
York, with the John O. Hewitt Players, says 
that foreign languages have been the key to 
his success on the radio and the stage. Walter 
speaks four languages — Spanish, English, Ger- 
man and French. 



Professor La Vergne, instructor of French 
at the Y. M. C. A. at Twenty-third Street, 
New York, receives a rousing recognition over 
WPCH with his "Traveler's French" on Sat- 
urday mornings at 11:15 o'clock. Professor La 
Vergne offers to improve your French from 
the "putt-putt of a two-cylinder engine to the 
patois of Paris." 

Standing outside of the studio, listening to 
a broadcast of "Romeo and Juliet," I was sur- 
prised at the number of people that seemed to 
have been jammed into the room at WGBS, 
New York. There were Italians, Spaniards, 
Chinese, Viennese, Venetian dukes, Roman 
knights and all the rest. Invited to enter, I at 
first reneged because of the crowded condition 
of the room, only to be informed that it was 
Don Trent giving the entire presentation and 
taking twenty-three distinct parts. Don is on 
every Thursday at 4 P. M. 



An interested audience is expressing its en- 
joyment with the offerings of WQAO, the 
Calvary Baptist Church's station in New York. 
The broadcasts on Sundays from 11 A. M. to 
12:30 p. M., Sunday evenings from 7:30 to 
9:30, and the Wednesday services from 7:30 
to 8:30 r. M., attract a wealth of fan mail. 



Old Bill Mullaney, the control operator , at 
WGBS, New York, had a new experience in 
broadcasting a remote from a restaurant in 
New York the other evening. Bill was quite- 
surprised to hear the Morse Code comihg over 
his telephone equipment, but finally discovered 
that the telephone transmitter had gone 
"blooey" at the restaurant, and "Boy Scout" 
Jack Reid was doing his good turn with the 
old International. It worked. 



"Tony" Stanford has left WGBS to join the 
production staff of the National Broadcasting 

Company. 



March, 193 1 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page T3 





<$> 



Some of the WLAC (Nashville) 
staff artists who participated in the 
Fourth Anniversary Program re- 
cently broadcast over the CBS net- 
work. In the foreground are the 
WLAC announcers: F. C. Sowell, 
Herman Gizzard, Tim Sanders and 
William Perry. 



TREMLETTE TULLY is direc- 
tor of woman's activities, DUANE 
SNODGRASS is associate announcer 
and assistant musical director, and 
CLIFF ADAMS is chief announcer 
at the Gruen station, 
VKRC, Cincinnati. 
The distinctive feature 
of this station, worthy 
of a nation-wide audi- 
ence, are the "GRUEN 
GUILDSMEN" pro- 
grams nightly except 
Sunday, at 11 o'clock. 
A group of Cincinnati's ablest musicians participate, accompanied by the famous Music 
Hall pipe-organ. This program is personally arranged and announced by Station Director 
Eugene Mittendorf. 



Benton, 



Uevmpbell 




Popular WAPI at Birmingham is here represented by its Concert Orchestra: SAM 
BENTON, commercial director and announcer; CARROLL GARDNER, announcer, and 
WALTER N. CAMPBELL, manager. 



cjim, and wl< 




Folks, meet up with I1KRR 
LOUIE and the WEASEL (one of 
Hcrr Louie's four umpah-umpah 
boys). The Weasel is warming up 
his clarinet, much to the discom- 
fori of Hcrr Louie, the "Lettlc Ger- 
man Band" director of Station 
WGN, Chicago. Herr Louie and 
his company arc not only heard on 
the air each week-day night from 
10:20 to 10:30, but on the stage .is 
well. The director of the band is 
Henry E. Mocller, thirty-six years 
old; it is he who writes all the fool- 
ishness which he unrolls with his 
pert little clarinet player, the Weasel 
(Harold J. Gilles, thirty-five). 



FRANK McINERNY .m,\ I RI I) 
LUNDBERG, in their roles of 
"Tim" and "Olc," stand for mirth 
and jollity at WCCO, Minneapolis, 
and WDAY, Fargo. By vocation, 
Timothy Murphy and Olc Gundcr- 
son arc courthouse janitors; by avo- 
cation, radio philosophers on all 
things pertaining to the political life 
of the Northwest. 




Page 14 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 193 1 




^fi-$oJr&^- 




^=%F 



I have never written you before to tell you 
what a little wonder your magazine was. 
What I did was tell all my friends about the 
magazine when I discovered it at our news- 
stand back in January, 1930. Eight of our 
neighbors have radios. They all buy a copy 
of What's on the Air. As Amos 'n' Andy 
would say, "Ain't that sumpin'?" 

Yesterday, when we hurried seven miles 
through the snow to get the March number 
(you see, we can't do without the little, old 
mag, now that we are accustomed to it), my- 
self and eight of the listening neighbors 
groaned and sighed in disappointment; pished, 
tushed and phooeyed in disgust when the news- 
dealer handed us that oversized magazine, 
which, for some unknown reason, reminded 
me of the side of a barn. 

It is plain to be seen that you are trying to 
please the public. Maybe if you would only 
print the programs like you used to, with the 
red and black figures, a fellow might, within 
the course of a year or two, get used to the 
size of the magazine. L. I. 

Cape Vincent, N. Y. 

Um-huh! Dat sho am sumpin'! 



I have just bought the March issue of the 
What's on the Air and I think that you 
should be commended for the great many im- 
provements in that issue. It is 50 per cent, 
more efficient than the early issues. 

Most of the radio listeners have a craze for 
one kind of a program. For example, some 
people are crazy over minstrel programs. At 
this time there are few minstrel programs on 
the chains. In other words, the listener has a 
hard time finding such programs. Some other 
programs of this nature are: German band, 
South Sea music, old fiddlers, cowboy songs 
and comical programs. 

Now, I would suggest that all such pro- 
grams be listed under the heading "Minstrels." 

Another suggestion is that the editor give 
the answers with the letters listed in "Fan 
Fare." 

I hope that you will consider these sugges- 
tions because they come from an average radio 
listener. The purpose of a magazine should be 
to serve the average person. C. F. D. 

Watkins Glen, N. Y. 

The term "minstrel" conjures up in 
the modern mind a black-face musical 
comedy, which complexion would not 
become the German band, South Sea 
music, etc. 



One of my favorites, Lou Van (who has 
been playing the Clarovox for CFCF, in Mon- 
treal), has broken in on vaudeville. You will 
want to wish him the best of luck, as it was 
through him I became acquainted with the 
fine radio magazine, What's on the Air. 

Valois, Quebec. C. M. A. 

We have rubbed our rabbit's foot 
for you, Lou. 

May I have enough space in your valuable 
magazine to register a vigorous complaint 
against this so-called "electrical transcription" 
mania which has hit most of the radio stations? 

To my mind the manufacturers of radio 
receiving sets should be vitally interested in 
this matter, for do you believe people will 
continue to buy receiving sets to listen to a 
lot of phonograph records? If the sponsors of 
these phonograph-record programs insist on re- 
corded programs, let them peddle them from 
house to house for people to play on their 
talking-machines, but, for the good of the ra- 
dio industry, keep them off the air. 

Tl^e advance that radio has made in the past 
ten years is one of the marvels of our century, 
but it is like taking a step backward with 
seven-league boots to have radio programs 
made up of phonograph records. The tonal 
quality of these recorded programs should be 
sufficient to keep them off the air. Not only 
that, but you tune in to the same program 
from several different stations on the same 
night, and most any night it will be picked up 
from at least two stations. 



Every one connected with radio, be he man- 
ufacturer, broadcaster or only a fan, knows 
that the available air channels are being con- 
stantly demanded by more stations than can 
be allowed. I believe the Federal Radio Com- 
mission should put these stations off the air 
that use these so-called "electrical transcrip- 
tions," and let stations come on the air who 
would be glad to furnish us with flesh-and- 
blood talent, and not feed us "canned" music 
six nights a week. 

Our family and many of the fans in this 
city will not listen to this "canned" music, 
and I do not believe we are alone in this mat- 
ter; so let some more of the fans speak up 
before all we have is "electrical transcriptions." 

Bay City, Mich. R. J. D. 

The "Pied Piper" robot, "canned" 
music, does not beguile this "child." 



has a little power in it. Thanks. 

Nakoma, Madison, Wis. 

Who wants to laugh? 



P. C 



I wish to thank you for the interesting 
articles in this magazine. I for one do not 
agree with "Wanna Laugh" or "A Subscriber, 
Nyack, N. Y." 

I have nothing but praise for Lowell 
Thomas, Floyd Gibbons and the others who 
help to bring music and other entertaining 
programs over the radio. 

Tell "Wanna Laugh," and others like her, to 
listen to herself sometimes and see if she never 
makes mistakes in pronunciation herself. 

Guilford, Conn. G. M. B. 

Dozen Wanna Laugh. 



We are in receipt of your attractive March 
issue, and congratulate you on the new appear- 
ance of your very useful publication. 

It is a slight disappointment that you failed 
to note Jackson on your radio map on the back 
cover. 

We have a full-time one-kilowatt station in 
WJDX, and an associate of the National Broad- 
casting Company, and we hope very much that 
you will not overlook us in your future issues. 

Jackson, Miss. W. P. H. 

We regret this deficiency in our ra- 
dio map, more particularly as it can 
not be immediately remedied. The 
plate for this map was made, however, 
over a year ago, before Jackson, Miss., 
boasted a broadcasting station; hence 
its absence on this map, which we shall 
hope to improve in the future. 



I want to say that your magazine is the 
best of its kind that I have been able to get, 
but I want to lodge a friendly complaint. 

In your February issue you gave space to a 
"would be" funny scribe who 
signed his name "Wanna 
Laugh." This man ridiculed 
one of the most entertaining, 
polished and genteel gentlemen 
that speaks to the radio audi- 
ence, Mr. Lowell Thomas. Such 
spleen should be passed unno- 
ticed, and, if he or his like 



>^% 




I have received a letter from a man in New 
Zealand who was mentioned in this magazine 
in one of the previous issues — the article relat- 
ing to the "DX," or distance, records he has 
made. Since that article was printed, he has 
made many more records that only a few can 
approach. 

For instance, he was the first listener in 
Christchurch, New Zealand, to pick up radio 
station WMAQ, in Chicago; he is one of the 
two Christchurch listeners to pick up station 
KWKH, in Shreveport, La.; he was the first 
New Zealand listener to hear 
RFM, in Siberia. He also has 
quoted letters to me that look 
as if he were the first New 
Zealand listener to hear sta- 
tions KWK, KFOX, KFON 
and at least five more Ameri- 
can stations. Many broadcast- 
ing stations he has heard have 




should write again, I think his 
letters should go the waste- 
basket route. Mr. Lowell 
Thomas has been farther 
around a cup hunting for the 
handle than Mr. "Wanna 
Laugh" has been away from 
home. 

We of the South — and, for 
that matter, I believe all other sections — look 
forward with pleasure for the hour to come 
when we can hear Mr. Thomas give his all too 
short talk about current events. S. M. L. 

Texarkana, Ark. -Tex. 

Now, Wanna Laugh? 



"Fan Fare" is a very interesting department, 
only I'd like to know who Mr. "Wanna 
Laugh" is. I mean the one who seems to have 
it in for Lowell Thomas. Mr. Thomas con- 
ducts his period in the most interesting way 
possible. 

And one more thing. Please use your in- 
fluence toward getting "Station KUKU," which 
is owned and operated by Raymond Knight, 
put on some station in the middle West tint 



complimented him on his cor- 
rect reports of their programs. 
This man is Mr. W. G. 
Sturgess, 311 Canal Re- 
serve, Christchurch, New Zea- 
land. 

Mr. Sturgess operates a four- 
tube Pilot - Super - Wasp re- 
ceiver, on which he has made 
many records. He has letters of verification 
from forty-three American stations on the 
broadcast band; also from W2XAF, W2XAD, 
KDKA, W6XN, CJRM, WLW (on both 
bands), W9XF, 5SW and GBX (England), 
PCJJ (Holland), RFM (Siberia), SFR (Paris), 
DHC (Berlin), ANF. (Java), 2ME (Austra- 
lia), 6AG (Perth, Western Australia), and a 
few Australian amateurs. R. R. 

Mineral Pt., Wis. 

Thanx a lot, R. R.! 



For the past three months Tony Cabooch 
has been on the air daily in the interest of the 
St. Louis Star's Clothing Relief Stations. On 
a three-ton truck he makes daily trips 
throughout St. Louis, gathering clothing for 



the poor. He has also started a drive on the 
air to place radios in the Blind Institutions 
throughout America. A. F. R. 

St. Louis, Mo. 

Ah weahs numbah thuhteens, Mis- 
tah Tony. 



Your magazine title should have one addi- 
tion. It should have a great, big question 
mark after "Air." You evidently thought 
your early issues so darn good that the stations 
would never have the heart to change their 
programs. Please get in touch with the chains 
for next month, as I will throw away once 
more three jits. But, unless there is a change 
— good night! I am a crossword-puzzle fan, 
but your late issues are unsolvable. Sorry to 
bother you, but thought perhaps you had not 
discovered the many errors. Trusting you 
may improve, or at least fade out, or take an 
Aspirin and jump in the Ohio River! 

Savannah, Ga. J. H. S. 

A hard blow, but (for any who 
might be interested) WOTA recov- 
ered on the seventh count. 



Thought you would be interested in the en- 
closed newspaper clipping: 

"Tolleston Club to Discuss Radio 

" 'The Radio' will be the subject for to- 
morrow's program of the Tolleston Commu- 
nity Service Club to be held in the Tolleston 
public library, beginning at two o'clock. 'Your 
Favorite Radio Artist' will be the title of the 
roll-call. Mrs. W. R. Brown will present a 
paper on 'The Radio as a Means of Entertain- 
ment and Education,' and Mrs. J. McCon- 
nachie will have as her subject a radio maga- 
zine, What's on the Air. The president, 
Mrs. A. M. Wheeler, will preside at the busi- 
ness session preceding the program." 

Gary, Ind. H. W. W. 

There's an up-to-the-minute Wom- 
an's Club for you! 



Why, oh, why, don't you print anything 
about Cleveland talent, especially all the fine 
entertainers at WTAM? 

You have many readers here in Cleveland 
and I'll bet they all feel as I do, that we are 
neglected. 

A sincere plugger for What's on the Air. 

Sally. 

Thanx for the stepchildren, Sally. 



In your February number there is an article 
to the effect that the chains were considering 
broadcasting important hockey matches, prob- 
ably those for the Stanley Cup, but they had 
decided it would require a super-announcer to 
keep up with the play, etc. Bill Spargo, who 
muttered over the mike from the Boston 
Arena through Station WBZ before they 
spoiled things there by broadcasting a sym- 
phony orchestra (with which the air is over- 
loaded) during the period set aside for hockey, 
could do this and make them like it. Also 
Jack Fellman, who does the Madison Square 
Gardens games through WOR, is no slouch. 

Hamilton Cove, Quebec. R. N. P. 

Which is a word to the wise. 



I note with satisfaction that the chains art 
considering the broadcast of the Stanley Cup 
Hockey series. Right they are, too, in de- 
ciding that a super-announcer is required. 
The man they need is "Cyclone" Edwards. 
Three years ago he was hockey announcer 
for WLS, Chicago. Born and bred in Canada, 
he knows his hockey and is possessed of a line 
as long as from now till next Christmas. He 
is the one man I know of, in radio or out of 
it, who can adequately keep up with the game 
and make it interesting to those a bit hazy a;, 
to the rules and regulations of the game. 

Winnipeg, Canada. I. J. 

Just another word. 



April, 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 15 




^PemACst 



Each month hundreds of letters come in from 
our readers requesting pictures of favorite art- 
ists. On this page we shall reply by using pic- 
tures for which most calls have been received 
(except that we shall not present the same art- 
ist in successive issues). 



** 





— Courtesy Mush 
Corporation of 
America. 



VAUGHN DE LEATH, contralto crooner, only last month returned 
to New York City and to the NBC studios after fulfilling a twenty-six- 
week contract with WTAM, Cleveland. MARY HOPPLE, contralto solo- 
ist, is heard each Sunday evening at eight o'clock, E. S. T., on Enna 
Jcttick Melodies, and on Friday nights at ten with the Armstrong Quakers. 
The King Edward Orchestra (Toronto), led by the eminent I.UIGI 
ROMANELLI, is heard on two networks: on Friday nights from 11:30 
to 12, over CBS, and again on Sunday nights through an all-Canadian 
chain, headed by Station CFRB. Here arc the four LOMBARDO brothers, 
left to right, GUY, CARMEN, LEBERT and VICTOR, members of the 
Robert Burns Panatcla Orchestra, heard Mondays at 10 i>. m., E. S. T., 
over CBS. For ten years VINCENT SOREY has beguiled radio audiences 
who listen in on CBS, leading his orchestra and playing the violin with 
masterly style. HARRY SALTER, orchestra leader heard over CBS, was 
made musical director of WABC when Grebe owned it. And here's 
"LITTLE JACK LITTLE," NBC's popular pianist and longiter, KELVIN 
KEECH is not only one of the best known of NBC's announcers, but he 
is also one of the most popular in the studios. Devotees of the dance 
welcome the familiar strains of JOHNNY HAMP's orchestra that come 
to them at present over WLW, Cincinnati. ANN LEAF has gained a 
multitude of admirers by reason of her organ broadcasts over the Columbia 
chain. 




Page 16 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



"IV TBC has announced its pro- 



gram tentatively for 
Easter Sunday, April 5. The 
opening program will be at 
7:30 a.m. (E. S. T.), when the 
sunrise services at the Walter 
Reed Hospital in Washington, 
D. C, conducted by U. S. Army chaplains, will go 
on the air over WEAF and associates. 

At 8 A. M. the program will move to San Fran- 
cisco. Here there will be organ music, anthems by 
the combined choirs of San Francisco churches, and 
a symphony orchestra. Then the listeners will be 
taken to Mount Davidson to share in the annual 
sunrise Easter service there. 

The special symphony from the Roxy Theatre, 
the National Oratorio Society program and The 
Pilgrims will all devote themselves to Easter music. 
At 5 p. M. the Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, 
directed by Leopold Stokowski, will play, including 
seasonal music in their program. 

At 7:30 p. m. Lily Pons, premiere Metropolitan 
Opera soprano, will make her radio debut. At 9:15 
John Charles Thomas, baritone, will be the Atwater 
Kent guest artist. 

Sunday, April 5, will be a notable day for lovers 
of good music. 

Si 

Raymond Knight, station master of "KUKU," 
is winning new laurels as master of ceremonies at 
the Clicquot "Night Club of the Arctic." 

Lee Morse, "blues" singer, has signed a CBS con- 
tract and will work exclusively for that system. 



Don McNeill and Van Fleming, the Two Pro- 
fessors of WHAS fame, have been signed by the 
Quaker Oats Company to broadcast each morning 
between 7:45 and 8 o'clock (P. S. T.) over NBC 
Pacific Coast stations. 

Si 

The Van Heusen program returned to the air 
waves as a CBS Friday night feature, beginning 
March 20, with an entirely new array of talent. 



The Oxol Boys — Gordon Graham, Dave Grant 
and Bunny Coughlin — may be heard at 10 a. m. 
Tuesdays and Fridays, and at 1:15 P. M. Sundays, 
over CBS. 

% 

"Radio Round-up," a new CBS sustaining fea- 
ture, scheduled at present at 11:30 p. m. Thurs- 
days, forms a true variety program. Each week 
some half-dozen CBS artists participate. 



^cP^olfawA^oaioceTwewTs 



On April 26, Daylight Sav- 
ing Time returns to upset ra- 
dio schedules. Beginning 
that day those readers in 
communities where Standard 
Time continues will have to 
subtract one hour from all 
times given in this issue. 



NBC has completed an agreement with WLS, 
Chicago, which shares use of the 870 channel with 
WENR, whereby WLS will confine its individual 
broadcasts to morning and afternoon hours, except 
on Saturdays. As a result, except on Saturday 
night, the evening programs over this channel will 
all be arranged by NBC. Meanwhile this contem- 
plated arrangement, as well as the taking over of 
WENR as a key chain station, has played hob with 
the program schedules of Chicago stations. 

WENR will continue to broadcast the Weener 
Minstrels each Wednesday at 9 p. m., C. S. T. How- 
ever, the beloved "Smith Family" will be heard 
hereafter from KYW. As we go to press the time 
is not available. 

% 

International Broadcasts 
(CBS, Sundays at 12:30 p. m.) 

April 5 — Easter sermon by a high ecclesiastic of 
the Church of England. 

April 12 — "Rejuvenation," address by Serge 
Voronoff, celebrated scientist, speaking from Paris. 

April 19 — The Lord Mayor of London and His 
Boy Players and Singers. 

April 26 — Address on Daniel Defoe. 

May 3 — "Wales" (first of an International 
Travel Series), by Miss Megan Lloyd George, M.P. 

% 

Coming Empire Builders Programs 

Apr. 6, 1931, Monday, 10:30, E. S. T — "Shoes 
of Eloquence," replete with the atmosphere of San 
Francisco's Chinatown, is the story which the Old 
Timer tells on the Empire Builder dramatic half- 
hour Monday night. 

The cast, besides Harvey Hays as the Old Timer, 
will include Miss Lucille Husting as Ann Temple, 
and Don Ameche as Joe Cortez. The musical set- 
ting, which will include a Chinese orchestra, was 
arranged by Josef Koestner, musical director of the 
Empire Builders productions. 

Apr. 13. — "Mushy of Hell's Gate Mine," a 
melodrama with its locale in a California mining 
camp, will be presented by Empire Builders Monday 
night. 

The hero of the story is a motherless boy who 
clears his father's name and whose longing for a 
mother is finally fulfilled. 

April 20. — A cowboy comedy-drama. Although 



the story concerns Jack Brown, who, as a stage- 
driver in the Montana's early days, often "shot it 
out" with bandits, the playlet concerns itself prin- 
cipally with the "soft" side of the happy-go-lucky 
riders of the plains. 

What a trio of range riders started out to do to 
a homesteader who had settled down at their water- 
ing-place, and what they did, were quite different 
things. 

The story was written by Virginia Gardiner, 
who obtained the facts from Jack Brown himself, 
now a veteran guide at Glacier National Park. 

April 27. — Louis Riel's rebellion against the 
Canadian Government, and the part played in it by 
James J. Hill at the behest of his Canadian friends, 
is the basis of this Empire Builders playlet. 

May 4. — What is unquestionably one of the 
most spectacular dramatic productions ever pre- 
sented on the radio will be offered by Empire Build- 
ers when it presents the "Legend of the Wild Rose." 
The story recounts the dramatic incidents which 
explain, according to the Indian legend, how roses 
came by their thorns. Unusual sound effects and a 
lavish musical setting were required, as well as act- 
ing of the finest technique, and more than fifty 
hours of rehearsals have been required to prepare 
this production for its half-hour on the air. 



WDAY at Fargo, and KFYR at Bismarck, N. 
D., have joined the NBC network. Because of the 
change in WDAY's program plans which will nec- 
essarily result, we have omitted its listings from our 
schedule pages for this issue only. 



"The March of Time," heard over CBS at 10:30 
p. M., Fridays, is one of the most expensive produc- 
tions now on the air. In addition to a large cast of 
actors, it employs a symphony orchestra and a spe- 
cial sound-effects corps. 

Irene Bordooni, who hitherto has confined her 
radio activities to guest appearances, has signed a 
long-term contract to portray the title role of "The 
Coty Playgirl" in a series of broadcasts over the 
Columbia network on Sundays at 9 p. M„ E. S. T. 
The feature is sponsored by Coty, which, with the 
exception of a one-time broadcast last year, is pre- 
senting its first radio program. 



A service of What's on 
the Air covers the hours 
from 4 p. m. to 1 a. m., 
E. S. T., or 3 to midnight, 
C. S. T., for every day in 
April. It is so simple as 
scarcely to need explanation. 



GUIDE TO PROGRAM SERVICE 

Hozid to Find the Program You Wont When You 



(pp. 18-31) 

Want It 



TO MAKE A LONG- 
DISTANCE TEST (DX) 



There is but one thing to 



remember — programs pri cum i> by eigures or letters 
in squares are nbc programs; programs preceded by 
figures in circles or black letters a to k are 
Columbia programs; mi other symbols reeer to 
1 0( \1 programs. 

Suppose, Sunday, April 5, about 3 o'clock, a new reader 
at Pes Moines desired to select a program. He might best 
turn to pages 18 and 19, at the inner side of which the 
programs for April 5 are listed, and read over what is 
offered at 3 P. M., C S. T. He would find [l] Dr. Cad- 
man, [3l Williams' Oilomatics and (1) New York Phil- 
harmonic. Referring to the station list and watching the 



3 o'clock channel, at Iowa stations he would find chat 
Council Muffs was carrying (1) the New York Philhar- 
monic, is were Waterloo and Sioux City, and that Des 
Moines was offering [l] Dr. Cadman. To get h| Wil- 
liams' Oilomatics, however, he would have to go further 
afield. A quick glance up and down the 3 o'clock channel 
reveals that WREN, at Lawrence, Kan., is probably the 
nearest station carrying [3]; but WGN, at Chicago, also 
carries it, and WGN happens to have a clear channel and 
may be easier to get. At any rate, our new Des Moines 
reader is able, in a few seconds, to choose and find the most 
promising program. 



Ascertain which of your 
local stations are broadcast- 
ing chain features at the 
moment. Tune in one of 
these and hnd out what number is being rendered. Then start 
your detector dial at either end of its arc and turn slowly. 
As soon as you hear the same number, note your dial setting 
and check back to the column showing wavelength (on 
page 54), thus ascertaining the approximate wavelength 
of the station you arc receiving. To the left of this col- 
umn you will find the call letters of stations on the wave- 
length of that station and those having approximately that 
wavelength. Reference to the schedule of programs apply- 
ing to the time you are listening will show you which of 
these stations is broadcasting the program to which you 
are listening, and you can thus identify it without having 
to wait for call letters. 



April, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 17 



"RADIO CITY" 

M. H. AYLESWORTH, president of NBC, and HIRAM 
BROWN, president of R. K. O, examine the plaster model of 
"Radio City," the $250,000,000 Rockefeller development which 
will cover three city blocks in mid-town New York. Construc- 
tion starts June 15, and the entire "city" is to be completed within 
three years. The view pictured is of the Fifth Avenue facade, 
with a glimpse of the Fifty-first Street elevation. Beginning at 
the left (Forty-eighth Street), we see the Collegiate Church of 
St. Nicholas (the only building now on the site which will not 
be razed). The tall building to the left will house the R. K. O. 
Vaudeville Theatre; the tallest building (center) will be occupied 
by RCA and NBC, and will be the largest building in the world 
in amount of floor space. Next comes the R. K. O. office build- 
ing. On Fifty-first Street will be the R. K. O. Picture Theatre, 
and probably on Forty-eighth Street will be the new Metropolitan 
Opera-house. Of particular interest to the radio audience is the 
fact that the theatres will be built with both radio and television 
in mind, as will also the forty-three NBC studios. 

NBC hopes with much confidence that "television will emerge 
definitely from the laboratory at about the time that the Radio 
City is completed." 









'ilhhi/lwo 
Children, 



L/oj-cx <h)or\sel 1(2, 



Stan of tho Metropolitan and Chicago Civic Opera Companiei are the guesi artiitj when the Simmons 
Program! go on the air. GIGLI, ROSA PONSELLE, MARTINELLI, URii/A and ONEGIN were the 
March rccit alists in the order named. Equally famoui .mists will appear each Monday evening in April and 
on May 4. 

The lingcri are accompanied by a large concert orchestra under the direction ol Wilfred Pelletier, con- 
ductot of the Metropolitan Opera Company. 

[| il the purpose of this program to bring the radio audience the song! that ill the world lltt loved best 
by the world's best loved singers. 



Page iS 



WHAT'S O IS THE AIR 



April, 1931 





SUNDAY 




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8 



* On Air Part Time. 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
ffl Dr. S. Parkes Cadman 

Radio choir and orchestra ; direc- 
tion, Geo. Dilworth. 

d Williams Oilomatics 

Orchestra ; direction, Josef Koest- 
ner. 

© New York Philharmonic 
Symphony Orchestra 

Last concert, April 19. 

ffl Dr. S. Parkes Cadman 
[5] Sparklets 

Wood wind ensemble, followed by 
Program B. 

d'Tour Eyes" 

Musical ensemble. 

© New York Philharmonic 
H Davey Hour 

Mixed chorus; orchestra; Chandler 
Goldthwaite, organist. 

a National Vespers 

Dr. Harry Fosdick; the Pilgrims 
sextet ; orchestra. 

Q Dr. Donald Barnhouse 

(1 Davey Hour 

a National Vespers 

Sweethearts of the Air 

ffl Catholic Hour 

Sermon; music by Medievalists; 
guest artists. 

a Raising Junior 

Humorous skit, with Aline Berry 
and Peter Dixon. 

(5] Margaret Olsen 

Soprano. 

Fox Fur Trappers 

With Earle Nelson. 

ffl Catholic Hour 
H] Musical Moment 

Guest artist. 

© Fox Fur Trappers 
ffl Catholic Hour 
ffl Cook's Travelogue 
[g] Northern Lights 

Astrid Fjelde and the Tollefson trio. 

Q Howard Dandies 

Freddie Rich's orchestra and guest 
artists. 

ffl Catholic Hour 
ffl Cook's Travelogue 
Howard Dandies 

H Iodent Club 

With Bob Emery and the Joy 
Spreaders; directed by Joe Rines. 

LU Westinghouse Salute 

Symphony orchestra. 

Golden Hour of the Little Flower 

Rev. Chas. E. Coughlin, from Detroit. 

Golden Hour of the Little 
Flower 
Iodent Club 
"Westinghouse Salute 
RCA Victor Program 

Orchestra direction, Nathaniel Shil- 
kret; one-act play. (Alternate.) 

Harbor Lights 

Edwin Whitney and Leslie Joy, in 
tales of an old sea captain. 

Golden Hour of the Little 

Flower 

Golden Hour of the Little 

Flower 

RCA Victor Program 

Harbor Lights 



© 
© 

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LA] 

\T\ Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 

Rubinoff conducting; Maurice Chev- 
alier. 

a Enna Jettick Melodies 

Betsy Ayres, Mary Hopple, Steele 
Jamison, Leon Salathiel. 

© "Devils, Drugs and Doctors" 

Prof. Howard W. Haggard. 



C.S.T. 

3 



30 



30 

5 



15 



30 



45 



6 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:00 a.m. — Heroes of the Church. 
10:15 — Children's Program. 
Noon — Jewish Art Program. 
12:30 — International Broadcasts. 
12:45 — Grenadier Guards Band of Montreal. 

1:30 — Ballad Hour. 

2:00 — Cathedral Hour. 

3:00 — New York Philharmonic. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

9:00 a.m. — The Balladeers. 
1 1 :00 — Neapolitan Days. 
11:30 — Special Symphony Orchestra. 

1 :00 — National Oratorio Society. 

2:00 — Moonshine and Honeysuckle. 

2:30 — NBC Artists' Service. 

3:00 — The Pilgrims. 

3:30 — Swift Garden Party. 



NBC (through WJZ). 
1 1 :00 A. M. — Nomads. 
11:30 — Special Symphony Orchestra. 
12:45 — Echoes of the Orient. 

1 :O0 — Metropolitan Echoes. 

1:30 — Little Jack Little. 

2:00 — Library of Congress Musicale. 

2:30 — Yeast Foamers. 

3:00 — Dr. Daniel A. Politic 



KEY TO LOCAL PROGRAMS 
N News S Sports 

Educational T Dramatic 

P Children's V Variety 

feature W Comic 

R Religious X On the air 



M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 

M Variety 



April, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 19 



E.ST. 
15 



30 

45 

9 



30 



10 



30 



11 



30 



12 

30 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Q Rhythm Choristers 
[5j Collier's Radio Hour 

Orchestra; dramatized stories; guest 
speakers. 

Q] Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 
© Kaltenborn Edits the News 

(T) Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 

[5] Collier's Kadio Hour 

O Piano Pals 

[TJ Chase and Sanborn Orchestra 

[5] Collier's Radio Hour 

[A] "Our Government" 



David Lawrence. (First 15 min.) 
Paster- 



Atwater Kent Hour 



Orchestra ; direction, Josef 
nack. (Second 15 min.) 

[2] Program [A] Followed by [B] 

[0 Collier's Radio Hour 

(First 15 min.) 

[C] Radio Luminaries 

(Second 15 min.) 

HI Program JE| Followed by [C] 
© Coty's Play Girl 

Irene Bordoni. 

© Graham-Page Hour 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra and 
Edgar Guest. 

[3] Atwater Kent Hour 
\D\ Floyd Gibbons 

(First 15 min.) 

[F] Reminiscences 

(Second 15 min ) 

CD Program [0 Followed by 



[A] Atwater Kent Hour 

(First 15 min.) 

[B] National Dairy Program 

(Second 15 min.) 

\f\ Program [A] Followed by [B] 

[F] Reminiscences 

(First 15 min.) 

© Royal's Poet of the Organ 

Jesse Crawford and the Duotones. 

[C] National Dairy Program 

(First 15 min.) 

[D] Sunday at Seth Parker's 

Down East hymn sing. (Second 15 
min.) 

HI Program [C] Followed by[D] 
[6] Kaffee Hag Slumber Music 

.String ensemble. 

Q The Gauchos 

© Be Square Motor Club 



gj Sunday at Seth Pai-ker's 

(First 15 min.) 

[3] Program [E] Followed by 
Muriel and Vee 

(Second 15 min.) 

[7] Even Song 

(First 15 min.) Followed by 

[G| Heel Hugger Harmonies 

Quartet and orchestra. (Second 15 
min.) 

O Back Home Hour from Buffalo 

Sermon by Rev. Clinton Churchill. 

\4\ Russian Cathedral Choir 
Nicholas Vai Llieff, direi toi 

[A] South Sea Islanders 

Joseph Rodgers, director. 

O Back Home Hour from 
Buffalo 



Q Quiet Harmonies 

Vincent Sorey and orchestra. 
Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at the organ. 



C. S.T. 

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♦ On Air I'.rt Time 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 



F.. S. T. 



T., 2 



Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
.1:30— Little Brown Church, Wl.S. 
3:30 — Chinatown Rescue Service, WMCA. 
5:00 — All Canadian Symphony Hour, over 
WWJ and all CN Canadian stations. 
5:30— R:d Lacquer .:nd Jade, \VOR. 



7:00- — J.irvis Street Baptist Church, Toronto, 
CKGW. 

7:00 — The Baltimorcans, WBAL. 
7:00— Chronicles, WTMJ. 
8:00 -Manor House Opera, WON. 
8:00— Arlington Orchestra. KTHS. 
8:30 — Sunday Evenin| Club. WMAQ. 
9:00 -Ludwig Baum.m Program, WOR. 



'>:()() Sports Review, KDKA. 
9:00— Swedish Program, Vi't I I 
9:30— Crosley Concert Hour, WLW. 

10:15— Rhythm Symphony, WSM. 

10:30 — Grucn Guildsmen, WKRC. 

10:30 — The Solitaire Cowboys, KOA. 

11:30— Bill Hay in Bible Readings. WMAQ. 

11:49 The Homing Hour, WHAS. 



Midnight- Radio Rodeo. WHN, W'TAI'. 

WGBS, W M< A. 
Midnight— Dance Musi!, KY\\ 

Midnight — Quiet Harmonies. WEAN. 
Midnight — Crosley Review, WLW. 
Midnight — Coon-Sanders Orchestra, WGN 
Midnight — Music About Town. KMIH 
12:30 — Light Opera, KMOX. 
1:00— Nutts Club. WBBM. 



Page 20 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



MONDAY 




• 




• 






• 




April 


• 


6 . 


13 


• 


20 


• 




27 


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8 15 30 45 


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* On Air Part Time. 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
ffl U. S. Service Band 

a Dance Orchestra 

Ann Leaf at the Organ 

Followed by C. 

B Radio Listening Test 

C U. S. Service Band 

Q Program B Followed by C 

© Dance Music from New York 

1 Matinee Melodies 

ffl U. S. Service Band 

|2l Tea Timers 

1] Chats with Peggy Winthrop 

(First 15 min.) 

Art Gillham 

(First 15 min.) Followed by 

Gypsy Music Makers 

Emeiy Deutsch Orchestra. 

[AjGobel Mystery Girl 

1 The Lady Next Door 

(Children's program.) 

I Program |A] Followed by 
Rex Cole Mountaineers 

Vocal and instrumental. 

ffl Reports 

Stock market business, etc. 

D Talk by Dr. John H. Finley 

(First 15 min.) 

E La Gerardine Program 

(Second 15 min.) 

© Program D Followed by 
Program E 

ffl Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

Direction, Ludwig Laurier. 

| Ford and Wallace, from Chicago 

Fulton Royal Orchestra 
\9\ Mormon Tabernacle Choir 

Choir and organ. 

ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
© Fulton Royal Orchestra 
Q Nino Martini 

Tenor. 

1 "Who's Behind the Name?" 

| Mormon Tabernacle Choir 

Q Eno Crime Club 

ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
[A] Literary Digest Topics 

Lowell Thomas. 

a A Musical Demi-tasse 

John Barclay and Dagmer Rybner. 

| Amos V Andy 
O Current Events 

Kaltenborn. 

© Dance Orchestra 
| The World To-day 

James G. McDonald. 

[Cl Tastyeast Jesters 

Dwight Latham, Wainp Carlson and 
Guy Bonham. 

| Careless Love 

Negro sketch. 

© Phil Cook 

Evangeline Adams 

Astrologer. 

© Anheuser-Busch Program 

Tony Cabooch. 

El Roxy Theater 

Vocal and instrumental soloists, or- 
chestra. 

[7] Fifteen Minutes in Nation's 
Capital 



C.S.T. 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:00 A. M. — Morning Devotions. 

8:30 — Tony's Scrap-book. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
10:00-12:00 — Radio Home-makers. 
12:00-2:30 — Music. 

2:30— American School of the Air. 

3:00 — Columbia Salon Orchestra. 

3:30— Ann Leaf at Organ. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

8:00 — Gene and Glenn, E. S. T. stations. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:00 — Gene and Glenn, C. S. T. stations. 

9:02 — Parnassus String Trio. 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:30— Jean Carroll. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

7:30 — Rise and Shine (band). 

8:30 — Vermont Lumber Jacks. 

9:45 — Miracles of Magnolia. 
10:00 — Safeguarding Food Supply. 
10:45— Winifred S. Carter. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO LOCAL PROGRAMS 

N News S Sports 

O Educational T Dramatic 

P Children's V Variety 

feature W Comic 

R Religious X On the air 



M 1. Band 
M 1. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 6. Novelty 



M 6. Popular 
M 7. Symphonic 
M 8. Organ 
M 9. Semi-classical 
M Variety 



April, 193 1 










WHAT' 


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Page 21 


E.S.T 

8 

15 
30 

45 

9 

30 

10 

30 
11 

30 


CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Q] "How's Business?" 

Jlerle Thorpe. 

(5] Roxy Theater 
Q Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor's Band 

© Literary Digest Topics 
Barbasol Program 

Barber shop quartet. 

[2] Penzoil Pete 

Andy Sannella Xovelty Orchestra. 

® Roxy Theater 
[3] A. & P. Gypsies 

Quintet and orchestra; direction, 
Harry Horlick 

\6\ General Mills Express 
© The Simmons Hour 

Famous guest soloists. 

© The Simmons Hour 

H A. & P. Gypsies 

® General Mills Express 


C.S.T. 

7 

15 
30 

45 

8 

30 

9 

30 

10 

30 

11 

30 


April . 6 . 13 . 20 . 27 . . . . MONDAY 


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EASTERN TIME 


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WBT CHARLOTTE 1080 N.C. 


© The Three Bakers 

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don and Glenn Cross and Gibson 
Noland. 

® A. & P. Gypsies 
[7] Maytag Orchestra 

Direction, Victor Young. 

[§ Chesebrough Real Folks 

Sketch of small-town life. 

[4] General Motors Program 

Orchestra direction, Frank Black. 

© Evening in Paris 

Pierre Brugnon, master of ceremo- 
nies. 


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WSPD TOLEDO 1340 


O Robert Burns Program 

Guy Lombardo's orchestra. 

[T) Adventures of Sherlock Holmes 

Dramatic sketch. 

[5] Stromberg-Carlson Program 

Rochester Civic Orchestra; soloists. 

\2\ Symphonic Rhythm Makers 

Vaughn de Leath and Hugo Mariani 
Orchestra. 

[6] Empire Builders 

Dramatic sketch; orchestra direc- 
tion, Josef Koestner. 

@ Arabesque 

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#On Air P.rt Tim. 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
E. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:00— Topsy Turvy Time, \C'MAQ. 
6:45— little Orphan Annie, WGN. 
7:00— Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:00— Gene and Glenn. WTAM. 
7:10— The Deacon's Dicta. WCCO. 
7:30— Mike and Herman, WBBM, 



7:4^ George and Blossom, CFRB. 
T., 2 7:45— Bob Ncwhall (sports), WLW. 

8:00— Old Fiddlers. KTHS. 

8:)0— Hayes Hayloft Theater, WLS. 

9:00— Jug Band, WHAS. 

9:)0— Famous Singers, VI'MAQ. 

9:50 — Boxing Matches. WGBS. 
10:00— Star Dust, WBAP. 
10:00— Musical Movies. U'SM 



10:00— Kilowatt Hour, WTMJ. 
10:00 — Imperial Tobacco Joycastcrs. CKGW. 
10:15 — Mountain Valley Mouat'neeri, WBBM, 
I0r30 — Tilly and Billv. WGR. 
10:30— Ford Minstrel Show, Vs'DAF. 
10:30— Dixie Spiritual Singers. WRVA. 
10:30— Organ Recital, CFRB. 
I I :00 Sports and News, KYW. 

11:00— WitcHinj Hour, \\KR( 



I 1 00 Willys Mu»i< >l Memories, W'l w. 

I I zo Here l ouu and the Weasel, WGN. 
11:34 l> X < lub, WM \o. 

12:00 Dance Music, WMAQ. 
12:00- Dance Musi,., w 1 w . 
12:15 Ben Bcrnie, WBBM. 
I 2 : 1 ■> — Around the Town, WBBM. 
1:00— Frolic of Dodos, K I Sl>. 
I to 3 I ' ■ . I lollywood, KFWI1 



Page 22 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



TUESDAY 



April . 7 . 14 . 21 . 28 



EASTERN TIME 


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* On Air Part Time. 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Italian Idyll 

Vincent Sorey and orchestra. 

ffl Dancing Melodies 
[6l Pacific Vagabonds 

From San Francisco. 

[2j Twilight Hour 

U Pacific Vagabonds 
© Columbia Artist Recital 



A Rhythm Kings 

Nat Brusiloff, conductor. 

© Program A Followed by 
Adventures in Words 

Dr. Frank "Vizetelly. 

H Pond's 

Guest speaker; Leo Reisman's o 
ehestra. 

ffl Voices, Followed by 

Gems of Melody 
El Rinso Talkie 

(First 15 min.) 

UThe Lady Next Door 

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H] Program El Followed by [B] 
|4l Program El Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 
HI Stock Market Reports 
B Lowns Biltmore Orchestra 

Direction, Bert Loivn, followed by 

C Tony's Scrap-book 

© Program B Followed by C 



© Barclay Orchestra 

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ffl Black and Gold Room Orchestra 
[6] Raising Junior 

Serial domestic sketch with Aline 
Berry and Peter Dixon. 

ffl George Simons 

Tenor. 

U Walter Mills 

Baritone. 

Q] Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
O Barclay Orchestra 
Barclay Orchestra 
|H "Who's Behind the Name?" 
19] Savannah Liners Orchestra 

Direction, Dana S. Merriman. 

ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
El Literary Digest Topics 
© Eno Crime Club 



© Political Situation in Washington 

Frederic William AYile. 

[3] Voter's Service 

d Amos V Andy 

H Voter's Service 

[Cl U. S. Rubber Co. Program 

© American Mutual Program 

© Chiclets Program 

© Dance Orchestra 

|4l Soconyland Sketches 

[D] Phil Cook 

[4] Soconyland Sketches 

[U Billiken Pickards 

[E]The Scholl Program 

© Daddy and Rollo 

Humorous sketch. 



C.S.T. 

3 



30 



30 



15 

30 

45 



6 

15 
30 

45 



CBS. 

8:30 A. M. — Tony's Scrap-book. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 

9:30 — Morning Moods. 
10:00-12:00 — Radio Home-makers. 
10:15 — Fashion Facts. 
10:30 — O'Cedar Time. 

2:30 — American School of the Air. 

3:00 — Columbia Salon Orchestra. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

8:00 a.m. — Gene and Glenn. 

8:15 — Morning Devotions. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9 : 1 5 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
11:00 — "Your Child." 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

2:30— Edna Wallace Hopper. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

8:30 — Vermont Lumber Jacks. 

8:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:15 — Through the Looking-glass. 
10:45 — Josephine Gibson. 
1 1 :30 — Blue Valley Homestead. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

3 :00 — Music in the Air. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



TO 



KEY 

N News 
O Educational 
P Children's 
feature 
R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religions 
M 5. Novelty 



LOCAL PROGRAMS 
S Sports 
T Dramatic 
V Variety 
W Comic 
X On the air 

M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 
M Variety 



April, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 23 



E.S.T 

8 



15 



30 



45 



30 



10 



30 



11 



30 



12 



30 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
© Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor's Band. 

Q Literary Digest Topics 
[TJ Blackstone Plantation 

Julia Sanderson and Frank Crumit. 

HI Paul Whiteman's Paint Men 
Old Gold Character Readings 

Lorna Fantin, numerologist. 

ffl Blackstone Plantation 

[5] Paul Whiteman's Paint Men 

[2] Florsheim Frolic 

Coon-Sanders orchestra. 

[6] Breyer Leaf Boys 

[7] Works of Great Composers 

Orchestra; direction, Hugo Mariani. 

Q Kaltenborn Edits the News 
© CBS Feature 

[2] Florsheim Frolic 

[§] Works of Great Composers 

[3] McKesson Musical Magazine 

Concert orchestra. 

[9] Household Celebrities Program 
© Henry-George 

Events in lives of two travelers. 

© Philco Symphony Concert 

Howard Barlow, conductor. 

(4] Happy Wonder Bakers 

Male trio, singing violins, orchestra. 

(A) Death Valley Days 

Dramatic sketch. 

[TJ Lucky Strike Dance Orchestra 

B. A. Rolfe conducting. 

(4) To Be Announced 

A Graybar — Mr. and Mrs. 

Events in lives of Joe and Vi. 

B Blue Ribbon Malt Jester 

Richard Craig, Jr., comedian. 

O Program A Followed by B 
Paramount Publix Radio 

Playhouse; guest artists, orchestra, 
screen chats by Jerry Madison. 

(TJ Lucky Strike Orchestra 

[C] Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous skit. 

[5] Program [C] Followed by 
Johnny Marvin 

[A] Rapid Transit 

Sketches of metropolitan life. 

[B] Vincent Lopez and His Orchestra 
[2] Program g] Followed by [B] 
\S\ Slumber Music 

[D] Amos 'n' Andy 

[7] Program [D] Followed by [6] 
C Paul Tremaine and His Orchestra 
D Cremo Cigar Program 

Arthur Pryor'a Hand. 

© Program C Followed by D 
Q Dance Music from Montreal 
[3] Vincent Lopez and Orchestra 
[6] Slumber Music. 

(TJ Jack Albin's Orchestra 
IU Phil Spitalny's Music 
O Dance Orchestra 
Nocturne 

Ann \,::ii at the organ. 

[Tl Jack Albin's Orchestra 

g] Phil Spitalny's Music 



c. S.T. 

7 



April . 7 . 14 . 21 . 28 



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NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
F. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:30— Uncle Bob, KYW. 
6:45— Little Orphan Annie, WGN. 
7:00— Pynch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:00— Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 
7:10 — Deacons Dicta, WCCO. 
7:15— Rieck Revelers, KDKA. 



7:30— Mike and Herman, WBBM. 
T., 2 7:)0— Swedish Orchestra, WCCO. 

7:45— Ohio State Night School, WLW. 
8:00— Melody Boys, CI RU. 
8:00— Adam and I «, W'XYX. 
8:J0— Bubble Blowers, Wl \\ '. 
8:30— Mabel Garrison, WBAI 
9:30— Al and IVte, WBBM. 
10:00— Minstrel Show, VI W. 



10:15— The- c hatterboz, WKBW. 

10:30— Black Hawk, KSTP. 

10:30 — Bunte Program, WMAQ. 

10:45 — Bob Newhal] (sports), WLW. 

11:00— Witching Hour, WKRC 

11:00— The Marylanders, WBAL. 

11:00— Sports and News, KYW. 

11:00— Music Box Review, WIBO. 

I I :20— Herr Louie and the Weasel, WGN. 



11:30— Dan and Sylvia. WMAQ. 

11:30— Romanclli's Orchestra, C.K(A\". 
11:30 — General Electric Hour, KOA. 
12:00— Beach View Orchestra, WMAQ. 
12:15 — Around the Town, WBBM. 
12:30— Boxing Bouts, KFWB. 

l :00— Hotel Gibson Orchestra, WLW. 

1:30— Salt and Peanuts, WLW. 

2:00 — Garbcr's Congress Orchestra, KYW. 



Page 24 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



April, 1931 



WEDNESDAY 




• 




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1240 DETROIT WXYZ 
750 DETROIT WJR 
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E. S.T, 

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* On Air Part Time. 



30 

45 

7 

15 



30 



45 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
© U. S. Service Band 
ffl Morgan Trio 

Marguerite, pianist; Frances, vio- 
linist; Virginia, harpist. 

B Eastman Symphony Orchestra 

From WHAM, Rochester, N. Y. 

[A) Sky Sketches 

B Mabel Wayne Hour 

© U. S. Service Band 



B 



ffl 
© 



The Lady Next Door 

(Children's program.) 

The Book Reporter 

Clifton Fadiman. 

I Ivy Scott 

Soprano. 

Program [D] Followed by 
Jolly Junketeer 

(Children's program.) 

Program [D] Followed by [Ej 

Asbury Park Casino Orchestra 

Gobel Mystery Girl 

Tea Timers 

Program [B] Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 

Reports 

Stock market, business, etc. 



A The Round Towners 

B 

© 



Tony's Scrap-book 
Program A Followed by B 



ffl Women in Government Service 

NBC from Washington. 

B Raising Junior 

Domestic skit with Aline Berry and 
Peter Dixon. 

B Smith Ballew and His Orchestra 
O Bill Schudt's Going to Press 
B Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

Ludwig Laurier. 

[A] Conti Gondoliers 

Jimmy Haupt, tenor; orchestra, 
Billy Artzt. 

© President's Emergency 
Committee Speaker 

B Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
B Gloria Gay's Affairs 
Q Winegar's Barn Orchestra 
© Eno Crime Club 
B Uncle Abe and David 

Rural sketch with Phillips Lord and 
Arthur Allen. 

[C] Literary Digest Topics 

B Little Jack Little 

[D]Amos 'n' Andy 

O Morton Downey 

© Central Savings Serenaders 

Sam Loyd, puzzle-maker. 

© Ferdinando's Orchestra 

[5] Science 

A talk. 

BThe Edward Rambler 
B Silver Masked Tenor 
\6\ Boscul Moments 

Mme. Frances Alda and Frank La 
Forge. 

gH Phil Cook 

© Evangeline Adams 

Astrologer. 

© Daddy and R0II0 

Humorous dialogue. 

ffl Back of the News in Washington 

William Hard. 

|H) Smith Brothers Orchestra 



C.S.T. 

3 



30 



30 



15 



30 

45 

6 

15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:30 — Morning Devotions. 

8:45 — The Old Dutch Girl. 
10:00 to Noon— Radio Home-makers. 
12:00 — Paul Trcmainc. 

2:00 — Columbia Artist Bureau. 

2:30 — American School of Air. 

3:00 — Columbia Salon Orchestra. 

3:30 — Syncopated Silhouettes. 



NBC (through WEAF). 
8:30 — Cheerio. 
9:15 — Campbell Program. 
9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:00 to 12:00 — Household Interests including 
National Home Hour, Bell, Crocker, 
Radio Household Institute. 
12:00 — On Wings of Song. 
3:30— Radio Play Bill. 



NBC (through WJZ). 

7:45— Jolly Bill and Jane. 

9:45 — Miracles of Magnolia. 
10:00 — Mary Hale Martin. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

2:15 — AI and Pete. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:00 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30 — Evening Stars. 



KEY TO LOCAL 
N News 
O Educational 
P Children's 
feature 
R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



PROGRAMS 
S Sports 
T Dramatic 
V Variety 
W Comic 
X On the air 

M 6. Popular 
M 7. Symphonic 
M 8. Organ 
M 9. Semi-classical 
M Variety 



April, 193 1 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 25 



IB 

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CHAIK PROGRAMS 
Listerine Program 

Bobby Jones, golf chats. 

Mellowtones 
Cremo Program 
Literary Digest Topics 
Barbasol Program 

Barber shop quartet. 

Radiotron Varieties 

"Bugs" Baer. Welcome Lewis, Sam 
Herman, Harold van Emburgh. 

.Mellowtones 
Mobiloil Concert 

Henry M. Neely; guest artists; or- 
chestra direction, Nathaniel Shilkret. 

Canadian Pacific Program 
Sun Kist Musical Cocktail 

Sun Kist Musical Cocktail 
Mobiloil Concert 
Canadian Pacific Program 



@j Halsey Stuart Program 

"Old Counsellor," symphony or- 
chestra. 

UD Wayside Inn 

The Choristers. 

© Gold Medal Fast Freight 

Male quartet and organist. 

Savino Tone Pictures 

Vocal solos ; large chorus. 

[5] Palmolive Hour 

Soloists; male quartet; orchestra 
direction, Gustave Haenschen. 

\9\ Camel Pleasure Hour 

Soloists; male chorus; piano duo; 
orchestra direction, Charles Previn. 



m 

m 
o 





Palmolive Hour 
Camel Pleasure Hour 
International Shoe Program 

Vitality personalities. 

International Shoe Program 

Followed by 

Gypsy Trail 

Columbia Concerts Bureau 

Concert and opera artists. 

Coca Cola Program 

Sports interview by Grantland Rice; 
string orchestra; direction, Leonard 
Joy. 

Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous sketch. (First 15 min.) 
Followed by 



Poems 

Reading by Howard M. Claney. 

[3] Vincent Lopez Orchestra 
[§ Amos V Andy 

(First 15 min.) 

[B] Camel Pleasure Hour 

'S'-cond 15 min.) 

[§] Program [A] Followed by [S] 
[7] Slumber Music 

String en emble; direction, Ludwig 
Lauriir. 

A Royal Canadians 

Direction, Buy Lombardo. 

B Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor'i Band. 

@ Program A Followed by B 

O Dance Orchestra 

[4] Jack Albin's Orchestra 

QQ Slumber Music 

[91 ( lame) Pleasure Hour 



[TJ Florence Richardson's Orchestra 
[A] ( Samel Pleasure Hour 

| In ,1 I.", 11. in. I 

[3] Henry Busse's Orchestra 
O St. Moritz Orchestra 
Q Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at thfl orpran. 

[2] Joe Morgan's Orchestra 
[4] Wayne King's Orchestra 

From Chicago. 



c.s.s. 

7 



15 



30 



45 



8 



30 



30 



10 



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11 



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April . 1 . 8 . 15 . 22 . 29 



WEDNESDAY 



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WBAP Ft. Worth 800 

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♦ On Air Part Tim. 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 



E. S. T. 



C. S. T., 2 



Subtract 1 hour for 
for M. S. T. 
6:45— Little Orphan Annie. VGN. 
7:00— Gene and Glenn, \VTA\I. 
7:10 — Deacon's Dicta, W'CCO. 
7:>n— Joe and the Cap'n, WHAS 
7:45— Jack Turner, W'HAS. 

8!O0— Bachelor Cii;.ir Program, (K(.\\ 



8:30— Doingl of the Gordons, V.'l S. II 

9:00 — Canova Program, Wl W. 11 

9:00 — Quinn Ryan's Ramble*, W'GN. II 

9:30— Dram.i, WGR. I I 

10:00 — Sports and News, KYW. II 

10:00— Wccncr Minstrel., \\1\R. II 

10:30 — Old Spanish Sine,inK School, WHK 12 

10:3 — Sara Ann McCabe, W'IBO. 12 

!0:45— Bob Ncwhall. Wl W 



00— Witching Hour, \\"KR< . 

00 — Richmond Orchestra, WRVA. 

20— Herr Louie and WeAsel, \V(,\ 

30— Croslcy Theater of Air. Wl \\ 

30— Dan an, I Sylvia, WMAQ. 

30— Wayne Kind's Orchestra, KYW. 

00 Dance Music, WMAQ. 

IS — Around the Town. WBBM. 

00 Garber'i Congress Orchestra, K">\\ 



Readers are invited to write in about loc .il 

programs regularly featured, which are un- 
usual, either in content or quality, and which 
they recommend to other listener*. Be sure 
to give station and time and description, -is 

well .is the title. We are unable to list many 

programs which have been recommended be- 

cause of failure to give time. 



Page z6 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April. 1931 



THURSDAY 



April . 2 . 9 . 16 . 23 . 30 



EASTERN TIME 


4 


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5 


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6 


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7 


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* On Air Part Time. 



7 



15 



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45 



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CHAIN PROGRAMS 
The Three Doctors 

Russell Pratt, Ransom Sherman 'and 
Joe Randolph. 

The Magic of Speech 
Home Decorations 



C.S.T. 

3 



(First 15 min.) 



Program 

Ballads 

Asbury Park Casino 

Dancing Melodies 

U. S. Service Band 



Followed by 



Melody Magic 

Girls' trio and Emery Deutsch's or- 
chestra. 

a The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

ffl Brazilian-American Program 
[A] Rinso Talkie 

(First 15 min.) 

[4] Program [A] Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 
a Stock Market Reports 
A Virginia Arnold 

Pianist. 

© Program A Followed by 
La Gerardine Program 



© Fulton Royal Orchestra 

Direction, Gordon Kibbler. 

ffl Black and Gold Room Orchestra 
[5] Raising Junior 

Serial sketch. 

\S\ Susan Steell 

Soprano. 

[TJ Black and Gold Kooni 

Orchestra 
ffl Gruen Answer Man 
Fulton Eoyal Orchestra 
Q Pancho and His Orchestra 
ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
\§\ Wheeler Sea Song 

Instrumental trio ; baritone soloist. 

a Peter van Steeden Orchestra 
[U Uncle Abe and David 

Phillips Lord and Arthur Allen in 
serial sketch. 

[A] Literary Digest Topics 
Q Eno Crime Club 



O Morton Downey 

© Fro Joy Novelty Dance Program 

a Mid-week Hymn Sing 

Mixed quartet. 

a Amos 'n' Andy 

[3] Mid-week Hymn Sing 
[C] Tastyeast Jesters 

Latham, Carlson and Bonham. 

© St. Moritz Orchestra 
Q Chiclets Program 

Q St. Moritz Orchestra 
[4] Niagara-Hudson Program 

Dramatic sketch, orchestra. 

ID] Phil Cook 

|4| Niagara-Hudson Program 
Daddy and Rollo 

Humorous sketch. 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:30 — Tony's Scrap-book. 

8:45 — Morning Minstrels. 
10:00 — Radio Home-makers. 
10:45 — Barbara Gould. 
11:30- — Uneeda Bakers. 
11:45- — Peter Pan Forecasts. 

2:30 — American School of Air. 

3:00 — Rhythm Ramblers. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:00 — Ceresota Program. 
10:15 — Master Gardner. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

2:30 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30— La Forge Berumen Musical. 



NBC (through WJZ). 
10:00— Libby, McNeil & Libby. 
11:00 — Mrs. A. M. Goudiss. 
11:30 — Odorono Program. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

1:30— George, the Lava Man. 

2:15— Al and Pete. 

2:45— Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30 — Chicago Sorenade. 



KEY TO LOCAL PROGRAMS 
N News S Sports 

O Educational T Dramatic 

P Children's V Variety 

feature W Comic 

R Religious X On the air 



M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religious 
M 5. Novelty 



M 6. Popular 

M 7. Symphonic 

M 8. Organ 

M 9. Semi-classical 

M Variety 



April. 1931 



WHAT'S OjV THE AIR 



Page 2^ 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
E. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:30— Uncle Bob, KYW. 
6:30— Dog Club, WLW. 
6:45 — Little Orphan Annie, WON. 
7:00— Philip's Flyers KMOX. 
7:00 — Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 
7:00 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 



7:10 — Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 
T., 2 7:30— Bernice and Thelma, WXYZ. 

7:30— Mike and Herman, WBBM. 
7:30— Minstrels, WTAM. 
7:45 — George and Blossom, CFRB. 
8:00 — Bamberger Little Symphony, WOR. 
8:00 — Buckingham Boosters, CFRB. 
8:00— Adam and Eve, WXYZ. 
8:00— Los Amigos, WLW. 



9:00— Armco Band, WLW. 

9:30— Concert, CPRY. 
10:00— Hollingsworth Hall, WLW. 
10:00— When We Were Twenty-one, WBAL. 
10:00 — Drama — Romance of Canada, CNRM 

and all CN stations. 
10:00— Hydrox Program, WMAQ. 
10:45— Bob Newhall, WLW. 
11:00— Sports and News, KYW. 



E.S.T 

8 


J CHAIN PROGRAMS 
© Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor's Band. 

© Literary Digest Topics 
[T) Fleischman Hour 

Rudy Vallee and guest artists. 

[4] Edgeworth Program 

Negro spirituals. 

[T] Fieischmann Hour 
d Rin-Tin-Tin Thriller 

Dog stories. 

© Mary Charles 

O Kaltenborn Edits the News 

UJ Fieischmann Hour 
[5] Salada Salon Orchestra 

Direction, Nathaniel Shilkret. 

[TJ Fieischmann Hour 

[5] Salada Salon Orchestra 

© The Hamilton Watchman 

Dramatic sketch. 


G.S.T. 

7 

15 
30 

45 

8 

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9 

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10 

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11 
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Brad Browne and Al Llewelyn. 

B Old Gold Character Readings 

Lorna Fantin. 

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Soloists; the Rondoliers and string 
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\6\ Blackstone Plantation 

Frank Crumit and Julia Sanderson; 
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|3] Jack Frost's Melody Moments 

Orchestra direction, Eugene Or- 
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[7] Maxwell House Ensemble 

Soloists; male quartet; orchestra 
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[4] Echoes of the Opera 

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HI Program [C] Followed by [D] 

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[2] Program g) Followed by [B] 
[6] Slumber Music 

String ensemble; Ludwig Laurier. 

[F] Amos V Andy 

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Slumber Music 
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*On Air Part Tim* 



11:00— Music Box Review, W'IBO. 
11:00— Old Masters Program, WLW. 
11:20 — Herr Louie and Weasel, WGN. 
il:30 — Wayne King's Orchestra, KYW. 
12:00 — Coon-Sanders Orchestra, WGN. 
12:00 — Hotel Gibson Orchestra, WLW. 
12:15— Around the Town, WBBM. 

1:30 — Salt and Peanuts, WLW. 

2:00 — Garber's Congress Orchestra, KYW. 



Page 28 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



FRIDAY 




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1120 ORLANDO WDBO 








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1000 Davenp't WOC 

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600 WATERLOO WMT 


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820 LOUISVILLE WHAS 










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940 PORTLAND WCSH 


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600 BALTIMORE WCAO 


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MiCll. 1410 BAY CITY WBCM 








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750 DETROIT WJR 








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1460 ST. PAUL KSTP 




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610K'NS'SCITYWDAF 
1090 ST. LOUIS KMOX 


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E.S.T 

4 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



* On Air Part Time. 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
ffl Dancing Melodies 

a Radio Guild 

Famous play with guest star. 

O Columbia Salon Orchestra 
© Rhythm Ramblers 

Nat Brusiloff and orchestra. 

ffl Dancing Melodies 

[51 Radio Guild 



a The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

a Chats with Peggy Winthrop 
© Light Opera Gems 

Direction, Channon Collinge. 

[A] Benjamin Moore Triangle 
a Program [A] Followed by 

Rex Cole Mountaineers 
a Program [A] Followed by 

Tea Timers 

Dance band. 

ffl Reports 

Stock market, etc. 

A Tony's Scrap-book 



ffl The World in Music 

Pierre Key. 

a Raising Junior 

Serial, domestic skit. 

a Smith Ballew's Orchestra 

© Winegar's Barn Orchestra 

© Winegar's Barn Orchestra 

a Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

ffl Smith Ballew's Orchestra 

a Black and Gold Room 
Orchestra 

a Sundial Bonnie Laddies 

© Winegar's Barn Orchestra 

Q Eno Crime Club 

a Uncle Abe and David 

Rural sketch with Lord and Allen. 

a Literary Digest Topics 



a Major Bowes' Family 

Soloists; orchestra direction, Yasha 
Bunchuk. 

a Amos V Andy 

© Morton Downey 

American Mutual Program 

a Major Bowes' Family 
a Boscul Moments 

Mme. Alda and Frank La Forge. 

a Major Bowes' Family 
a Pbil Cook 
Ferdinando's Orchestra 
© The World's Business 

Dr. Julius Klein. 

a Major Bowes' Family 
[Dl To Be Announced 



C.S.T. 

3 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 

8:45 — Old Dutch Girl. 
10:15 — Crumit and Sanderson. 
11:00 — Emily Post. 
11:15 — Winifred Carter. 
11:30 — Mrs. John S. Reilly. 
11:45 — Beatrice Herford. 

2:30 — American School of Air. 

3:00 — U. S. Service Band. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45— A. & P. Program. 
10:00 — National Home Hour. 
10:15 — Mister Jupiter Pluvius. 
10:30 — Betty Crocker. 
10:45 — Dinah and Dora. 
1 1 :00 — National Music Appreciation. 

3:15 — U. S. Service Band. 



NBC (through WJZ). 
10:00— Libby, McNeil & Libby. 
10:45 — Josephine B. Gibson. 
1 1 :00 — Music Appreciation Hour. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 

2:15 — AI and Pete. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:00- — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO 


LOCAL PROGRAMS 


N News 






S Sports 


O Educational 






T Dramatic 


P Children's 






V Variety 


feature 






W Comic 


E Religious 






X On the air 


M 1. Band 


M 


6 


Popular 


M 2. Classical 


M 


7 


Symphonic 


M 3. Dance 


M 


8 


Organ 


M 4. Religious 


M 


9 


Semi-classical 


M 5. Novelty 


M 




Variety 



April. 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 29 



E.S.T 

8 



15 



30 



45 



30 



10 



30 



11 



30 



12 

30 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
[T| Cities Service Concert 

The Cavaliers; Jessica Dragonette; 
Leo O'Rourke; orchestra direction, 
Rosario Bourdon. 

@] Nestle's Program 

Orchestra direction, Nat Brusiloff. 

Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor's Band. 

© Literary Digest Topics 
© Barbarsol Program 

Barber shop quartet. 

[T] Cities Service Concert 

[4] Nestle 's Program 

[T] Cities Service Concert 

\5\ Breyer Leaf Boys 

B Johnny Marvin 

O The Dutch Masters 

Novel musical program. 

O The Dutch Masters 

[TJ Cities Service Concert 

[7] Natural Bridge Dancing Class 

Arthur Murray and orchestra ; direc- 
tion, Lewis Graeme. 



[2] The Clicquot Club 

Orchestra direction, HaiTy Reser. 

[§] The Interwoven Pair 

Billy Jones and Ernie Hare; orches- 
tra direction, "Will C. Perry. 

© True Story Hour 

Dramatized story. 

© True Story Hour 
B Enna Jettick Songbird 

(First 15 min.) Followed by 

Two Troupers 

ilarcella Shields and Helene Handin. 

B Armour Program 

Mixed chorus; orchestra direction, 
Josef Koestner. 



[TJ Eastman Kodak Hour 
[4] Armstrong Quakers 

Lois Bennett; Mary Hopple; male 
quartet; orchestra direction, Don 
Voorhees. 

O Van Huesen Program 
© March of Time 

Dramatized news. 

\2\ RKO Theater of the Air 

Orchestra direction, Milton Schwarz- 
wald; film; vaudeville; radio stars. 

[A] Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous skit. 

[5] Program [A] Followed by 
Cub and Scoop 



[3] Vincent Lopez Orchestra 

JB] Amos V Andy 

B Slumber Music 

A Noble Sissle and Orchestra 

B Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor's Band. 

© Program A Followed by B 

O Romanelli and King Edward 

Orchestra from Toronto. 

\3\ Vincent Lopez Orchestra 

B Slumber Music 

[TJ Dance Orchestra 
[2] Florence Richardson's Orchestra 
O Dance Music from New York 
© Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at the organ. 

ffl Dance Orchestra 
B Dance Orchestra 



C.S.T. 

7 



April . 3 . 10 . 17 



24 



FRIDAY 



15 



30 



45 



8 



30 



30 



10 



30 



11 



30 



4 


30 1 5 


30 


6 


15 


30 


45 


7 15 30 


45 


8 


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9 


30 


10 


30 


11 


30 12 


30 


EASTERN TIME 


3 


30 


4 


30 


5 


15 


30 


45 


6 


15 


30 


45 


7 


15 


30 45 


8 


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9 


30 


10 


30 11 


30 


CENTRAL TIME 


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NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
E. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 
for M. S. T. 
6:00— Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 
6:30— Uncle Bob, KYW. 
6:45 — Little Orphan Annie, WGN. 
7:00— Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:10 — Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 
7:}0— Bernicc and Thelma, WXYZ. 



7:30— Mike and Herman, WBBM. 

8:00— Macdonald British Consolicrs, CFRB. 

8:00— The Two Professors, WHAS. 

8:00— Jewish Musical Hour, WCFL. 

9:00 — Heatrolatown, WLW. 

9:00— The German Band, WISJ. 

9:45 — McGucrny and Lundbcrg, WCCO. 
10:00 — Mexican Trio, WOR. 
10:00 — Kingtastc Sonneteers, WLW. 



10:00— Lclewer Lads, WBBM. 
10:00— Canadian Pacific Concert, CKGW. 
10:00— Musical Travelogue, WENR. 
10:45— Bob Ncwhall, WLW. 
11:00— Witching Hour, WKRC. 
11:00— Sohio Night Club, WLW. 
11:10 — Warren Brown (sports), KYW. 
11:1 5 — Old Wagon Tongue — drama of Old 
West, KOA. 



11:20 — Herr Louie and Weasel, WGN. 
11:30— Wayne King, KYW. 
11:30— Dan and Sylvia, W'MAQ. 
12:00— Dance Music, WMAQ. 
12:00 — Spitalny's Orchestra, KYW. 
12:00 — Coon-Sanders Orchestra, WBBM. 
12:15 — Around the Town, WBBM. 

1:30 — Johnny Hamp's Orchestra, WLW. 

2:00 — Garbcr's Congress Orchestra, KYW. 



Page 30 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April, 1931 



SATURDAY 






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* On Air Port Time. 



30 



30 



15 



30 



45 



7 



15 



30 



45 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
© Ann Leaf at Organ 
ffl Classic Gems 
(U Court Jesters 
[U Pacific Feature Program 

From San Francisco. (Second 15 
rain.) 

[U Program [B] Followed by [C] 
[2] Song Shoppe 

Mildred Hunt, Landt Trio. 

|U Pacific Feature Program 
© Spanish Serenade 

Vincent Sorey and orchestra. 



© Orchestra Music from New York 
[3] The Lady Next Door 

Children's program. 

ffl Peter van Steeden's Orchestra 

Followed by 

Jolly Junketeer 

Children's program. 

[A] Tea Timers 
a Program [A] Followed by 
Rex Cole Mountaineers 

LU Peter van Steeden 's Orchestra 
[E] Junior Detectives 

Children's dramatic show. 

[§] Program [D] Followed by [E] 
A Orchestra from New York City 
B Tony's Scrap-book 
Q Program A Followed by B 



© Ted Husing's Sport Slants 

[TJ Black and Gold Room Orchestra 

ffl Raising Junior 

Domestic skit. 

© Ted Husing's Sport Slants 
ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
[E] Gruen Answer Man 
\§\ Smith Ballew's Orchestra 
ffl Black and Gold Room 

Orchestra 
IU Smith Ballew's Orchestra 
© Paul Tremaine's Orchestra 
© Eno Crime Club 
[2] Uncle Abe and David 

Phillips Lord and Arthur Allen in 
rural sketch. 

[9] Literary Digest Briefs 



[3] Salon Singers 

Sixteen voices ; directed by Geo. Dil- 
worth. 

[A] Amos V Andy 

© Morton Downey 

© Golden Blossom Honey 

© Ritz Carlton Hotel Orchestra 

[4] Laws that Safeguard Society 

Dean Gleason L. Archer. 

UH Tastyeast Jesters 

Latham, Carleson, Bonham. in jest 
and song. 

[5]Valspar Program 

Ted Lewis and his musical clowns. 

[C] Rise of the Goldbergs 

Humorous sketch. 

© Ritz Carlton Hotel Orchestra 
© Ritz Carlton Hotel Orchestra 
[U Valspar Program 
[U Pickard Family 

Southern folk songs. 



C.S.T. 



30 



4 



30 



15 



30 



45 



15 



30 



45 



CBS. 
10:30 — New World Salon Orchestra. 
1 1 :00 — Children's Program. 
11:30 — Columbia Revue. 
12:00- — Paul Tremaine's Orchestra. 

2:00 — Columbia Artist Recital. 

2:15 — National Democratic Club. 

3:00 — The Four Clubmen. 

3:30 — Saturday Syncopators. 



NBC (through WEAF). 

9:15 — Campbell Program. 

9:45 — A. & P. Program. 
10:15 — Emily Post. 
10:30 — Cooking Travelogue. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 
11:30— Keys to Happiness. 

1 :45 — League for Industrial Democracy. 

3:30 — Marionettes. 



NBC (through WJZ). 
8:30 — Vermont Lumber Jacks. 
8:45 — A. & P. Program. 
9:45 — Miracles of Magnolia. 
12:30 — National Home and Farm. 
1:30 — Keystone Chronicle. 
1:50 — Stock Market Reports. 
2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 
3:30- — Chicago Serenade. 



KEY TO LOCAL 



N News 
Educational 
P Children's 
feature 
R Religious 

M 1. Band 
M 2. Classical 
M 3. Dance 
M 4. Religions 
M 5. Novelty 



PROGRAMS 
S Sports 
T Dramatic 
V Variety 
W Comic 
X On the air 



Popular 

Symphonic 

Organ 

Semi-classical 

Variety 



April, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 31 



m 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
Webster Program 

Weber and Fields. 

Dixies Circus 



C.S.T. 

7 



Drama 
band. 



of circus life and circus 



o 

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m 

m 



1 Cremo Program 

Arthur Pryor's Band. 

Literary Digest Briefs 

Ben Alley and Ann Leaf 
I Radiotron Varieties 

"Bugs" Baer; soloists; orchestra 
direction, William Daly. 

To Be Announced 
The Silver Flute 

Legends of a -wandering gypsy. 

Fuller Man 

Earle Spicer, Handy Boys, Vee 
Lawnhurst, Don Voorhees' orches- 
tra. 

Wallace Silversmiths 
Early Bookworm 

Alexander Woollcott. 

The Silver Flute 
Fuller Man 



[4] General Electric Hour 

Symphony orchestra ; direction Wal- 
ter Damrosch; Floyd Gibbons. 

® The Campus 

Adventures of a Freshman. 

© Around the Samovar 

Russian music. 

© National Radio Forum 

From Washington. 

[9] Vapex Musical Doctors 

Clyde Doerr, Geo. Greer, Chas. Mag- 
nanti; orchestra direction, Milton 
Rettenberg. 

[4] General Electric Hour 
© Hank Simmons' Show Boat 

Old-time melodrama. 

ffl Lucky Strike Dance Orchestra 

Direction, B. A. Rolfe. 

[4] Cuckoo 

Burlesque skit. 

[E] Clara, Lu and Em 

Humorous skit. (First 15 min.) 

[F] Aunt Lulu's Adventures 

Humorous skit. (Second 15 min.) 

[5] Program [E] Followed by [F| 

ffl Lucky Strike Orchestra 
© Hflnk Simmons' Siiow Boat 



Troubadour of the Moon 

Linnle Ross and string trio. Pol- 
ed by 

Henry Busse's Orchestra 

Slumber Music 

Amos V Andy 

Jack Denny and Orchestra 

Cremo Program 

Program A Followed by B 

Royal Canadians 

Direction, Guy Lombardo. 
Ilrnrv Busse's On-licsl vn 





A 

B 

© 

© 



t 15 min.) 



\D\ Little Jack Little 

Songs and patter. (Second 1 .'1 min.) 

® Program [C] Followed by [0 
® Slumber Mttditi 
[g] Slumber: Music 

■i A t 15 ruin.) 



O Lown's Biltmore Orchestra 
[JJ Dance Orchestra 
\2\ Phil Spitalny's Orchestra 
Q Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at the organ, 

ffl Dance Oivlics! rn 

(U Phil Spitdlnjr'a Orchestra 



15 



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WCAU PHILAOEL. 1170 

WFA* 

wip PHILAOEL 610 

wli r* 

vJn PHILAOEL 560 

KDKA PITTSBGH 980 

WCAE PITTSBGH 1220 

WJAS PITTSB'GH 1290 


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*()n Air I'nrt Tim. 



NON-CHAIN PROGRAMS 
:. S. T. Subtract 1 hour for C. S. 

for M. S. T. 
6:00— Ft. Snclling Band, WCCO. 
6:00— Air Juniors, WENR. 
6:30— Hydrox Party, KYW. 
6:30 — Elementary Spanish, WMAQ. 
7:30— Crosley Saturday Night, VT1 \\ . 

VGBS and KQV. 



also 



7:30 — Herald Examiner — drama, KYW. 
7:45— Hal Tnttcn (sport*), WMAQ- 
7:45— Jack Turner, V."I1AS. 
8:00— Adam and Eve, WXYZ. 
B:45— Musical Minutes, WKRC. 
9:00 — Around the Mclodcon, WT4AI . 
9:15— Sports Review, \nilSM. 
9:30— In Brazilian Jungles, W,N 
9:30— Boxing Matches. W'GBS. 



9:30— Scott Furriers' Club, WEAN. 
10:00 Murpliv Minstrels, WIS. 
10:00 — Grand OP Oprv, W§M. 
10:00 — Simm's Singers, WFAA. 

10:30— W.ulr's Cbrt Hnikeri, CK6V. 

10:30 — Market Ihd MiImv Si . PI ,n Iw.nse. W'OR. 
11:00— King Edward Band, \XI\V. 
11:00— Far North Program. KDKA. 
11:20— Hert Louie and Weasel, WON 



11:30— National Barn Dance, WLS. 
I I : (0— Moonbeams, WOR. 
11:30— Wavnc King, KYW. 
12:00— Belle of Old Kentucky, WIIAS. 
12:00 — Dance Music, WMAQ. 
12:15— Around the Town, WBBM. 
12:30— The Doocllesockeri, WI W. 
I to 3— Dance Music, KFWB. 
2:00 — ("ongre-s < lrclicst ra. KYW. 



Page 32 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



April, 1931 



North American Broadcasting Stations 

Stations by Call Letters Revised to March 1, 1931 

(Figures in Parentheses Denote Power Now Used) 



KBGZ 

KBHB 

KBPS 

KBTM 

KCRC 

KCRJ 

KDB 

KDFN 

KDKA 

KDLR 

KDYL 

KECA 

KELW 

KEX 

KFAB 

KFBB 

KFBK 

KFBL 

KFDM 

KFDY 

KFEL 

KFEQ 

KTGQ 

KFH 

KFI 

KFIO 

KFIU 

KFIZ 

KFJB 

KFJF 

KFJI 

KFJM 

KFJR 

KFJY 

KFJZ 

KFKA 

KFKB 

KFKU 

KFLV 

KFLX 

KFMX 

KFNF 

KFOR 

KFOX 

KFPL 

KFPM 

KFPW 

KFPY 

KFQD 

KFQU 

KFQW 

KFRC 

KFRU 

KFSD 

KFSG 

KFUL 

KFUM 

KFUO 

KFUP 

KFVD 

KFVS 

KFWB 

KFWF 

KFWI 

KFXD 

KFXF 

KFXJ 

KFXM 

KFXR 

KFXY 

KFYO 

KFYR 

KGA 

KGAR 

KGB 

KGBU 

KGBX 

KGBZ 

KGCA 

KGCI 

KGCR 

KGCTJ 

KGCX 

KGDA 

KGDE 

KGDM 

KGDY 

KGEF 

KGEK 

KGER 

KGEW 

KGEZ 

KGFF 

KGFG 

KGFI 

KGFJ 

KGFK 

KGFL 

KGFW 

KGFX 

KGGC 

KGGF 

KGGM 

KGHF 

KGHI 

KGHL 

KGIR 

KGIW 

KGIX 

KGIZ 

KGJF 

KGKB 

KGKL 

KGKO 

KGKX 

KGKY 

KGMB 

KGMP 

KGNF 

KGNO 

KGO 

KGRS 

KGU 

KGVO 

KGW 

KGY 

KHJ 

KHQ 

KICK 

KID 

KIDO 

KIT 



York, Neb. (500) _. 930 KJBS 

Kennett, Mo. (250) 1230 KJR 

Portland, Ore. (100) 1420 KLCN 

Paragould, Ark. (100) 1200 KLO 

Enid, Okla. (100) 1370 KLPM 

Jerome, Ariz. (100) 1310 KLRA 

Santa Barbara, Calif. (100)1500 KLS 

Casper, Wyo. (100) 1210 KLX 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (50000) 980 KLZ 

Devil's Lake, N. D. (100)-. 1210 KMA 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah (1000)1290 KMAC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1430 KMBC 

Burbank, Calif. (500) 780 KMCS 

Portland, Ore. (5000) 1180 KMED 

Lincoln, Neb. (5000) 770 KMJ 

Great Palls, Mont. (1000).... 1280 KMLB 

Sacramento, Calif. (100) 1310 KMMJ 

Everett, Wash. (50) 1370 KMO 

Beaumont, Tex. (500) 560 KMOX 

Brookings, S. D. (500) 550 KMPC 

Denver, Col. (500) 920 KMTR 

St. Joseph, Mo. (2500) 680 KNX 

Boone, la. (100) 1310 KOA 

Wichita, Kan. (1000) 1300 KOAC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (5000).. 640 KOB 

Spokane, Wash. (100) 1120 KOCW 

Juneau, Alaska (10) 13110 KOH 

Pond du Lac, Wis. (100)....1420 KOIL 

Marshalltown, la. (250) 1200 KOIN 

Oklahoma City, Okla. (5000)1480 KOL 

Astoria, Ore. (100) 1370 KOMO 

Grand Forks, N. D. (100).... 1370 KONO 

Portland, Ore. (500) —.1300 KOOS 

Fort Dodge, la, (100) 1310 KORE 

Fort Worth, Tex. (100) 1370 KOY 

Greeley, Col. (500) 880 KPCB 

Milford, Kan. (5000) 1050 KPJM 

Lawrence, Kan. (500)..... 1220 KPO 

Rockford, 111. (500) 1410 KPOF 

Galveston, Tex. (100) 1370 KPPC 

Northfield, Minn. (1000) 1250 KPQ 

Shenandoah, la. (500) 890 KPRC 

Lincoln, Neb. (100) 1210 KPSN 

Long Beach, Calif. (1000). .1250 KPWF 

Dublin, Tex. (100) -.1310 KQV 

Greenville, Tex. (15) 1310 KQW 

Ft. Smith, Ark. (50) 1340 KRE 

Spokane, Wash. (1000) 1340 KREG 

Anchorage, Alaska (100).. ..1230 KRGV 

Holy Citv, Calif. (100) 1420 KRLD 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 1420 KRMD 

San Francisco, Calif. (1000) 610 KROW 

Columbia Mo. (1000) 630 KRSC 

San Diego, Calif. (500) 600 KSAC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (500)— 1120 KSCJ 

Galveston, Tex. (500) 1290 KSD 

Colorado Sp'gs, Col. (1000)1270 KSEI 

Clayton, Mo. (500) 550 KSL 

Denver, Col. (100) 1310 KSMR 

Culver City, Calif. (250)....1000 KSO 

Cape Girardeau, Mo. (100). .1210 KSOO 

Hollywood, Calif. (1000).... 950 KSTP 

St. Louis, Mo. (100) 1200 KTAB 

San Francisco, Calif. (500) 930 KTAP 

Nampa, Ida. (50) 1420 KTAR 

Denver, Col. (250) - 920 KTAT 

Edgewater, Col. (50) 1310 KTBI 

S. Bernardino, Calif. (100)1210 KTBR 

Oklahoma City, Okla. (100)1310 KTBS 

Flagstaff, Ariz. (100) 1420 KTFI 

Abilene, Tex. (100)..- 1420 KTHS 

Bismarck, N. D. (1000) 550 KTLC 

Spokane, Wash. (5000) 1470 KTM 

Tucson, Ariz. (100) 1370 KTNT 

San Diego, Calif. (250) 1330 KTRH 

Ketchikan, Alaska (500).... 900 KTSA 

St Joseph, Mo. (100) 1310 KTSL 

York, Neb. (500) 930 KTSM 

Decorah, la. (50) 1270 KTW 

San Antonio, Tex. (100) 1370 KUJ 

Watertown, S. D. (100) 1210 KUOA 

Mandan, N. D. (100) 1200 KUSD 

Wolf Point, Mont. (100)... .1310 KUT 

Mitchell, S. D. (100) 1370 KVI 

Fergus Falls, Minn. (100)... .1200 KVL 

Stockton, Calif. (250) 1100 KVOA 

Huron, S. D. (100) 1200 KVOO 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1300 KVOS 

Yuma, Col. (50) 1200 KWCR 

Long Beach, Calif. (1000)... .1360 KWEA 

Fort Morgan, Col. (100) 1200 KWG 

Kalispell, Mont. (100) 1310 KWJJ 

Alva, Okla. (100) 1420 KWK 

Oklahoma Citv, Okla. (100)1370 KWKC 

Corpus Christi, Tex. (100). .1500 KWKH 

Los Angeles, Calif. (100).. .1200 KWLC 

Moorhead, Minn. (50) 1500 KWSC 

Raton, N. M. (50) 1370 KWWG 

Ravenna, Neb. (100) 1310 KXA 

Pierre, S. D. (200) 580 KXL 

San Francisco, Calif. (100). .1420 KXO 

Coffeyville, Kan. (500) 1010 KXRO 

Albuquerque, N. M. (250).... 1230 KXYZ 

Pueblo, Col. (250) 1320 KYA 

Little Rock, Ark. (100) 1200 KYW 

Billings, Mont 950 KZM 

Butte, Mont. (500) 1360 WAAF 

Trinidad, Col. (100) 1420 WAAM 

Las Vegas, Nev. (100) 1420 WAAT 

Grant Citv, Mo. (100) 1500 WAAW 

Little Rock, Ark. (250) 890 WABC 

Brownwood, Tex. (100) 1500 WABI 

San Angelo, Tex. (100) 1370 WABZ 

Wichita Falls, Tex. (250).... 570 WACO 

Sandpoint, Ida. (100) 1420 WADC 

Scottsbluff, Neb. (100) 1500 WAIU 

Honolulu, Hawaii (500).— .1320 WALR 

Elk Citv, Okla. (100) 1210 WAPI 

North Platte, Neb. (500)....1430 WASH 

Dodge Citv, Kan. (100) 1210 WAWZ 

San Francisco, Calif. (7500) 790 WBAA 

Amarillo, Tex. (1000) ....1410 WBAK 

Honolulu, Hawaii (1000).... 940 WBAL 

Missoula, Mont 1420 WBAP 

Portland, Ore. (1000) 620 WBAX 

Lncev, Wash. (10) 1200 WBBC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000).. 900 WBBM 

Spokane, Wash. (1000) 590 WBBR 

Kod Oak. la. (100) 1420 WBBZ 

Idaho Falls, Ida. (250) 1320 WBCM 

Boise, Ida, (1000) 1250 WBEN 

Yakima, Wash. (50) 1310 WBEO 



San Francisco, Calif. (100)1070 WBGF 

Seattle, Wash. (5000) 970 WBIG 

Blytheville, Ark. (50) 1290 WBIS 

Ogden, Utah (500) 1400 WBMS 

Minot, N. D. (100) 1420 WBNX 

Little Rock, Ark. (1000). ...1390 WBOW 

Oakland, Calif. (250) 1440 WBRC 

Oakland, Calif. (500). 880 WBRE 

Denver, Col. (1000) 560 WBSO 

Shenandoah, la. (500) _. 930 WBT 

San Antonio, Tex 1370 WBTM 

Kansas Citv, Mo. (1000).... 950 WBZ 

Inglewood, Calif 1120 WBZA 

Medford, Ore. (50) 1310 WCAC 

Fresno, Calif. (100) 1210 WCAD 

Monroe, La. (50) 1200 WCAE 

Clav Center, Neb. (1000).... 740 WCAH 

Tacoma, Wash. (500) 860 WCAJ 

St. Louis, Mo. (50000) 1090 WCAL 

Beverly Hills, Calif. (500).. 710 WCAM 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000).. 570 WCAO 

Hollywood, Calif. (5000)....1050 WCAP 

Denver, Col. (12500) 830 WCAT 

Corvallis, Ore. (1000) 550 WCAU 

State College, N. M. (20000)1180 WCAX 

Chickasha, Okla. (250) 1400 WCAZ 

Reno, Nev. (500) 1380 WCBA 

Council Bluffs, la. (1000).... 1260 WCBD 

Portland, Ore. (1000) 940 WCBM 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 1270 WCBS 

Seattle, W r ash. (1000) 920 WCCO 

San Antonio, Tex. (100) 1370 WCDA 

Marshfield, Ore. (100) 1370 WCFL 

Eugene, Ore. (100) _ 1420 WCGU 

Phoenix, Ariz. (1000) 1390 WCHI 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 650 WCKY 

Prescott, Ariz. (100) 1500 WCLB 

San Francisco, Calif. (5000) 680 WCLO 

Denver, Col. (500) 880 WCLS 

Pasadena, Calif. (50) ,....1210 WCMA 

Wenatchee, Wash. (50) 1500 WCOA 

Houston, Tex. (1000) 920 WCOC 

Pasadena, Calif. (1000) 1360 WOOD 

Los Angeles, Calif. (10000)1490 WCOH 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (500) -1380 WCRW 

San Jose, Calif. (500) 1010 WCSC 

Berkeley, Calif. (100) 1370 WCSH 

Santa Ana, Calif. (100) 1500 WDAE 

Harlingen, Tex. (500) 1260 WDAF 

Dallas, Tex. (10000) 1040 WDAG 

Shreveport, La, (50) 1310 WDAH 

Oakland, Calif. (500) 930 WDAY 

Seattle, Wash. (50) 1120 WDBJ 

Manhattan, Kan. (500) 580 WDBO 

Sioux City, la. (1000) 1330 WDEL 

St. Louis, Mo. (500) 550 WDGY 

Pocatello, Ida. (250) 900 WDIX 

Salt Lake City. Utah (5000)1130 WDOD 

Santa Maria, Calif. (100)....1200 WDRC 

Clarinda, la. (500) 1380 WDSTJ 

Sioux Falls, S. D. (2000).... 1110 WDWF 

St. Paul, Minn. (10000) 1460 WDZ 

Oakland, Calif. (1000) 560 WEAF 

San Antonio, Tex. (100)....1420 WEAI 

Phoenix, Ariz. (500) 620 WEAN 

Ft. Worth, Tex. (1000) 1240 WEAO 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1300 WEBC 

Portland, Ore. (500) 1300 WEBQ 

Shreveport, La. (1000) 1450 WEBR 

Twin Falls, Ida. (250) 1320 WEDC 

Hot Springs, Ark. (10000). .1040 WEDH 

Houston, Tex. (100) 1310 WEEI 

Los Angeles, Calif. (500).... 780 WEHC 

Muscatine, la. (5000) -.1170 WEHS 

Houston, Tex. (500) 1120 WEEK 

San Antonio, Tex. (1000). ...1290 WELL 

Shreveport, La. (100) 1310 WENR 

El Paso, Tex. (100) 1310 WEPS 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 1270 WEVD 

Longview, Wash. (100) 1370 WEW 

Fayetteville, Ark. (1000)... .1390 WEXL 

Vermilion, S. D. (500) 890 WFAA 

Austin, Tex. (100) 1500 WFAN 

Tacoma, W T ash. (1000) 760 WFBC 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 1370 WFBE 

Tucson, Ariz. (500) 1260 WFBG 

Tulsa, Okla. (5000) _ 1140 WFBL 

Bellingham, Wash. (100). ...1200 WFBM 

Cedar Rapids, la. (100) 1310 WFBR 

Shreveport, La. (100) 1210 WFDF 

Stockton, Calif. (100) 1200 WFDV 

Portland, Ore. (500) 1060 WFDW 

St. Louis, Mo. (1000) 1350 WFI 

Kansas City, Mo. (100) 1370 WFIW 

Shreveport, La. (10000) 850 WFLA 

Decorah, la. (100) — 1270 WFOX 

Pullman, Wash. (500) 1220 WGAL 

Brownsville, Tex. (500) 1260 WGAR 

Seattle. Wash. (500) 570 WGBB 

Portland, Ore. (100) 1420 WGBC 

El Centro, Calif. (100) 1500 WGBF 

Aberdeen, Wash. (100) 1310 WGBI 

Houston, Tex. (100) 1420 WGBS 

San Francisco, Calif. (1000)1230 WGCM 

Chicago, 111. (10000) 1020 WGCP 

Hayward, Calif. (100) 1370 WGES 

Chicago, ill. (500) 920 WGH 

Newark, N. J. (1000) 1250 WGL 

Jersey City, N. J. (300) 940 WGN 

Omaha, Neb. (500) 660 ' WGR 

New York. N. Y. (5000) 860 WGST 

Bangor, Me. (100) 1200 WGY 

New Orleans, La, (100) 1200 WHA 

Wain. Tex. (1000) 1240 WHAD 

Akron, O. (1000) 1320 WHAM 

Oolumbus, O. (500) 640 WHAP 

Zanesville, O. (100) 1210 WHAS 

Birmingham. Ala. (5000).... 1140 WHAT 

Grand lf;ipids, Mich. (500). 1270 WHAZ 

Xew York City 1350 WHB 

Lafayette, Ind. (500) 1400 WHBC 

Harrisburg, I'a. (500) 1430 WHBD 

Baltimore, Md. (10000) 1060 WHBF 

Ft, Worth. Tex. (50000).... 800 WHBL 

Wilkes-Barre, I'a. (loo) 1210 WHBQ 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (500) 1400 WHBU 

Chicago, 111. (25000) 770 WHBY 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (1000) 1300 WHDF 

Ponca City. Okla. (100) 1200 WHDH 

Bay City, Mich. (500) 1410 WHDI 

RufTalo, N. Y. (1000) 900 WHDL 

Marquette, Mich. (100) 1310 WHBC 



Glenn Falls, N. Y. (50)— .1370 

Greensboro, N. C 1440 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 1230 

Hackensack, N. J. (250). ...1450 

New York City (250) 1350 

Terre Haute, Ind. (100) 1310 

Birmingham, Ala. (500) 930 

W T ilkes-Barre, Pa. (100) 1310 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. (250) 920 

Charlotte, N. C. (25000) 1080 

Danville, Va. (100) 1370 

Springfield, Mass. (15000).. 990 

Boston, Mass. (500) 990 

Storrs, Conn. (250)..._ 600 

Canton, N. Y. (500) 1220 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (1000) 1220 

Columbus, O. (500) -.1430 

Lincoln, Neb. (500) 590 

Northfield, Minn. (1000)....1250 

Camden, N. J. (500) 1280 

Baltimore, Md. (250) 600 

Asbury Park, N. J. (500)....1280 

Rapid City, S. D. (100) 1200 

Philadelphia, Pa. (10000)....1170 

Burlington, Vt. (100) 1200 

Carthage, 111. (50) —.1070 

Allentown, Pa. (250) 1440 

Zion, 111. (5000) 1080 

Baltimore, Md. (100) 1370 

Springfield, 111. (100) 1210 

Minneapolis, Minn. (7500).. 810 

New York City (250) 1350 

Chicago, 111. (1500) _ 970 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (500) 1400 

Chicago, 111 -.1490 

Covington, Kv. (5000) 1490 

Long Beach, N. Y. (100) 1500 

Janesville, Wis. (100) 1200 

Joliet, 111. (100) _ 1310 

Culver, Ind. (500) 1400 

Pensacola, Fla, (500). 1340 

Meridian, Miss. (500) 880 

Harrisburg, Pa. (100) 1200 

Yonkers, N. Y. (100) 1210 

Chicago, 111. (100). 1210 

Charleston, S. C. (500) 1360 

Portland, Me. (1000) 940 

Tampa, Fla. (1000) 1220 

Kansas City, Mo. (1000).... 610 

Amarillo, Tex. (1000) 1410 

El Paso, Tex. (100) 1310 

Fargo, N. D. (1000) 940 

Roanoke, Va. (250) 930 

Orlando, Fla. (500) 1120 

Wilmington, Del. (250) 1120 

Minneapolis, Minn. (1000). .1180 

Tupelo, Miss. (100)— 1500 

Chattanooga, Tenn. (1000). .1280 

Hartford, Conn. (500) 1330 

New Orleans', La. (1000)....1250 

Providence, R. I. (100) 1210 

Tuscola, 111. (100) —.1070 

New York City (50000) 660 

Ithaca, N. Y. (500).— 1270 

Providence, R. I. (250) 780 

Columbus, O. (750).— 570 

Superior, Wis. (1000) 1290 

Harrisburg, 111. (100).— 1210 

Buffalo, N. Y. (100) 1310 

Chicago, 111. (100) —.1210 

Erie, Pa. (100) 1420 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 590 

Emory, Va. (100) 1200 

Evanston, 111. (100) —.1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100).... 1370 
Battle Creek, Mich. (50).... 1420 

Chicago, 111. (50000) 870 

Worcester, Mass (100) 1200 

New York City (500) 1300 

St. Louis, Mo. (1000) 760 

Royal Oak, Mich. (50) 1310 

Dallas, Tex. (50000) 800 

Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 610 

Knoxville, Tenn. (50) 1200 

Cincinnati, O. (100) 1200 

Altoona, Pa. (100) 1310 

Syracuse, N. Y. (1000) 1360 

Indianapolis, Ind. (1000)— 1230 

Baltimore, Md. (500) 1270 

Flint, Mich. (100) 1310 

Rome, Ga. (100) 1370 

Talladega, Ala. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 560 

Hopkinsville, Kv. (1000)— 940 

Clearwater, Fla. (1000) 620 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (250)— 1400 

Lancaster, Pa. (100)— 1310 

Cleveland, O. (500)— 1450 

Freeport, N. Y. (100) 1210 

Memphis, Tenn. (500) 1430 

Evansville, Ind. (500) 630 

Seranton, Pa, (250) 880 

New York City (250) 600 

Gulfport, Miss. (100) 1210 

Newark, N. J. (250) 1250 

Chicago, 111. (500) 1360 

Newport News, Va. (100).... 1310 

Ft, Wavne, Ind. (100) 1370 

Chicago, 111. (25000) 720 

Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) 550 

Atlanta. Ga. (250) 890 

Schenectady, N. Y. (50000) 790 
Madison, Wis. (750) 940 

Milwaukee, Wis. (250) 1120 

Rochester, N. Y. (5000) 1150 

New York Citv (1000) 1300 

Louisville. Kv. (10000) 820 

Philadelphia, Pa, (100) 1310 

Troy, N. Y. (500) 1300 

Kansas Citv, Mo. (500) 860 

Canton, O. (100) 1200 

Mt. Orah, O. (100) 1370 

Rock Island, 111. (100) 1210 

Sheboygan, Wis. (500) 1410 

Memphis, Tenn. (100) 1370 

Anderson. Ind. (100) 1210 

Green Bay, Wis. (100) 1200 

Calumet, Mich. (100) 1370 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 830 

Minneapolis, Minn. (500).... 1180 
Turner Lake, N. Y. (10).. ..1420 
Rochester, N. Y. (500) 1440 



WHFC Cicero, 111. (100) 1420 

WHIS Bluefield, W. Va. (250)..... .1410 

WHK Cleveland, O. (1000) —.1390 

WHN New York City (250) _.1010 

WHO Des Moines, la. (5000) 1000 

WHOM Jersey Citv, N. J. (500) 1450 

WHP Harrisburg, Pa. (500) 1430 

WIAS Ottumwa, la. (100) 1420 

WIBA Madison, Wis. (500) 1280 

WIBG Elkins Park, Pa. (50) 930 

WIBM Jackson, Mich. (100). 1370 

WIBO Chicago, 111. (1000) _ 560 

WIBR Steubenville, O. (50) 1420 

WIBG Poynette, Wis. (100). 1310 

WIBW Topeka, Kan. (1000) 580 

WIBX Utica, N. Y. (100) _ 1200 

WICC Bridgeport, Conn. (500) 1190 

WIL St. Louis, Mo. (100) 1200 

WILL Urbana, 111. (250) _ 890 

WILM Wilmington, Del. (100) 1420 

WIOD Miami Beach, Fla. (1000).... 1300 

WIP Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 610 

WIS Columbia, S. C. (500). 1010 

WISJ Beloit, Wis. (500) 780 

WISN Milwaukee, Wis. (250) 1120 

WJAC Johnstown, Pa. (100). 1310 

WJAG Norfolk, Neb. (1000) 1060 

WJAK Marion, Ind. (50) 1310 

WJAR Providence, R. I. (250) 890 

WJAS Pittsburgh, Pac (1000) 1290 

WJAX Jacksonville. Fla. (1000).... 900 

WJAY Cleveland, O. (500) _ 610 

WJAZ Chicago, 111. (5000) ..._ 1490 

WJBC La Salle, 111. (100) 1200 

WJBI Red Bank, N. J. (100) 1210 

WJBK Detroit, Mich. (50). 1370 

WJBL Decatur, 111. (100) 1200 

WJBO New Orleans, La. (100) 1420 

WJBU Lewisburg, Pa, (100)— 1210 

WJBW New Orleans, La. (30) 1200 

WJBY Gadsden, Ala. (50) 1210 

WJDX Jackson, Miss. (1000)— 1270 

WJJD Mooseheart, 111. (20000) 1130 

WJKS Gary, Ind. (1000) _ 1360 

WJR Detroit, Mich. (5000) 750 

WJSV Alexandria, Va. (10000) 1460 

WJW Mansfield, O. (100)— 1210 

WJZ New York City (30000) 760 

WKAQ San Juan, P. R. (500) 890 

WKAR E. Lansing, Mich. (1000). ...1040 

WKAV Laconia, N. H. (100)— 1310 

WKBB Joliet, 111. (100) _ 1310 

WKBC Birmingham, Ala. (100) 1310 

WKBF Indianapolis, Ind. (500) 1400 

WKBH La Crosse, Wis. (1000) 1380 

WKBI Chicago, 111. (100)— -.1420 

WKBN Youngstown, O. (500). 570 

WKBO Jersey City, N. J. (250) 1450 

WKBS Galesburg, 111. (100) —.1310 

WKBV Connersville, Ind. (100)....1500 

WKBW Buffalo, N. Y. (5000) _.1480 

WKBZ Ludington, Mich. (50) 1500 

WKJC Lancaster, Pa. (100) 1200 

WKRC Cincinnati, O. (500). 550 

WKY Oklahoma City, Okla. (1000) 900 

WKZO Kalamazoo, Mich. (1000).... 590 

WLAC Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 1470 

WLAP Louisville, Ky. (100) 1200 

WLB St. Paul, Minn. (1000) -.1250 

WLBC Muncie, Ind. (50)..._ 1310 

WLBF Kansas Citv, Kan. (100).... 1420 

WLBG Petersburg, Va. (100) 1200 

WLBL Stevens Point, Wis. (2000) 900 

WLBW Oil City, Pa. (500) 1260 

WLBX Long Is. City, N. Y. (100). .1500 

WLBZ Bangor, Me. (500) _ 620 

WLCI Ithaca, N. Y. (50) —.1210 

WLEX Lexington, Mass. (500) 1410 

WLEY Lexington, Mass'. (100) 1370 

WLIT Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 560 

WLOE Boston, Mass. (100) 1500 

WLS Chicago, 111. (5000) — . 870 

WLSI Providence, R. I. (100) 1210 

WLTH Brooklyn, N. Y. (500). 1400 

WLVA Lynchburg, Va. (100)— 1370 

WLW Cincinnati, O. (50000) 700 

WLWL New York City (5000) 1100 

WMAC Syracuse, N. Y. (250) 570 

WMAK Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) -.1040 

WMAL Washington, D. C. (250).... 630 

WMAQ Chicago, 111. (5000)— „. 670 

WMAZ Macon, Ga. (250) _... 890 

WMBA Newport, R. I. (100) 1500 

WMBC Detroit. Mich. (100) 1420 

WMBD Peoria Heights, 111. (500)— 1440 

WMBG Richmond, Va. (100) —.1210 

WMBH Joplin. Mo. (100) —.1420 

WMBI Chicago, 111. (5000) —.1080 

WMBO Auburn. N. Y. (100) —.1310 

WMBQ Brooklyn, N. Y. (100) 1500 

WMBR Tampa, Fla. (100) 1370 

WMC Memphis, Tenn. (500) 780 

WMCA New York City. (500) 570 

WMMN Fairmont. W. Va. (250) 890 

WMPC Lapeer. Mich. (100)— 1500 

WMRJ Jamaica, N. Y. (100) 1210 

WMSG New York Citv (250) 1350 

WMT Waterloo, la. (500)— _. 600 

WNAC Boston, Mass. (1000) 1230 

WNAD Norman. Okla. (500) —.1010 

WNAX Yankton, S. D. (1000) 570 

WNBF Binghamton. N. Y. (100). ...1500 

WNBH New Bedford, Mass. (100)..1310 

WNBO Washington. Pa. (100) 1200 

WNBR Memphis, Tenn. (1000) 1430 

WNBW Carbondale, Pa. (10) 1200 

WNBX Springfield, Vt. (10) 1200 

WNBZ Saranac Lake, N. Y. (50).... 1290 

WNJ Newark, N. J. (250) 1450 

WNOX Knoxville, Tenn. (1000) 560 

WNYC Now York Citv (500) 570 

WOAI San Antonio, Tex. (50000). .1190 

WOAX Trenton. N. J. (500) 1280 

WOBT Union Citv, Tenn. (100) 1310 

WOBTJ Charleston, W. Va. (250).... 580 

WOC Davenport, la. (5000) 1000 

WOCL Jamestown, N. Y. (50) 1210 

WODA Paterson, N. J. (1000) 1250 

WODX Mobile, Ala. (500) 1410 

WOI Ames. la. (5000) 640 

WOKO Albany, N. Y. (500) 1440 

WOL Washington. D. C. (100) 1310 

WOMT Manitowoc. Wis. (100) 1210 

WOOD Grand Rapids. Mich. (500). .1270 

WOPI Bristol. Tenn. (100) 1500 

WOQ Kansas City. Mo. (1000)....1300 

WOR Newark. N. J. (5000) 710 

WORC Worcester, Mass. (100) 1200 

WOS Jefferson Citv. Mo. (500)— 630 

WOV Xew York City (1000) 1130 

WOW Omaha, Neb. '(1000) 590 

WOWO Ft. Wavne. Ind. ( 10000). ...1160 

WPAD Paducati. Kv. (100) 1420 



April. 193] 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 33 



WPAP 

WPAW 

WPCO 

WPCH 

WPEN 

WPG 

WPOE 

WPSC 

WPTP 

WQAM 

WQAN 

WQAO 

WQBC 

WQDM 

WQDX 

WRAP 

WEAK 

WRAW 

WRAX 

WEBI 

WEBJ 

WRBL 

WRBQ 

WRBT 

WRBX 

WRC 

WRDO 

WRDW 

WREC 

WREN 

WRHM 

WRJN 

WRNY 

WROL 

WRR 

WRUY 

WRVA 

WSAI 

WSAJ 

WSAN 

WSAR 

WSAZ 

WSB 

WSBC 

VJSBT 

WSEN 

WSFA 

WSIX 

WSJS 

WSM 

WSMB 

WSMK 

WSOC 

WSPA 

WSPD 



New York Citv (250) 1010 

Pawtucket, R. I. (100) 1210 

Chicago, 111. (500) 560 

New York City (500) 810 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100) 1500 

Atlantic City, N. J. (5000) .1100 

Patchogue, N. Y. (100). 1370 

State College, Pa. (500)....1230 

Raleigh, N. C. (1000) 680 

Miami, Fla. (1000) 560 

Seranton, Pa. (250) 880 

New York City (250) 1010 

Yicksburg, Hiss. (300) 1360 

St. Albans, Vt. (100) 1370 

Thomasville, Ga. (50) 1210 

La Porte, Ind. (100) 1200 

Williamsport, Pa. (100) 1370 

Reading, Pa. (100) 1310 

Philadelphia, Pa. (250) 1020 

Tifton, Ga. (100) _ 1310 

Hattiesburg, Miss. (10) 1370 

Columbus, Ga. (50) 1200 

Greenville, Miss. (100) 1210 

Wilmington, N. C. (100) 1370 

Roanoke, Va. (250)..._ _.1410 

Washington, D. C. (500) 950 

Augusta, Me. (100) 1370 

Augusta. Ga. (100) 1500 

Memphis, Tenn. (500) 600 

Lawrence, Kan. (1000) 122© 

Minneapolis, Minn. (1000). .1250 

Racine, Wis. (100) 1370 

New York Citv (700) 1010 

Knoxville, Tenn. (50) 1310 

Dallas, Tex. (500) 1280 

Gainesville, Fla. (5000) 830 

Richmond, Va. (5000) 1110 

Cincinnati, O. (500) 1330 

Grove Citv, Pa. (100) 1310 

Allentown, Pa. (250). 1440 

Fall River, Mass. (250) 1450 

Huntington, W. Va. (1000) 580 

Atlanta, Ga. (5000) 740 

Chicago. 111. (100) 1210 

South Bend. Ind. (500) 1230 

Columbus, O. (50) 1210 

Montgomery, Ala. (500) 1410 

Springfield, Tenn. (100) 1210 

Winston-Salem, N. C. (100 1 1310 

Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 650 

New Orleans, La. (500) 1320 

Dayton, O. (200) 1380 

Gastonia. N. C 1210 

Spartanburg. S. C. (100)... .1420 
Toledo, O. (500) _.1340 



WSSH 

WSUI 

WSUN 

WSVS 

WSYB 

WSYR 

WTAD 

WTAG 

WTAM 

WTAQ 

WTAR 

WTAW 

WTAX 

WTBO 

WTEL 

WTFI 

WTIC 

WTMJ 

WTNT 

WTOC 

WWAE 

WWJ 

WWL 

WWNC 

WWRL 

WWVA 

WXYZ 



CFAC 

CFBO 

CFCA 

CFCF 

CFCH 

CFCN 

CFCO 

CFCT 

CFCY 

CFJC 

CFLC 

CFNB 

CFQC 

CFRB 

CFRC 

CHCA 

CHCK 

CHCS 

CHCT 

CHGS 

CHLS 

CHMA 

CHML 

CHNS 

CHRC 

CHWC 



Boston, Mass. (500) 1410 

Iowa City, la. (500).. ._ 880 

St. Petersburg, Fla. (1000) 620 

Buffalo. N. Y. (50) 1370 

Rutland, Vt. (100) 1500 

Syracuse, N. Y. (250) 570 

Quincv. 111. (500) 1440 

Worcester, Mass. (250) 580 

Cleveland, O. (50000) 1070 

Eau Claire, Wis. (1000) 1330 

Norfolk, Va. (500) 780 

College Station, Tex. (500)1120 

Streator, 111. (50) 1210 

Cumberland, Md. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa 1310 

Toccoa, Ga. (500) 1450 

Hartford, Conn. (50000) 1060 

Milwaukee, Wis. (1000) 620 

Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 1470 

Savannah, Ga. (500) 1260 

Hammond, Ind. (100) 1200 

Detroit. Mich. (1000) 920 

New Orleans, La. (5000).... 850 

Asheville, N. C. (1000) 570 

Woodside, N. Y. (100) 1500 

Wheeling, W. Va. (5000) ....1160 
Detroit, Mich. (1000) 1240 

CANADIAN STATIONS 

Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

St. John, N. B. (50) 890 

Toronto, Ont. (500) 840 

Montreal, Que. (500) 1030 

Iroquois Falls, Ont. (250).... 600 

Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

Chatham, Ont. (100) 1210 

Victoria, B. C. (500) 630 

Charlottetown, P. E. 1.(250) 960 

Kamloops, B. C. (15) 1120 

Prescott. Ont. (50) 1010 

Frederickton, N. B. (50). ...1210 

Saskatoon. Sask. (500) 910 

Toronto, Ont. (4000) 960 

Kingston, Ont. (500) 930 

Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

Charlottetown, P. E. I. (30) 960 

Hamilton, Ont. (10) 880 

Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

Summerside, P. E. I (100). .1120 

Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

Edmonton, Alta. (250) 680 

Hamilton. Ont (50) 880 

Halifax, N. S. (500) 910 

Quebec, Que. (100) _. 880 

Regina, Sask. (500) 960 



CHWK Chilliwack, B. C. (5) 1210 

CHYC Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

CJBR Regina. Sask. (500) 960 

CJCA Edmonton, Alta. (500) 930 

CJCB Sydney, N. S. (50) 880 

CJCJ Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

CJGC London, Ont. (500) 910 

CJGX Yorkton. Sask. (500) 630 

CJOC Lethbridge, Alta. (50) 1120 

CJOR Sea Island, B. C. (50) 1210 

CJRM Moose Jaw, Sask. (500) 600 

CJRW Fleming, Sask. (500)... 600 

CJSC Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 

CKAC Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

CKCD Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

CKCI Quebec, Que. (22%) 880 

CKCK Regina. Sask. (500) 960 

CKCL Toronto, Ont. (500) 580 

CKCO Ottawa, Ont. (100) 890 

CKCR Waterloo, Ont. (50) 1010 

CKCV Quebec, Que. (50) 880 

CKFC Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

CKGW Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 

CKIC Wolfville, N. S. (50) 930 

CKLC Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

CKMC Cobalt, Ont. (15) 1210 

CKMO Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

CKNC Toronto, Ont. (500) 580 

CKOC Hamilton, Ont. (50) 1120 

CKPC Preston, Ont. (25) 1210 

CKPR Midland. Ont. (50) 930 

CKTJA Edmonton, Alta. (500) . 580 

CKWX Vancouver, B. C. (100) 730 

CKX Brandon, Man. (500) 540 

CKY Winnipeg, Man. (5000) 780 

CNRA Moncton, N. B. (500) 630 

CNRC Calgarv, Alta. (500) 690 

CNRD Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

CNRE Edmonton, Alta. (500) 930 

CNRH Halifax, N. S. (500) 910 

CNRL London, Ont. (500) 910 

CNRM Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

CNRO Ottawa, Ont. (500)....- 600 

CNRQ Quebec, Que. (50) 880 

CNRR Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

CNRS Saskatoon. Sask. (500) 910 

CNRT Toronto, Ont. (500) 840 

CNRV Vancouver, B. C. (500) 1030 

CNRW Winnipeg, Man. (5000) 780 

CNRX Toronto, Ont. (4000) 960 

CPRY Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 

CUBA 

CMHD Caibarien (250) _ 923 

CMHA Cienfuegos (200) 1154 



CMGA 

CMBC 

CMBD 

CMBG 

CMBS 

CMBT 

CMBW 

CMBY 

CMBZ 

CMC 

CMCA 

CMCB 

CMCF 

CMCJ 

CMCN 

CMCO 

CMCQ 

CMCX 

CMK 

CMQ 

CMW 

CMX 

CMKC 

CMKE 

CMKH 

CMHC 



HHK 



XFC 

XFF 

XEA 

XEJ 

XEQ 

XEP 

XEY 

XEB 

XEFA 

XEG 

XEN 

XEO 

XETA 

XEX 

XEW 

XEZ 

XFG 

XFI 

XFX 

XET 

XED 

XFM 

XES 

XETF 



Colon (100) 834 

Havana (150) 1130 

Havana (150) _... 955 

Santiago de las Vegas (150)1070 

Havana (150) 790 

Havana (150) 1070 

Havana (150) 1010 

Marianac (100) 1405 

Havana (150) _ 1010 

Havana (500) 845 

Havana (150) 1225 

Havana (150) 1070 

Havana (250) ..._ 900 

Havana (250) 55t0 

Havana (250) 1225 

Marianao (250) 660 

Havana (600) 955 

Havana (250) 1010 

Havana (3000) 730 

Havana (250) 1130 

Havana (700) 600 

Havana (500) 900 

Santiago de Cuba (150) 1304 

Santiago (250) 1250 

Santiago (250) 1327 

Tuinucu (500) 791 

HAITI 

Port au Prince (1000) 920 

MEXICO 

Ajuas Calientes (350) _... 805 

Chihuahua (250) 915 

Gaudaljara (100) 1000 

Juarez (100) 1000 

Juarez (1000) 750 

Laredo (2500) 1430 

Merida (100) 1000 

Mexico Citv (1000) 1030 

Mexico Citv (250) 1250 

Mexico Citv (2000) 840 

Mexico Citv (1000) 719 

Mexico Citv (5000) 940 

Mexico Citv (500) 1140 

Mexico City (500) 1210 

Mexico Citv (5000) 780 

Mexico Citv (500) 588 

Mexico Citv (2000) 638 

Mexico Citv (1000) _... 818 

Mexico Citv (500) 860 

Monterrev (500) 1000 

Reynosa (10000) 975 

Tampico (500) 730 

Tampico (500) _... 890 

Vera Cruz (500) 680 



ALABAMA 

{Birmingham. WAPI, 1140. 
Birmingham, WBRC, 930. 
Birmingham. WKBC. 1310. 
Gadsden, WJBY. 1210. 
Mobile. WODX. 1410. 
Montgomery. WSFA. 1410. 
ralladega. WFDW. 1420. 

ARIZONA 

Flagstaff. KFXY. 1420. 
lerome. KCB.J. 1310. 
Phoenix, KOY. 1390. 
Phtenlx, KTAR. 820. 
Prescott. KPJM, 1500. 
Tucson. KGAR. 1370. 
Tucson. KVOA, 1260. 

ARKANSAS 

{Hayettevllle. KUOA. 1390. 
IHot Springs. KTHS. 1040. 
Mule Rock. KOHI. 1200. 
Utile Hock. KGJF. 890. 
JLIttle Rock. KLRA. 1390. 
Paragould. KBTM, 1200. 

CALIFORNIA 

Hills. KMPC. 710. 
Burbank. KELW, 78 0. 
Culvef City, kkvd. 1000, 
■BOUrwood, KFWB. 950. 
Hollywood. KMTIt, 570. 
tnglewood. KMCS. 1120. 
[Long Beach. KFOX, 1230. 
[Long Beach, KGER, 1380 
(Los Angel I, KECA, 1 130. 
KFI. 640. 

Us Ang'les. KFSO. 1120. 

!Us Angeles. KGEF, 1300. 
IL01 Angelas. KIM. Son 
(ton Angeles. KNX. 1050. 

Los Angeles, KTBI, 1300. 

li lei. KTM, 780. 
Jaklanrf KROW. 930. 
(Oakland. KGO. 790. 
Jakland. KI.S. Mm. 

lal land, KJ X. 810 
JOakland. KTAI!. 560. 
(Pasadena. KPSN. 1360. 
4an Diego. KF8D, 600. 
gfl. KCH 1330. 
ISan Francisco. KFRC. 610. 
-oin Krand.co. KFW'I. 930. 
(Man Francisco. KPO. 680. 
ISan Francisco. KYA. 1230. 
■fan Joae. KQ.W. 10 10. 
n, Kgdm. lloo. 

COLORADO 

(Colorado Springs, KFUM. 1270. 

Denver. KFKL. 920 

Dfovef, KFIP. 1310. 

Denver. KFXF. 920. 

S Denver, KLZ. 50 

■Denver, KOA. 830. 

Denver, kpof. 880. 

1 OH Morgan. KGEW. 1200. 

Oreeley, KFKA, 880. 

m. KFHA. 1200. 
Pueblo. KOHF. 132 
Trlnldnd. KC.IW. 1120. 

CONNECTICUT 

Bridgeport, wti 1 1 ino. 
IHartioid, wtic, loso. 
Ilirtford, White. 1330. 
Slofrs, VVC IC, 900. 

DELAWARE 

Wilmington. WDEL. 1120. 
Wilmington. WILM. 1420. 

DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 

Washington. WMAL. 630. 
Washington, WOL. 13 10. 
Washington. WRC. 950. 

FLORIDA 

{Clearwater. WF7.A. 620. 
{Gainesville, win K, S30. 
Jacksonville, wjax. BOO 
SMI. m, I. WIQAM, 500. 
SMiaml Beach, WIOD, 11 



Stations Classified by States 

Only U. S. A. Stations of 100 Watts or More Are Included in This Tabulation. 
Classification by Kilocycles Next Issue. § Indicates Power of 1000 Watts or More. 



Orlando. WDBO. 1120. 
Pennsa-ola. WCOA. 13 40. 
5St. Petersburg. WSUN, 620. 
{Tampa, WDAE, 1220. 
Tampa. WMBR. 1370. 

GEORGIA 

Atlanta. WGST, 890. 
SAtlanta. WSB, 740. 
Augusta. WBDW. 1300. 
Macon, WMAZ. 890. 
Savannah. WTOC. 1260. 
Tifton. WRBI. 1310. 
Toccoa, WTFI, 1450. 

IDAHO 
{Boise, K1DO. 1230. 
Idaho Falls. KID. 1320. 
Pocatcllo. KSEI, 900. 
Sand Point. KGKX, 1420. 
Twin Falls, KTF1, 1320. 

ILLINOIS 
{Chicago. KFKX. 1020. 
JChlcago. KYW. 1020. 
Chicago, WAAF. 920. 
{Chicago. WBBM, 770. 
{Chicago. WCFL, 970. 
1 hlcag 1, VVCR W, 1210. 
WEDO, 1210. 
JChlcago, WENR, 8 7". 
Chicago. WOES, 1360. 
ICblclgO, WON. 720. 

go, WIBO. 360. 
JChlcago. WCHI, 1490. 
JChlcago, WJJD. 1130. 
Chicago, WKHt, 1420. 

!( BicsgO, WLS. 870. 
Chicago. W.MAQ, 670. 
Chicago. W.MB1. 1080. 
1 hicago, wpcc. 560. 
1 hicago, WSBC, 1210. 
Cicero (Evanston). WEHS. 1420. 
Cicero, WIIFC, 142 0. 
Decatur, W.IBL. 1200. 
Galesburg. WKB8, 1310. 
Harrlsburg. WKBij. 1210. 
Jollct. WCLS. 1310. 
Jollct. WKIIB. [310. 
I.a Salle. WJBC. 1200. 
Peoria, WMBD, 14 40. 
Oulncy. WTAD. 14 40. 
Kockford. KFLV. I I In 
Rock Island. Will;!. 1 2 10 
Springfield. WCBS. 1210 
BpHngflelft WTAX. 1210. 
Tuscola. WT)Z. 1 n 7o. 
Irbana. WILL. 890. 
IfflOn, WCBD, 1080. 

INDIANA 

Anderson. WHBU. 1210. 
1 oflnersvllle. WKBV. 1500. 
Culver, wtma. 1400. 
Evan vllle, WOBF, B 10 
Fori Wayne. wi;i, 1:170. 

SFort Wayne. WOWO. 1100. 
>!iifv. W.1KR. 1360. 
I, WWAE 1200. 
•Indianapolis. WFBM. 1230. 
In.li.innp.ills. WKBF, 1 100 
f.afayette. WBAA. 1100 
I.a Porte. W'RAF. linn 
South Ben. I. vySBT. 11 10 
Tcrrc Haute. WHOW. 1310 

IOWA 
JAmcs, WOI. 640. 
Boorlc. KFGQ. 1310. 
Cedar BapHs. KWCH. 1310 
Darin. la. KSO, l:flo. 
ICouncIl Rluffi. KOIL. 1200. 
[Davenport, woe. 1000. 
Decorah, KWLC 1270. 
Dl Moines. WHO, loon. 
I DM Dodge, KFJY. 1310 
Iowa City, wsn. ISO 



Marshalltown. KF.IB. 1200. 
{Muscatine, KTNT. 1170. 
Ottumwa, W1AS, 142 0. 
Red Oak, KICK, 1420. 
Shenandoah. KFNF. 890. 
Shenandoah. KMA. 930. 
{Sioux City. KSCJ. 1330. 
Waterloo, WMT, 600. 

KANSAS 
Dodge City. KGNO. 1210. 
Kansas City. W1,BF. 1420. 
{Lawrence, WREN. 122 0. 
Lawrence, WHEN. 1220. 
.M-"i-ilian. r."SAC. 580. 
{Milford, KFKB. 1050. 
{Topeka. WIBW, 580. 
{Wichita, KFH. 1300. 

KENTUCKY 
{Covington. WCKY. 14 90. 
{Hopkinsvllle. WFIW. 940. 
{Louisville. WHAS. 820. 
Louisville, WLAP. 1200. 
Paducah. WPAD. 1420. 

LOUISIANA 

New Orleans. WJBW. 1200. 
N-w Orl-ans. WAB5!. 1200. 
8Ncw Orleans, WDSU. 1250. 
New Orleans, WJBO. 1420. 
NCCT Orleans. WSMB , 1320. 
{New Orleans, WWL. 850. 
{Shroveport. KTBS, 1450. 
Shreveport. KTSL, 1310. 
Shreveport. kwf.a. 1210. 
I Shreveport, KWKH. 850. 

MAINE 

Augusta. WBDO. 1370. 
Bangor. WABI. 1200 
Bancjor. WI.BZ. 620. 
SPortland. WCSH. 940. 

MARYLAND 

{Baltimore. WBAL. 1060. 

Hall itO, WCAO. BOO 

Baltimore, WCBM, 1370 
Baltimore, W'FiiR. 1270. 
Cirmberland. WT20, 1420. 

MASSACHUSETTS 

JBoslon. WItIS, 1230. 
{Boston, WBZ WBZA, 990. 
jltoMon. WEEI. 500. 
\' r OE I '.00. 

• Boston. WNAC, 1230. 

vVSSH. 1410. 
Fall Itl-.rr. WSAR, 1450. 

• Gloucester. WUDII. 830. 
Lexington, w I.KX. 1410. 

1370. 
Now BMrord, WNBH. 1310, 
South Dartmouth, WMAF. 1410. 

ter. woitr WEPS, 1200. 
Worcester. WTAO, 380. 

MICHIGAN 

v. WB( M. Mill 
Kalamazoo. W'KZO, 590. 
calumet. WI1DF. 13 70 
SDetrolt. WXYZ. 1240. 
W.1R. 750. 
i w MB< . I 120 
I Detroit, WWJ, 020. 

.-, UK \It. 10 10. 

Flint. WPD 

Grand Rapitis. wash. 1270. 
WOOD. 12 70. 
Jackson. WIBM. 1370, 
• W.MI'C. 1300 
Me. WBEO, 1310. 

MINNESOTA 
Duluth WBBC, 1 



FerKus Falls. KCDE. 1200. 
{Minneapolis, WCCO. 810. 
{Minneapolis. WDGY, 1180. 
Minneapolis. WHDI. 1180. 
SMinneapolis, WLB-WGMS, 1250. 
{Minneapolis. WRHM. 1250. 
?Northfleld, KFMX, 1250. 
{Northfleld, WCAL. 1250. 
{St. Paul, KSTP, 1460. 

MISSISSIPPI 

Greenville. WRBQ. 1210. 
Gulfnort, WGCM. 1210. 
{Jackson. WJDX, 1270. 
Meridian. WCOC. 880. 
Vicksburg WOBC. 1360. 
Tupelo, WDLX, 1500. 

MISSOURI 

Gape Girardeau. KFVS, 1210. 
Columhia. KFRU. 630. 
Jefferson City, WOS. 630. 
Innlln, WMB1I. 1420. 
{Kansas City, KMBC. !r50. 
K-nsas Citv. KWKC, 1370. 
{Kansas City. WDAF. 610. 
K-nsas City. WIIB. 800. 
{Kansas City. WOQ. 1300. 
§St. Joseph, KFEQ, 680. 
St. Joseph. KGBX, 1310. 
St Louis. KFWF, I'ioo. 
{St. I-ouls. KMOX. 1090. 
St. I.'tlls. KS1) 550. 
{St. Louis. KWK. 1350. 
{St. Louis. WEW. 760. 
St. I.ouls. W1L. 1200. 

MONTANA 
{Billings. KOHL. 950. 
Butte. KGIR. 1360. 
SGreat Falls. KFBB, 1280. 
Kallspoll. KOEZ. 1310. 
Wolf Point. KGCX. 1310. 
Mlssoulo. KOTO. 1420. 

NEBRASKA 

{Clay Center. KMMJ. 740. 
{Lincoln. KFAB. 7 70. 
Lincoln, KFOR. 1210. 
Lincoln. WCAJ, r.'.m 

Norfolk. WJAG 1 

{Norfolk. WJAG. 1060. 

W \ \\\. oho. 
{Omaha, WOW. 590. 
Rav nna. Kgkw. 1310. 

Scottsbliirr, KGKY. 1500. 
York. KOBZ. 930. 

NEVADA 
las. ki;ix 1 110. 
Reno, KOU. 1380. 

NEW HAMPSHIRE 
l.nconla. W'KAV. 1310. 

NEW JERSEY 

v l.nrv I'.irk. WCAP, I2K0 
{Atlantic City, WPG. 1100. 
Wl AM 1280. 
tVBMS I 150 
I, WPCH. 810. 

Jersey citv. waat. oto 

( l< v. WHOM. 1450. 
Jersey Citv iviilio, 1450. 
{Newark. WAAM. 1250. 
Newark. WOCP. 1250. 
N'ewark. WNJ. 1450. 
{Newark. WOB. 710. 
P«ll*atle. WOAO. loin 
SPaterson, WODA. 1250. 
R.d Bank. W.IISI. 1210. 
Trenton. WO AX. 12 80. 

NEW MEXICO 

UbuqUernue, KGOM. 1230 

1 lege, KOB. UNO 



NEW YORK 

Auburn, W'MBO, 1310. 
Albany, WOKu 1440. 
Bingbamton. WNBF. 1500. 
Brooklyn, WBBC. 1400. 
{Brooklyn. WBBR, 1300. 
Brooklyn, WLTH, 1400. 
Brooklyn, WMBQ, 1500. 
Brooklyn, WSGH, 1400. 
Brooklyn, WFOX. 1400. 
gBuiralo, WBEN, 900. 
Buffalo, WKBK, 1310. 
{Buffalo, WGR, 550. 
{Buffalo. WKBW. 1480. 
{Buffalo, W.MAK. 1040. 
Canton. WiAU. 1220. 
Conoy Island. WCQU, 1400. 
Freeport, WGBB, 1210. 
{Ithaca, WEAI. 12 70. 
Jamaica. W.MK.I, 1210. 
Long Beach, WCI.B. 1500. 
Long Island. WI.1IX. 1500 
{New York City. WABC, 880. 
Nou York City. WBNY. 1350. 
New York City, WCDA, 1350. 
{New York City, WEAI . 660 
New York Citv. WGBS 600 
{New York City. WHAP, 1300. 
{Now York City. WH.N I n 1 it. 
{New York City. WJZ, 760. 
{New York City, Wl.W'L, 1100. 
New York City. WMCA, 570 
New York City. WMSG, 1350. 
New York City, W'N'Vc. 570. 
SNen York City, WOV, 1130. 
New York City, WPAP, loin. 
New York Citv. WRNY, 1010. 

Pachogue, WPOE 1370. 
•Rochester, WHAM, 1150. 

ter, WHEC 1 1 10. 
{Schenectady. WGY. 790. 
{Syracuse. WFBL. 1 30(1. 
Syracuse, WSYR, 570. 
Troy, WHAZ, 1300. 
rtlca, WII1X. 1200. 
Woodhaven. WEVD, 1300. 

W Islde, wwrl. 1500. 

Yonkers, WCOH, 12 1 11. 

NORTH CAROLINA 

" \ h.vllle. WWN C, 570. 
{Charlolle. WBT. in so 
ftastoni.i. WSOC, 1210 
Grconsbnrn. WHIG. 1440. 
{Raleigh, Wl'TF, 680. 
Wilmington. WKHT. 1370 
Winston Salem. WSJS. 1310. 

NORTH DAKOTA 
{Bismarck. WFYH. 550. 
I >,v II > Lake KDI.rt. 1210 
{Fargo, WDAY. 010. 
Grand Forks. KPJM, 1370. 

KOI 1 I I 

KI.I'.M. 1120. 

OHIO 

{Akron. WADC, 1330 

tl v '.'1.0 

{Cincinnati. WKlli . 
{Cincinnati. WLW. 700, 
Cincinnati, w U 1330 
{Cleveland, WIIK. 13D0. 
< leveland, WJ \\ 6 1 
{Cleveland. WTAM. 1070. 
Cleveland. WOAH, I 150. 

f>UI. WA1U. 640. 
Columbus. WCAH, 1430. 
Columbus. WEAO, 
Columbun. WSEN, 1210. 
Dayton. WSMK. I. ISO. 
Mansflelrl. WJW 1210 

W'MIHI. I.i70 
Toledo. W8PD. 

town, WKi'.N. 570 
lie. WM.lt 1210 



OKLAHOMA 
Shawnee, KGFF, 1420. 
Chickasha. KOCW. 140n. 
Enid. KCRC. 1370. 
Norman. WNAD. 1010. 
^Oklahoma City. KFJF. 1480. 
Oklahoma City. KFXR. 1310 
Oklahoma City, KGFQ. 1370 
{Oklahoma City, WKY, 900. 
So. ColTeyville. KGGF, 1010. 
Ponca City W'BBZ. 1200. 
{Tulsa, KVOO, 1140. 

OREGON 
{Corvallis. KOAC. 550. 
F.ugenc. KOHE, 1420. 
{Portland. KEX, 1180. 
P rtland KFJR 1300. 
{Portland, KOW. 020. 
^Portland. KOIN. 340, 
Portland, KTBR. 1300, 
Portland. KW.1.1. 1000. 

PENNSYLVANIA 
Ulentown, wcba. 1 1 10, 
Allentown, wsan. 1 1 in 

i 1, WFBG. 1310 
Grove City, WSAJ, 13 10 
Harrisburg, whak. i 130 
Hani burs WCOD, 1200. 
Harrisburg, will'. 1430, 
Johnstown. WJ \< . 1 I" 
Lancaster. WCAL. 1310. 
ter WKJC. 1200. 
I.ewisburg, W.IBH. 12 1 11 
Oil City Wl.ltW. 1200. 
{Philadelphia. WCAU, 1170. 
PhUad Iphla, WELK, 1370. 
Philadelphia, WFAN, 610. 
Philadelphia, Wl-'l. i60 
l'liil.1.1 Iphla, WHAT, 1310. 
Philadelphia. WII'. 010. 

phla, WLIT, 660. 
Phlla.h Iphla. WPEN, 1500. 
Phlladi Ipl . WRAX, 1020 
{Pittsburgh. K1)KA. 980. 
Pittsburgh M'V 1380 
JPIttsburg, WCAE. 1220. 
{Pittsburgh. W.IAS. 1290. 

Seranton, WOBI, 880. 
Seranton. WQAN. 880. 

WP8C, 1230. 
Washington, wnbo, 1300 
win.. Barre, wha.y. 1210 
Wilkes-Barre, WBRB, 1810 

RHODE ISLAND 
. ram ti n WDWP, 1 3 10 
Newport, WMBA, 1500 
Pawlu ket, \n PAW, 1210 

ice, WEAN rSO 

ce, W'JAB, 

1 i 1 

SOUTH CAROLINA 
Charleston, wese, noo 

bl . WIS 1" I". 
ri msburg, wsi-a. 1420. 

SOUTH DAKOTA 

I 
Mitchell KDOA, 18T0, 
Pierre KOFX 

■ u WCAT 1200 
{Slou\ 1 alls. KSOO. IN" 
( ormlllli n Kl SD, 800 
1, KOI It. I2|ii 
Ion. wnax. 570. 
QDY, 1200. 

TENNESSEE 
Bristol. WOPI, I. no. 

WDOl). 1280. 
. « NUX. 560. 
Knoxvtlli WBOL, 1310. 
Lawrcnccburg, WOAN. 600 

QBC, 1430. 
Mcmplll \MIBQ. 1370. 
, his, WMC, 780. 
, wNr.it. 1430. 
BEC, 000. 
jNeshvllle, w M, 6 iO 

, WLAC, 1470, 

le, WTNT. 1 170 

Springfield, wsix. pjin 

Cllj WOBT, 1310 



Page 34 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



April. 1931 



WAVE-LENGTH GUIDE 



NATIONAL 

BROADCASTING 

STATION 


COLUMBIA 

BROADCASTING 

STATION 


1 
KYC 


<• 

<*• 

<• 
<• 
<• 

■<• 

<■ 
-* 
-<■ 
<• 
<■ 
<• 

<- 

■<!■ 

<• 

<• 

<■ 

■<? 
<■ 
■<• 
■<• 
<■ 
<• 

<• 

<• 
<■ 
■<• 
<• 
■<• 
■<• 

<- 

<- 


STATIONS HEARD 

IN MARCH 

(Or Dial Readings) 


KSD-KFYR 


WGR-WKRC 


550 




WFI-WIBO-WLIT 


KLZ-WQAM 


560 






WKBN WNAX-WWNC 


570 




WTAG 


WIBW 


580 




WEEI-WOW-KHQ 




590 




KFSD 


WCAO-WMT-WREC 


600 




WDAF 


WFAN-KFRC 


610 




WFLA- WS UN- WTM J 
KGW-KTAR 


WLBZ 


620 






WMAL 


630 




KFI 


WAIU 


640 




WSM 




650 




WEAF 




660 






WMAQ 


670 




KPO-WPTF 




680 




CKGW 




690 




WLW 




700 




WGN 




720 






CKAC 


730 




WSB 




740 




WJR 




750 




WJZ 


KVI 


760 




KFAB 


WBBM 


770 




WMC 


WEAN-WTAR 


780 




WGY-KGO 




790 




WFAA-WBAP 




800 






WCCO 


810 




WHAS 




820 




KOA 




830 






WABC 


860 




WENR-WLS 




870 




WJAR 


WGST 


890 




WBEN-WJAX-WKY 


KHJ 


900 




KPRC-KOMO-WWJ 




920 






WBRC-WDBJ 


930 




WCSH-WDAY 


KOIN 


940 


• 


WRC 


KMBC 


950 






CFRB 


960 




WCFL 




970 




KDKA 




980 




WBZ 




990 




WHO-WOC 




1000 




KYW 




1020 




CFCF 




1030 




KTHS 


KRLD 


1040 




WBAL-WTIC 




1060 




WTAM 




1070 






WBT 


1080 






KMOX 


1090 






WPG 


1100 




WRVA 




1110 






KTRH-WDBO-WISN 


1120 




KSL 


WJJD 


1130 




KVOO-WAPI 




1140 




WHAM 




1150 






WOWO 


1160 
1170 






WCAU 




WOAI 




1190 






WORC 


1200 




WCAE-WREN 


WDAE 


1220 






WFBM-WNAC 


1230 
1240 






WXYZ-WACO 






WDSU 


1250 






KOIL-WLBW-WTOC 


1260 
1270 




WJDX 


KOL 






WDOD-WRR 


1280 
1290 
1300 
1320 
1330 
1340 
1350 
1360 




WEBC 


KDYL-KTSA-WJAS 




WIOD 


KFH 




WSMB 


WADC 




WSAI 


KSCJ-WTAQ 






WSPD-KFPY 




KWK 








WFBL 






KLRA-WHK 


1390 






WBCM 


1410 




KECA 


WCAH-WHP 


1430 






WHEC-WOKO 


1440 




WGAR 




1450 
1460 
1470 
1480 




KSTP 








WLAC 






KFJF-WKBW 




WCKY 




1490 





TEXAS 
Abilene. KFYO. 1420. 
lAmarillo, KGRS, 1410. 
Amarillo. WDAG, 1410. 
Austin. KUT. 1500. 
Beaumont, KFDM. 560. 
Brownsville, KWWG, 1260. 
Brownwood. KGKB, 1500. 
College Station, WTAW. 1120. 
Corpus Christl. KGFI. 1500. 
s'Dallas. KRLD, 1040. 
§Dallas, WFAA, 800. 
Dallas. WRK. 1280. 
Dublin, KFPL. 1310. 
El Paso. WDAH. 1310. 
El Paso, KTSM, 1310. 
Fort Worth. KFJZ. 1370. 
§Fort Worth, KTAT, 1240. 
§Fort Worth, WBAP, 800. 
Galveston. KFLX. 1370. 
Galveston, KFUL, 1290. 
Harlingen, KRGV, 1260. 
§Houston, KPKC, 920. 
Houston, KTLC, 1310. 
Houston, KTRH, 1120. 
Houston, KXYZ, 1420. 
San Angelo. KGKL, 1370. 
San Antonio, KONO, 1370. 
San Antonio. KTAP, 1420. 
§San Antonio, KTSA, 1290. 
§San Antonio. WOAI, 1190. 
§Waco. WACO, 1240. 
Wichita Falls. KGKO, 570. 



UTAH 
Ogden. KLO. 1400. 
§Salt Lake City, KDYL. 1290 
gSalt Lake City, KSL, 1130. 

VERMONT 

Burlington. WCAX, 1200. 
Rutland. WSYB, 1500. 
St. Albans, WQDM. 13 70. 

VIRGINIA 
Alexandria, WJSV, 1460. 
Danville. WBTM. 1370. 
Emory, WEHC. 1200. 
Lynchburg, WLVA. 1370. 
Newport News. WGH, 1310. 
Norfolk. WTAR, 780. 
Petersburg, WLBG, 1200. 
Richmond. WBBL, 1210. 
Richmond. WMBG, 1210. 
ijRichmond. WRVA. 1110. 
Roanoke, WDBJ, 930. 
Roanoke WRBX. 1410. 
Roanoke, WRBX, 1410. 

WASHINGTON 

SPullman. KWSC. 1220. 
gSeattle, K.IR. (170. 
gSeattle, KOL. 1270. 
SSeattle, KOMO. 920. 
SSeattle, KTW, 1270. 



Seattle, KXA. 570. 
SSpokane. KFPY, 1340. 
§ Spokane. KG A. 1470. 
SSpokane, KHQ, 590. 
Tacoma. KMO, 860. 
§Tacoma, KVI, 760. 

WEST VIRGINIA 

Bluefleld. WHIS, 1420. ' 
Charleston, WOBU. 580. 
Fairmont. WMMN, 890. 
Huntington, WSAZ, 580. 
§Wheeling, WWVA, 1160. 

WISCONSIN 

Madison, WISJ. 780. 
§Eair Claire, WTAQ, 1330. 
Fond du Lac, KFIZ. 1420. 
Janesville, WCLO. 1200. 
§La Crosse. WKBH, 1380. 
Madison, WHA, 940. 
Madison. WIBA. 1280. 
Manitowoc. WOMT, 1210. 
Milwaukee. WHAD. 1120. 
Milwaukee, WISN. 1120. 
^Milwaukee. WTMJ. 620. 
Poynette, WIBU, 1310. 
Racine, WR.IN. 1370. 
Sheboygan. WHBL. 1410. 
SStevens Point. WLBL. 900. 
SSuperior, WEBC, 1290. 
Green Bay, WHBY, 1200. 



WYOMING 
Casper, KDFN, 1210. 

ALASKA 
Anchorage, KFQD. 1230. 
Ketchikan, KGBU, 900. 

HAWAII 
Honolulu. KGMB, 1320. 
Hololulu, KGU, 940. 

PORTO RICO 

San Juan. WKAQ, 890. 

CUBA 

Havana, CMC. 840. 
Havana. CMI, 820. 
Havana. CMK. 1100. 
Havana, CMW, 60 0. 

CANADA 

Red River, Alta., CNRD. 840. 
Winnipeg, Man*. CKY. 780. 
Winnipeg. Man.. CNRW. 780. 
Toronto, Ont.. CFRB. 960. 
Toronto, Ont, CHRY. 690. 
Toronto. Ont., CKGW, 690. 
Toronto, Ont.. CNRX. 690. 
Montreal, Que., CHYC. 730. 
Montreal. Que.. CKAC. 730. 
Montreal. Que., CNBM, 730. 



po^ar%nhg^ms 



Atwater-Kent. NBC, Sun. 9:15. 
Around the Samovar, CBS, Sat. S. 

A. & P. Gypsies, NBC, Mon. 8:30. 
Armour Program. NBC, Fri. 9:30. 
Armstrong Quakers. NBC, Fri. 10. 

An Evening in Paris, CBS, Mon. 9:30. 
Arco Birthday Party. NBC. Thur. 9. 
Arabesque, CBS, Sun. 10:30. 
Amos 'n' Andy, NBC, daily, 7 and 11. 
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, NBC, Mon. 

10 and 12. 
Anheuser-Busch. CBS, Mon. 7:45. 
Aunt Lulu's Adventures, NBC. Sat. 10:30. 
Ann Leaf. CBS, Mon. and Sat. 4; daily, 

12:30. 
Adventures in Words. CBS, Tues. 5:15. 
American Mutual Program, CBS, Tues. and 

Fri. 7:15. 
Art Gillham, CBS', Mon. 5. 

Back Home Hour. CBS, Sun. 11. 
Blackstone Plantation, NBC, Tues. 8, 

Thur. 9. 
Back of the News in Washington. NBC, 
Wed. 7:45. 

B. A. Rolfe and Lucky Strike Orchestra, 

NBC, Tues., Thur., Sat. 10. 
Black and Gold Room Orchestra. NBC, 

daily 6:05. 
Be Square Motor Club, CBS. Sun. 10:3 0. 
Billiken Pickards, NBC, Tues. and Sat. 

7:45. 
Bill Schudt's Going to Press. CBS, Wed. 6. 
Barbasol. CBS, Mon., Wed. and Fri. 8:15. 
Brazilian-American, NBC, Thur. 5. 
Blue Ribbon Malt Jester. CBS, Tues. 10. 
Book Reporter. NBC. Wed. 5. 
Boseul Moments, NBC, Wed. 7:3 and 

Fri. 7:15. 
Benjamin Moore Triangle, NBC, Fri. 

5:30. 
Ben Alley. CBS. S'at. 8:15. 

Catholic Hour. NBC. Sun. 6. 

Camel Pleasure Hour, NBC, Wed. 9:30 

and 11:15. 
Cities Service Orchestra. NBC. Fri. 8. 
Cliquot Club Eskimos, NBC, Fri. 9. 
Collier's Hour, NBC, Sun. 8:15. 
Chase and Sanborn Choral Orchestra, NBC, 

Sun. 8. 
Chesebrough Real Folks, NBC. Mon. 9:30. 
Coca Cola Top Notchers, NBC. Wed. 10:30. 
Canadian Pacific. NBC, Wed. 8:30. 
Cadman, Dr. S. Parkes. NBC, Sun. 4. 
Careless Love, NBC, Mon. 7:30. 
Current Events. CBS, Mon. 7. 
Cook's .Travel Series. NBC, Sun. 6:30. 
Campus, NBC, Sat. 9. 
Columbia Concerts Corp.. Wed. 10:30. 
Classic Gems. NBC, Sat. 4. 
Columbia Artist Recital. CBS. Tues. 4:30. 
Clara, Lu and Em. NBC, daily (except 

Mon), 10:30. 
Conti Program, NBC, Wed. 6:15. 
Chiclets Program. CBS. Tues. and Thur. 

7:30. 
Cuckoo. NBC, Sat. 10. 
Court Jesters, NBC. Sat. 4. 
Coty's Play Girl, CBS, Sun. 9. 
Chats with Peggy Winthrop. NBC. Mon. 

and Fri. 5. 
Cremo Program. CBS. daily. 8 and 11:15. 
Central Savings Screnaders, CBS, Wed. 

7:15. 
Cub and Scoop. NBC. Thur. and Fri. 

10:45. 

Dixies Circus, NBC, Sat. 8. 

Detective Story Magazine. CBS, Thur. 

9:30. 
Death Valley Days, NBC. Tues. 9:30. 
Davey Tree. NBC. Sun. 5. 
"Devils. Drugs and Doctors." CBS, Sim. 8. 
Daddy and Rollo. CBS, Wed. and Thur. 

7:45. 
Dutch Masters, CBS, Fri. 8:30. 

Empire Builders, NBC. Mon. 10:30. 
Evangeline Adams. CBS. Mon. and Wed. 

7 :S0. 
Early Bookworm, cits. Sat. 8:45 
Knna Jettlck, NBC. Sun. 8 and Fri. 9:30. 
Evensong. NBC. Sun. 11. 
Echoes of the Opera. NBC. Thur. 10. 
Eno Crime Club. CBS, dally, 8:45. 
Eastman symphony, nbc. wed. 4. 
Edward Rambler, NBC, Wed. 7:15. 
Eastman Kodak Hour, NBC, Fri. 10. 
Edgewater Tobacco Co.. NBC, Thur. S. 

Fox Fur Trappers. CBS. Sun. 6. 

Fro-Joy Plnvcrs. CHS. Thur. 7. 

Floyd Olbbons, NBC. Sun. 9:30. 

Florsheim Frolic. NBC. Tues. 8:30. 

Fuller Man. NBC. Sat. 8:30. 

Friendly Five Footnotes, NBC, Thur. 

7:45, 
Fifteen Minutes In Nation's Capital, NBC, 

Mon. 7:45, 
Kurd and Wallace. NBC. Mon. 8. 
Folgei Coffee Program. CHS. Thur. 12. 

General Klertrir Hour. NBC. S'at. 9. 
Golden Hour of the Little Flower. CBS. 
Sun. 7 



Gloria Gay's Affairs, NBC, Wed. 6:30. 
George Simons, NBC, Tues. 6. 
Gypsy Music Makers. CBS. Mon. 5:15. 
Guy Lombardo and Orchestra, CBS, Wed. 

11 and Sat. 11:30. 
Gauchos, CBS. Sun. 10:30. 
Graham-Paige Hour, CBS, Sun. 9:30. 
General Motors, NBC, Mon. 9:30. 
Graybar's, "Mr. and Mrs.." CBS, Tues. 

10. 
Gobel Mystery Girl, NBC, Mon. and Wed. 

5:30. 
Gold Medal Fast Freight, CBS. Wed. 9. 
General Mills Express, NBC. Mon. 8:30. 
Gruen Answer Man, NBC, Thur. and Sat. 

6:15. 
Golden Blossom Honey Orchestra, CBS, 

Sat. 7:15. 

Harbor Lights, NBC, Sun. 7:30. 
Henry-George, CBS, Tues. 9. 
Happy Wonder Bakers. NBC, Tues. 9:30. 
Halsey Stuart Program, NBC, Wed. 9. 
Hamilton Watch. CBS. Thur. 8:45. 
Hank Simmons' Showboat. CBS, Sat. 10. 
Howard Dandies. CBS, Sun. 6:30. 
How's Business. NBC, Mon. 8. 
Household Finance, NBC, Tues. 9. 
Home Decoration, NBC, Thur. 4. 
Heel Hugger Harmonies, NBC, Sun. 11. 

Interwoven Pair, NBC. Fri. 9. 
Iodent Big Brother Club, NBC, Sun. 7. 
International Broadcast. CBS. Sun. 12:30. 
Italian Idyll, CBS, Tues. 4. 
International Shoe Co.. CBS, W 7 ed. 10. 
Iny Scott, NBC, Wed. 5. 

Jack Frosfs Melody Moments, NBC, Thur. 

9:30. 
lolly Junketeer. NBC. Wed. and Sat. 5:15. 
Junior Detectives. NBC, Sat. 5:30. 
Johnny Marvin, NBC, Tues. 10:45 and 

Fri. 8:30. 

KafTee Hag Program, NBC, Sun. 10:30. 
Kaltenborn News. CBS, Sun., Tues. and 
Thur. 8:30. 

Literary Digest. NBC. daily, 6:45, and 

CBS, daily, 8. 
Le Trio Morgan, NBC. Wed. 4. 
Lutheran Layman's Program, CBS, Thur. 

10. 
Laws that Safeguard Society. NBC, Sat. 

7:15. 
Listerine — Bobby Jones, NBC. Wed. 8. 
Little Jack Little. NBC, Sat. 11:45 and 

Wed. 7. 
Lady Next Door. NBC. Mon. and Tues. 

5:30 (daily. 5). 
Landt Trio and White. NBC, Tues. and 

Fri. 8:30. 
Light Opera Gems. CBS, Fri. 5. 
La Gerardine. CBS. Mon. and Thur. 5:45. 
La Palina, CBS, Tues. 7:45. 

Major Bowe's Family. NBC. Fri. 7. 
Mormon Tabernacle, NBC, Mon. 6:15. 
Maytag Orchestra, NBC, Mon. 9. 
Mnhiloil Concert, NBC. Wed. 8:30. 
Mid-week Hymn Sing. NBC, Thur. 7. 
Maxwell House Melodies. NBC, Thur. 

9:30. 
Margaret Olsen, NBC, Sun. 6. 
Muriel and Vee, NBC. Sun. 11: 15. 
Music Appreciation Hour, NBC. Fri. 11 

A. M. 
Musical Moment. NBC. Sun. 6:15. 
Musical Demi-tasse. NBC. Mon. 7. 
McKesson Musical Magazine, NBC, Tues. 9. 
Morton Downey. CBS, Mon. 11. Wed.. 

Thur.. Fri.. Sat. 7 and Thur. 12. 
Melodv Muslseteers. CBS. Mon. 6:30. 
Magic of Speech. NBC, Thur. 4. 
Mary Charles. CBS. Thur. 8:15. 
Market Reports. NBC (daily), 5:45. 
Mabel Wayne, NBC. Wed. 4:30. 
Mellow Tones. NBC. Wed. 8. 
Melody Magic, CBS. Thur. 5. 
March of Time. CBS. Fri. 10:30. 
Musical Album. CBS. Wed. 4. 



Pennzoil Pete. NBC. Sun. 8:15. 
Paul Whiteman. NBC, Tues. 8. 
Pacific Feature Program. NBC. Sat. 4. 
Phil. Spitalny Orchestra. NBC. Tues. and 

Sat. 12. 
Pacific Vagabonds, NBC, Tues. 4. 
Pond's, NBC, Tues. 5. 
Piano Pals, CBS, Sun. 8:45. 
President's Emergency Committee, CBS, 

Wed. 6:15. 

Quaker Oats, NBC. daily. 7:30, except 
Sat. 

Roxy Symphony Orchestra, NBC, Sun. 

11:30 A. M. 
Russian Cathedral Choir, NBC, Sun. 

11:30. 
Reminiscences. NBC. Sun. 9:45. 
Roxy and His Gang, NBC. Mon. 7:45. 
Robert Burns Panatela. CBS. Mon. 10. 
Rudy Vallee. NBC. Thur. 8. 
R-K-0 Hour. NBC, Fri. 10:30. 
Rise of the Goldbergs, NBC, Sat. 7:30. 
Raising Junior, NBC. daily (except Mon.), 

6. 
Radio Luminaries. NBC, Sun. 9:15. 
Royal Hours. CBS. Sun. 10. 
Radiotron Varieties, NBC, Wed. and Sat. 

8:15. 
Radio Guild. NBC. Fri. 4. 
RCA Victor. NBC, Sun. 7:30. 
Romanelli and Orchestra. CBS. Fri. 11:30. 
Radio Listening Test, CBS. Mon. 4. 
Rinso Talkie. NBC, Tues. and Thur. 5:30. 
Radio Roundup. CBS, Thur. 11:30. 
Rhythm Choristers, CBS. Sun. 8:15. 
Rex Cole Mountaineers. NBC. daily. 5:45. 
Rapid Transit. Tues. and Thur. 11. 
Round Towners, CBS, Wed. 5:30. 

Sunday at Seth Parker's. NBC. Sun. 10:45. 

Stromberg-Carlson, NBC, Mon. 10. 

Soconyland Sketches. NBC. Tues. 7:30. 

Slumber Music. NBC. daily 11. 

South Sea Islanders. NBC, Sun. 11:30. 

Science. NBC. Wed. 7:15. 

Savino Tone Pictures, CBS. Wed. 9:30. 

Susan Steell. NBC. Thur. 6. 

School of the Air. CBS. 2:30 School Days. 

Silver Mask Tenor. NBC. Wed. 7:15. 

Smith Bros.. NBC, Wed. 7:45. 

Salada Tea Co.. NBC. Thur. 8:30. 

Song Shoppe. NBC. Sat. 4:30. 

Sun Kist Musical Cocktail. CBS. Wed. 

8:30. 
Sky Sketches. NBC. Wed. 4:30. 
Sweethearts of the Air. CBS. Sun. 5:30. 
Savannah Liners Orchestra. NBC. Tues. 

6:30. 
Sundial Bonnie Laddies. NBC. Fri. 6:30. 
Spanish Serenade. CBS. Sat. 4:30. 
Simmons Hour. CBS. Mon. 8:30. 
Scholl Program. NBC. Tues. 7:45. 
Salon Singers. NBC. Sat. 7. 
Silver Flute. NBC. Sat. S:30. 
Sermon by Dr. Barnhouse. CBS. Sun. 5. 

Tastyeast Jesters, NBC. Mon.. Thur. and 
Sat. 7:15. 

True Story Hour.CBS. Fri. 9. 

Troubadour of the Moon, NBC. Sat. 11. 

Three Bakers. CBS. Mon. 9. 

Toscha Seldel, CBS. Thur. 10:30. 

Two Troupers. NBC. Fri. 9:45. 

Tony's Scrapbook. CBS. daily. 5:30 (ex- 
cept Mon. ) . 

Tea Timers. NBC, Mon. 5, Wed.. Fri. and 
Sat. 5:30. 

Three Doctors. CBS. Thur. 4. 

Ted Husing's Sport Slants. CBS. Sat. 6. 

Twilight Hour. NBC. Tues. 4:30. 

Ted Lewis and Musical Clowns. NBC. Sat. 
7:30. 

Uncle Abe and David. NBC. Wed.. Thur. 

Fri. and Sat. 6:45. 
U. S. Service Band. CBS. Wed. 4. Mon. 

4. NBC. Mon. 4. Thur. 4:30. 
V. S. Rubber Co. Program, NBC. Tues. 

7:15. 



Niagara Hudson. NBC. Thur. 7:30. 
Natural Bridge Program. NBC. Fri. 8:45. 
New York Philharmonic Orchestra, CBS, 

Sun. 3. 
Nestle Chocolateers. NBC, Fri. 8. 
National Y'outh Conference. NBC. Sun. 3. 
National Radio Forum. CBS. Sat. 9:30. 
Northern Lights, NBC. Sun. 6:30. 
National Vespers. NBC, Sun. 5. 
National Dairy Program. NBC. Sun. 10. 

Out Government, NBC. Sun. 9. 
Old Gold Character Readings. CBS, Tues. 
8:15 and Thur. 9. 

Paul Trcmalne and Orchestra. CBS, Tues. 

11. Thur. 6. Sat. 6:30. 
Palmollrc Hour. NBC. Wed. 9:30. 
Philco Symphony. CBS. Tues. 9:30. 
Paramount Publix Hour. CBS, Tues. 

10:30. 
Premier Salad Dressers. CBS. Thur. 9. 
Political Situation In Washington, CBS. 

Tues. 7. 



Vincent Lopez. NBC. Tues.. Wed. and 

Fri. 11. 
Voters' Sen-ice Program. NBC. Tues. 7. 
Vapex Musical Doctors. NBC. Sat. 9:30. 
Van Hcusen. CBS. Fri. 10. 

Williams Oilomatics, NBC. Sim. 4. 
Wonder Dog. NBC. Thur. 8:15. 
World To-day. NBC. Mon. 7:15. 
Who's Behind the Name. NBC. Mon. and 

Tues. fi:3 0. 
Weber and Fields. NBC. Sat. 8. 
Wayside Inn. NBC. Wed. 9. 
Westinghnuse Salute. NBC. Sun. 7. 
Walter Mills. NBC. Tues. 6:15. 
Works of Composers. NBC. Tues. S:30. 
Wavne King. NBC. Wed. 12:30. 
Women in Government Service. NBC, Wed. 

6. 
Wheeler Sea Song. NBC. Thur. 0:30. 
Wallace Silversmiths. CBS. Sat. 8:30. 
World in Music. NBC. Fri. 6. 

"Your Eyes." NBC. Sun. 4:30. 







ON THE AIR." In response to requests for a picture of a studio broadcasting scene, we present this glimpse of the "Empire Builders" in action in the new Chicago studios of NIK I In 

he rostrum in the center of the picture is Don Bernard, director, while on the right of the mike arc Don Amcchc; Harvey Hays, the Old-timer; Lucille Husting and Bcrnadine Flynn. Ted 

'earson, the announcer, is seated directly below Mr. Bernard, while behind him is Josef Kocstncr, director of the orchestra. Orchestra and singers arc in the background. The men at the left 
re operating the sound-effects equipment. 

MAX BIGMAN, Crow Indian chief, with his love lute, has proven an attraction at WGY. ABIGAIL PARECIS, full-blooded South American Indian girl and native of Brazil, sang on 

7GY's Brazilian program. "Onward, Christian Soldiers!" So sings SETH PARKER, while MA PARKER plays the organ. Scth is the beloved "down East" character of NBC's "Sunday Night 
t Scth Parker's," and is played by Phillips Lord. Ma Parker is played by Effie Palmer. 



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VOL.2 NO. 7 





T^TAY 
1931 



Irene 

JDordoru 

CBS 








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frklc 



Listeners to Collier's Hour during March and April received a chill from the dramatic presentation each Sunday evening of an episode 
from Sax Rohmer's latest thriller, "You 'An Hee See Laughs." PARKER WILSON, as "Yu 'An Hee See," "laughed" most villain- 
ously, while ADELE RONSON won the hearers' sympathy in the difficult role of "Orange Blossom." 



Before the central edifice of "Radio City," and wider than Fifth Avenue, will stretch a shrubbery-planted plaza, with fountains 
and flower-beds. The plaza will continue as a private street through archways to Forty-eighth and Fifty-first Streets. Thus within 
the walls of Radio City will be a beautiful parkway of its own as indicated in the artist's drawing below. Beneath the plaza will 
be the subway station and underground lobby. There will be underground parking area for thousands of machines, and all shipping 
for occupants of the six-block "Radio City" will be handled in the underground levels. 




©C1B 112430 

*«**' WHAT'S ON THE AlR 



VOLUME II. 



THE MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 



MAY, 1931 



No. 7 



jeleofslon (eeps (Wind fibe vomer 

Stj Don Dagfe 



TELEVISION has lurked "just around the cor- 
ner" for many years, but in spite of the pessi- 
mistic reports early in the year, this spring has 
seen television peeping around that corner. 

Television has made a good start, and, if this 
writer is not very much off his reportorial course, 
you, the radio listener, will become a "looker-in" 
before next Christmas. 

Sight and sound transmissions have been on the 
air nearly a year. Chicago has contributed tre- 
mendously in this phase, while New York has just 
recently begun such broadcasting with the inaugu- 
ration of the WGBS-Jenkins station at Fifth Ave- 
nue and Fifty-second Street. 

The Columbia Broadcasting System should be 
on the air with an experimental television trans- 
mitter by the time this story has been printed. 

The National Broadcasting Company has been 
operating experimental television station W3XBS 
atop the New Amsterdam Theater building for sev- 
eral months. Their sole transmissions, however, 
have been views of cards and of Felix, a wooden cat. 

Boston experimental stations created a stir in 
that city some time ago when television images 
were picked up in a local store and shown to the 
general public. Hundreds of interested visitors 
lined up for hours to glimpse the one-inch square 
images which were reflected from a television re- 
ceiver. 

A news story widely published by newspapers 
throughout the country recently told of television 
images being reproduced by M. A. Sanabria, a Chi- 
cago engineer, on a ten-foot screen. Investigation 
proved that this was actually being accomplished, 
although the equipment utilized was in an experi- 
mental stage and highly expensive. It was de- 
signed, the inventor hastened to explain, for use in 
theaters and large auditoriums. Triple scanning, 
neon arc lamps and electrical retouching have also 
been introduced by Sanabria. 

Another company, known as Radio Pictures, has 
been transmitting images for many months in the 



A television receiver which presents pictures 
tight inches tquare (R. /.. Rcplogle, assistant to 
president nj Jenkin Deforest Co.). 



New York area. In Washington, D. C, Jenkins 
has long been transmitting half-tones, motion pic- 
tures and silhouettes from W3XK. Images from 
this station have been on the air since 1925. 

The Baird Television Corporation of Great Brit- 
ain has established offices in New York. Although 
the Baird interests have no transmitter in operation 
here, they are London's leading television experi- 
menters and broadcasters, where they have contrib- 
uted nobly to the science with many developments. 

Baird and Jenkins claim to be the pioneers of 
the industry, although the General Electric Com- 
pany and the American Telephone and Telegraph 
Company have both been engaged in laboratory ex- 
perimentation for years — perhaps before either of 
the two inventors who brought their researches be- 
fore the public at earlier dates. 

General Electric, it is said, was the first to 
broadcast an actual play by television. Three tele- 
vision cameras, or projectors, were utilized for this 
unusual transmission which took place between 
1925 and 1927. 

Line-wire television demonstrations are being 
shown regularly by the A. T. & T. in their New 
York laboratories. Their results are striking, to 
say the least. Clear and sharp are the pictures as 
one sees them in the strange little telephone-tele- 
vision booths especially constructed for the demon- 
stration. 

Parts for construction of television receivers arc 
readily obtainable in most of the large cities. Com- 
pleted receivers are making their appearance on the 
markets, although they are rather expensive for the 
average radio listener. 

Small television units may be purchased for 
$100, which, when operated in conjunction with 
proper semi-short-wave receiving equipment, will 
give clear pictures about one inch square. It might 
be said here that the televisor unit is attached to 

Television Eyes in the NBC Experimental Studios 



the receiver in the same manner as the conventional 
loud speaker. 

Television receivers must utilize resistance 
coupled amplifiers, with power tubes. They must 
tune broadly and have a range of between 100 
and 200 meters. 

The one main requisite of television reception 
is to obtain loud signals. The louder you hear 
television signals, the clearer and brighter will be 
your images, since the neon tube in the televisor 
depends on this superimposed current from the 
amplifiers of your receiver for its brilliance and 
resultant pictures. The receiver must, in the case 
of television reception, tune broadly. If it tunes 
sharply, you will obtain distorted images. 

A televisor consists of a synchronous motor, 
which must run at the same speed and phase as 
the transmitting motor. This motor turns over a 
scanning disk, which contains forty-five or forty- 
eight or sixty holes carefully spaced. These holes 
must correspond with the holes in the transmitting 
scanning-disk. They form the lines of your pic- 
ture. Thus it is said that you receive forty-eight- 
line pictures or sixty-line pictures. 

Television has been somewhat simplified in this 
respect in the East, since an agreement reached last 
month will make it necessary for all television trans- 
mitters to utilize the sixty-line transmitting disks. 

Behind your disk there is the neon tube, on 
whose plate the images appear to form while they 
are being scanned. Then through a magnifying- 
glass you peer through the disk at the plate and 
the images become visible. 

The commonly used scanning-disk is gradually 
being replaced in laboratories by the drum scan- 
ner-disc, which, through the added use of power- 
ful magnifying-glasscs, will give sharp and clear 
images eight inches square. This equipment is in- 
tended for home use. Of course, much larger im- 
ages can be obtained where money is not an im- 
portant factor in purchasing equipment. 
(To be con tin lied next issue.) 



\ situ I*!,, home television set over which Doi 
othy SchuJt, wife oj CBS "Going to Press" 
man, is viewing motion pictures from Boston 
in her New York home. 




Page 4 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



A' 



(W 



GAIN we experiment 
with our program sched- 
ule. This time we present on 
pages 18 to 31 a bird's-eye 
view of American chain pro- 
grams hour by hour during the 
evening period, listing every 

station scheduled at NBC and CBS to receive each 
chain program. With each map is a list of all 
chain programs under way, indexed for each fifteen 
minutes of the hour. 

Turn to any date and hour in May, choose 
from the programs available the one you want and 
locate the nearest available station bearing it. 
Glance at page 33 for its location on your dial if 
you don't remember it, tune in and enjoy the feat- 
ure you want at any given minute between five and 
midnight, Eastern Daylight time. 

Once again we ask our friends to write us. Do 
you prefer us to perfect this issue's system or shall 
we return to the system used in March and April? 



As we write we have before us letters from more 
than a score of broadcasting stations stating their 
utter inability to forecast their May programs be- 
cause of the change to Daylight Saving Time, 
which will govern all programs supplied by the 
chains after April 26. On the 10th of April, pro- 
gram directors of stations in areas where the time 
does not change can make no definite plans for 
chain programs for May until they can readjust 
all their local programs, many of which were con- 
tracted for a definite time now to be pre-empted 
by a chain favorite. That situation makes May an 
ideal month for us to try a schedule experiment, for 
it will be well into May before local programs can 
be scheduled again with any exactitude, and to pub- 
lish this magazine and get it to you from coast to 
coast by May 1, we must go to press by April 15. 

Even in the case of chain programs, there will 
be many cancellations and shiftings about early in 
May, as sponsors living in Standard Time areas come 
to realize that their programs go on the air before 
the average listener becomes conscious that the eve- 
ning has begun. The ten o'clock Eastern Daylight 
programs will be nearing completion before many of 
us middle Westerners will be coming into the house 
from our after-dinner tinkering about the garden. 
We'll just have our radios under way in time for the 
second Amos 'n' Andy show, but such is the result 
of being a citizen of a country which in the summer 
reaches across five time belts. Of course, what we 
are getting at in all this rambling is to warn you 
that no program service except a local daily, edited 
from a telegraphic service, could offer you real ac- 
curacy in either May or November. They are the 
great "moving" months of radio, when even old 
stand-bys are apt to be canceled or shifted. 



Ml^ammfamvuncemenls 



6 r J 



AMOS WAS MADAME QUEEN, 
ANDY HIS OWN LAWYER 

AMOS and Andy adhered to their policy 
of refusing assistance even during the 
crowded days of the late breach of promise 
suit. The boys carried on as usual by them- 
selves. Amos took the parts of the Kingfish, 
Brother Crawford, Lightnin', the Judge, Law- 
yer Smith and Madame Queen. Andy was 
Lawyer Collins and the bailiff, as well as de- 
fendant during the trial. As usual, no one 
was permitted in the studio while they were 
broadcasting. Even Bill Hay is stationed in 
another room along with the musicians. 

We give this information direct from 
WMAQ in answer to dozens of letters from 
our readers. 

And here's another rumor squelched. The 
boys write their own script. Every week-day 
at noon Andy sits down at the typewriter in 
the boys' office, and for three or four hours 
the two concentrate on the script for the day. 
There is no rehearsal. Once written, the boys 
seldom look at the script again until a few 
minutes before they are due on the air. 



NEW PROGRAMS 

It is rumored that Flit will return to the air this 
summer, featuring "Believe It or Not" Ripley. 

Every station which affiliates with WEAF, ex- 
cept WWJ, Detroit (a total of nearly sixty), has 
arranged to carry the Firestone Hour from 4:15 to 
5:15 Sunday afternoons, beginning May 31. 

Helen Oelheim, young American contralto, has 
succeeded Miss Taiz in the role of "Freda," daugh- 
ter of "Peter Zorn," in whose shop the Dutch Mas- 
ters congregate each Friday evening at 8:30 p. m. 

Peter Pan Fashion Broadcasts, formerly a morn- 
ing period, has moved up to the 10:15 spot on Wed- 
nesday nights over CBS. Teddy Black's orchestra 
provides a musical background for the noted style 
specialists who are featured. 

V£ 
If, after the time change, some favorite program 
disappears from its accustomed place on the air, 
send us a self-addressed, stamped envelope, and we 
shall be glad to tell you whether it has gone on va- 
cation or has found new associations. 



The McAleer Polishers are 
a new CBS presentation each 
Wednesday at 10:3 p. m. on 
a nation-wide hook-up. The 
principals are Scrappy Lambert 
and Dick Robertson, vocalists; 
Dave Elman, humorist, and 

Sam Lanin and his dance orchestra. Harry von Zell 

is master of ceremonies. 

m 

Five young men from Rockcastle County, Ky. 
— "the Cumberland Ridge Runners"- — are scheduled 
to inaugurate a new weekly series of programs over 
CBS to be known as the "Olson Rug Folk Songs." 
Station list and time have not yet reached us. 

With the beautiful Countess Olga Albani and a 
male quartet of four solo specialists as leading at- 
tractions, aided by a concert orchestra, the Kodak 
Week-end program has returned to the air for the 
summer season. The outlet is WEAF, and the time 
10 p. m„ E. D. T. 

JS 

Three addresses by President Hoover will be 
broadcast by the chains during May. On May 4 
he speaks to the International Chamber of Com- 
merce; on May 21 his speech will commemorate 
the fiftieth anniversary of the American Red Cross, 
and on May 3 1 he will make the Memorial Day ad- 
dress at historic Valley Forge. 

Don't forget that Empire Builders will offer 
something special Monday, May 4, at 10:30 p. M., 
when the drama for the evening will be "The Le- 
gend of the Wild Rose." The cast includes Harvey 
Hays, Lucille Husting, Don Ameche, John Daly, 
William Roth and Theodore Daucet. Unusual 
sound effects are promised. That means something, 
for the listeners are generally agreed that Empire 
Builders is far in the lead in presenting sound effects. 

SSI 

Among the men of affairs who are soon to give 
brief talks on business during the Halsey, Stuart 
broadcasts, Wednesday evenings over NBC, are 
Rome C. Stephenson, president of the American 
Bankers' Association; D. F. Kelley, president of 
the National Retail Dry Goods Association; T. 
George Lee, president of Armour & Co., and T. S. 
Morgan, president F. W. Dodge Corporation. Seven 
Pacific Coast stations have joined the already large 
network for this series. 

Si 

Last issue we ran a picture and brief story about 
"The Dixie Spiritual Singers," a group of twenty- 
five Southern negroes, recruited from the tobacco 
work-rooms of Larus Brothers at Richmond, Va., 
who were putting on an unusually attractive pro- 



Vol. II. 



WHAT'S ON THE AlR 

(Registered in U. S. Patent Office) 

MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 



No. 7 



Published monthly at Ninth and Cutter Sts., Cincinnati, O., by WHAT'S ON 
THE AIR 00. Printed in U. S. A. 

Editorial and Circulation Offices: Hox (i, Station N, Cincinnati, O. 

Advertising Offices: 11 W. Forty-second St., New York City. 

Price, !f>c. i»er copy; $1.50 per year. 

(Copyright, 19:11, by What's on the Air Co.) 

Patents applied for coyer basic features of program-finding: service offered 
in this magazine. 

"Entered as second-class matter Apr. 19, 19.30, at the post-office at Cincin- 
nati, O., under tub Act of March .">, 1879." 



AGENTS WANTED. — Take orders for What's on the Air subscriptions in your commu- 
nity: Every radio home a good prospect. Your friends and neighbors will enjoy this new radio 
program directory and magazine. Full or part time work. Liberal offer to both men ind. women. 

Write for our proposition to agents.— Circulation Manager, What's on the Air, Ninth 
and Cutter Sts., Cincinnati, O. 



statement op ownership, management, circulation, etc., requred by the act of 
congress op august 24, 1912. 

Of "What's on the Air," published monthly at Cincinnati, O.. for April 1, 1931. Slate of Ohio. County of 
Hamilton. 

Before me. a Notary Public in and for the st.ue and county aferosaid. personally appeared Willard Mohorter, 
who, having been duly sworn according to law. deposes and says that he is the editor of the "What's on the Air." 
and that the following is. to the best of his knowledge and belief, a true statement of the ownership, manage- 
ment, etc.. of the aforesaid publication for the date shown in the above caption, required by the Act of August 24, 
1912, embodied in Section 4 11. Postal Laws and Regulations, printed on the reverse of this form, to wit: 

1. That the names and addresses of the publisher, editor, managing editor and business managers arc: Pub- 
lisher. The Standard Publishing Company, Box .">. Sta. N. Cincinnati. O ; editor. Willard Mohorter, Box (i. Sta. N, 
Cincinnati. O. : managing editor. Willard Mohorter: business managers. Russell Errett, John P. Etrett. 

2. That the owner is: The Standard Publishing Company. Boy 5, Sta. N. Cincinnati. O. : Russell Errett. Hotel 
Alms: Willard Mohorter. Box 4. Mt. Healthy: John P. Errett. 2GS;"> Montana; W. R. Walker. 2aa2 Glen Echo 
Drive, Columbus, O. : W. R. Errett. I!20r> Ridge Avenue. 

3. That the known bondholders, mortgagees and other securily holders owning or holding one per cent, or 
more of total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities, are: None. 

4. That the two paragraphs next above, giving the names of the owners, stockholders, and security holders, 
if anv. contain not only the list of stockholders and security holders as they appear upon the hooks of the com- 
pany, but also, in eases where the stockholder or security holder appears upon the books of the company as trus- 
tee or in any oilier fiduciary relation, the name of the person or corporation for whom such trustee is acting, is given; 
also that the said two paragraphs contain statements embracing affiant's full knowledge and belief as to the 
Circumstances and conditions under which stockholders and security holders who do not api>ear upon the books of 
the company as trustees, hold stock and securities in a capacity other than that of a bona-fide owner: and tins 
affiant has no reason to believe that any other person, association, or corporation has any interest direct or indirect 
in Ihe said stock, bonds, or oilier securities than as so stated by him. 

5. That the average number of copies of each issue of this publication sold or distributed, through the mails 

or otherwise, to paid subscribers during the six months preceding the date shown above is 

(This information is required for daily publications only.) WILLARD Mohorter. 

s«orn lo and subscribed before me this 26U) day of March. 1031 

[SEAL] John S'. Moeller. 

(My commission expires FebruaD' 11. 1933.) 
I'orm 3520. — Ed. 1924. 






May, iq^t 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 



PRINCIPALS IN "LITTLE ORPHAN ANNIE, 



NBC'S NEW DAILY SERIAL GUS VAN, THE KEDS MAN 



NBC, TUESDAY NIGHTS 




Skirled 
£ell 



And now Little Orphan Annie has joined the networks. Since Monday, April 6, the character made 
famous by Harold Gray on the Chicago Tribune, has been a six-nights-a-wcek feature through a group 
of NBC stations. 

Annie brought her entire gang with her from the funny paper to radio, including Mr. and Mrs. Silo 
and Joe Corntassel, to say nothing of her inseparable companion, "Sandy," the dog. Ten-year-old 
SHIRLEY BELL plays the role of Annie, while the role of Joe is enacted by ALLAN BARUCK, 
twelve years old, both Chicago stage and microphone veterans, in spite of their extreme youth. The Silo 
roles are played by Henrietta Tedro and Jerry O'Meara. 




gram from Station WRVA. Now, thanks to NBC, 
these untrained singers of original negro melodies 
may be heard by our readers generally. "The Dixie 
Singers" are presented over WJZ and associates 
every Thursday evening at 8 o'clock. 

While the Gold Medal Fast Freight continues its 
CBS run each Wednesday at 9 p. m., a new aerial 
train — the Gold Medal Express, now roars through 
a network of NBC stations every Monday at 8:30 
P. m., E. D. T. It bears an unusually varied ar- 
ray of talent, including Victor Arden and Phil Oh- 
man, famed piano team (see p. 15); a novelty or- 
chestra, the Wheaties trio, an impersonator and 
a guest artist. The trio consists of Joe Shuster and 
Johnny Tucker, both well known as song writers, 
and Monroe Silver, an RCA-Victor recording artist. 
Ford Bond is the 'announcer on the express. 

% 

CBS has organized its Southern stations into a 
unit to be known as "The Dixie Network." The 
key station is WBT at Charlotte, N. C, and while 
the dozen or more affiliated stations will still be a 
part of the regular chain, carrying many of the 
New York programs, they will also have a series of 
programs of their own whenever the regular CBS 
facilities arc occupied with commercial programs 
calling for only the basic chain. This means that 
by our next issue we shall be called on to list in our 
schedules some special programs reaching exclusively 
the CBS stations in the South. 
/-■ 

The latter half of the Deems Taylor Musical 
Series, an educational course in Grand Opera, with 
brief explanations by Deems Taylor himself, and 
the illustrations from operas sung in English, will 
be presented in May. Both NBC systems are car- 
rying this series in order to bring this opportunity 
to understand and appreciate opera to the largest 
possible audience. The subjects for May are as 
follow: May 3, "The Second Reformation;" May 
10, "The Revolution;" May 17, "Verdi;" May 24, 
"Opera after Wagner;" May 31, "American Com- 
posers and American Opera." The May 31st pro- 
gram will begin 1:45 (E. D. T.) and last forty-five 
minutes. The others open at 2 p. M. and last one- 
half hour. 



Among the chain programs which have left 
the air for the summer are Davey Hour, Luden's, 
Floyd Gibbons, Enna Jettick, Billikin Pickards, 
Uncle Abe and David, Smith Brothers, Edward 
Rambler, Two Troupers, Dixie Circus, Vapex Doc- 
tors, The Campus, Golden Hour, Be-Square Club, 
Sam Lloyd and Fro-Joy. Other withdrawals are 
imminent. However, a goodly number of new fea- 
tures are promised for the summer months. Fire- 
stone, Domino Sugar, Compana, Bayuk Cigars, Lit- 
tle Orphan Annie, Tidewater Inn, Fortune Builders, 
McAleer Polishers and Postal Telegraph are but 
some of those which have already been definitely 
contracted. 

Air Channels. 

On April 14 the Federal Commission gets down 
to brass tacks again on the question of deciding 
which stations shall be permitted to increase their 
power to 50,000 
watts. 



"FORTUNE BUILDERS' 



The new station list issued by the Federal Ra- 
dio Commission is now ready for the public. It 
may be obtained from the Government Printing 
Office at Washington on receipt of fifteen cents in 
coin, not stamps. 

The hard-worked Federal Commission received in 
one application recently request for authority to 
add 267 new broadcasting stations to the already 
overloaded air. The complete plan of the sponsors 
calls for exclusive use of twenty-five channels, 
which it would use through some eight hundred 
small stations to be built in cities of from 10,000 
to 100,000 population to provide purely local ser- 
vice. 

With television bobbing out from around the 
corner, and but four channels available for the 
entire United States, public necessity bids fair to 
bring a drastic shake-up of broadcasting by another 

CBS, SUNDAY AND THURSDAY AT 10:30 p. m. 



It is quite prob- 
able that before these 
lines are read WTMJ 
at Milwaukee will be 
granted relief from 
interference which 
now limits its recep- 
tion. Just what sta- 
tions will be shifted 
is still a mystery. 

>' 

Early in May, 
WHP at Harrisburg, 
WHEC at Roches- 
ter, WCAH at Co- 
lumbus, and WOKO 
at Albany, all four 
aligned with CBS, 
are scheduled to be- 
g i n synchronized 
broadcasting simul- 
taneously o n the 
1430 kilocycle chan- 
nel. 



This new program offers to Eastern and 
middle Western listeners one of the foremost 
newspaper interviewers of our time. Not only 
is DOUGLAS GILBERT distinguished by his 
remarkable word-pictures of practically every 
person of prominence in this country, but he 
possesses those rare qualities of voice and mind 
that arc counted rich attributes of the radio 
spokesman. In "Fortune Builders" Douglas 
Gilbert sketches microphone word-pictures of 
America's great business leaders. 




Page 6 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



year. One ray of hope is seen in the application 
of Radio Pictures, Inc., now before the Commis- 
sion for permission to experiment in television in 
the upper radio spectrum above the present recog- 
nized limit of 23,000 kilocycles. 



By the way, we find the hours of 4 to 6 A. M. 
surprisingly interesting for DX work. We tune in 
some convenient testing program and wait until 
the set is warmed up thoroughly. Then if static 
seems heavy we turn the set off and go back to 
bed; but if atmospheric conditions are at all favor- 
able, we find that patient work up and down the 
dials will often bring in a surprising number of sta- 
tions. Early morning listening-in almost always 
adds to your list of stations heard on such crowded 
channels as 1200, 1210, 1310, 1970, 1420 and 
1500. 

ft 

A piece of copper tubing three feet ten inches 
long and one inch in diameter, wrapped from one 
end to the other with No. 20 copper aerial wire, 
and then buried in a deep hole is a most perfect 
ground for DX reception. At least, this is the 
scheme adopted by Ollie Ross, of Vallejo, Calif. 
With an eighty-foot aerial and lead-in from this 
ground to his radio set he tells of bringing them 
in far and near. In three years' time his record 
shows that he has logged over 1,308 stations from 
every State in the Union as well as from Can- 
ada, Mexico, Europe, Asia, the Philippines and Af- 
rica. 

Si 

An amazing number of DXers not only on the 
Pacific Coast, but in decreasing numbers as far 
east as Indianapolis, have been made happy the past 
three months by listening in on Japan. On the west 
coast even five-tube battery sets well located have 
proved sufficient to pick up all eight of Japan's 
10,000 watters. While it is almost too much to 
hope that such favorable reception conditions will 
continue through April and into May, a tip from 
the successful DXers will undoubtedly be welcome. 
The best time to fish for the JO stations is between 
3:3 and 6:30 A. m., C. S. T. The Jap stations 
are JOFK at Hiroshima (849 Kc.) ; JOGK at Ku- 
mamoto (789 Kc); JOCK at Najoya (810 Kc.) ; 
JOBK at Osaka (75 Kc); JOIK at Sapporo (831 
Kc.) ; JOHK at Sendai (769 Kc.) ; JOAK at Tokyo 
(869 Kc), and JOKK at Yokohama (590 Kc). 



Sport Broadcasts in May. 

The Intercollegiate track championship to be 
held at Franklin Field, Philadelphia, early in May 
will be another offering of the chains to sport lovers. 

m 

If you can get WLW and are a sports fan, don't 
overlook Col. Bob. Newhall's week-day night sports 
reviews over the Cincinnati 50,000 watter. 

'/' 

CBS announces that it will carry over its chain 
an average of four sports events of general inter- 
est per week throughout the summer months. 



Golfers will have an extra inning on the air 
in May when the chains cover the Ryder Club 
Matches (U. S. vs. Great Britain) to be held this 
year at the Scioto Club, Columbus, O. 

in 

As usual, the automobile race at the Speedway, 
Indianapolis, will be broadcast by both chains on 
Memorial Day. However, only the closing hour of 
the race will be covered. 



Both NBC and CBS have arranged to cover 
the two outstanding races in May: The Preakness 
at Pimlico track, Baltimore, on May 9, and the 
Derby at Churchill Downs, Louisville, on May 16. 
Clem McCarthy will be at the microphone for 
NBC. The CBS announcer has not yet been an- 
nounced. 

1^ 

Major League baseball is to be on the air regu- 
larly this season from Chicago, St. Louis, Cleve- 
land, Detroit and Boston. In Chicago, WGN, 
WMAQ and WCFL cover the home games of both 
the Cubs and the White Sox, while WBBM follows 
the Cubs daily. In St. Louis KMOX and KWK 
broadcast the Cardinal's home games. WTAM is 
scheduled to describe the Cleveland team's home 
games; WJR, the games at Detroit, while WNAC 
will follow the local fortunes of both Boston teams. 



Irene Bordoni as "The Coty Playgirl." 
(See Cover Page.) 

Irene Bordoni, who hitherto has confined her ra- 
dio activities to guest appearances, has signed a long- 
term contract to portray the title role of "The 
Coty Playgirl" in a series of broadcasts over the 
Columbia network every Sunday at 9 p. M., E. D. T. 

A star of the first magnitude on stage and screen, 
Mme. Bordoni had often expressed a desire to affiliate 
herself with radio entertainment, and, though many 
highly remunerative offers were submitted to her, 
she was unable to select a suitable vehicle. 

However, as "The Coty Playgirl," the chanteuse 
is given a sophisticated setting that affords her am- 
ple opportunity to display her charms as a singing 
and dramatic actress. Each broadcast presents her 
in a different locale — one of international reputation 
as a rendezvous for the socially prominent. On one 
broadcast she is heard entertaining aboard a ship 
bound for Havana, and later at a popular Havana 
supper club, singing such typical Bordoni numbers 
as "So This Is Love" and "Let's Do It." 

Appearing with Mme. Bordoni in her first dra- 
matic and singing role on the radio is a specially 
selected cast of players recruited from the Broad- 
way stage. An orchestra of eighteen pieces, di- 
rected by Eugene Ormandy, accompanies Mme. Bor- 
doni's songs and provides the musical interludes. 

Irene Bordoni was born in Corsica. She made 
her first stage appearances in the music-halls and 
opera-houses of the Continent, where her name soon 
shone brightly in large electric lights. Her Ameri- 
can debut occurred in "Miss Information," with El- 
sie Janis, and later she was seen with Raymond 
Hitchcock in "Hitchy-Coo," subsequently co-star- 



CHANGES IN SCHEDULES 
RECEIVED AS WE GO TO PRESS 

Literary Digest Topics in Brief, with Lowell 
Thomas, will be heard only over NBC Eastern 
stations at 6:45, E. D. T., each week night. 
A second broadcast for a Western network will 
be given at 10:15, C. S. T. 



Beginning May 9, Tony Cabooch, Anheuser- 
Busch program's one-man show, will begin a 
new time schedule, changing from early Mon- 
day evening to 10:45 p. m., E. D. T., Saturday. 
Additional stations have been added as fol- 
low: WNAC, WEAN, WCAU, WMAL, WKBW, 
KLZ, KDYL, KHJ, KOIN, KFRC, KOL, KFPY. 



WLEX, now off the air, will return to activ- 
ity late in April as WAAB, with headquarters 
at Squantum, Mass., adjoining WNAC. 



ring with H. B. Warner in "Sleeping Partners." 
This success was followed by "As You Were," with 
Alice Delysia and Sam Bernard, and so marked was 
her success in this production that she was imme- 
diately rewarded with her own starring vehicles. In 
chronological order they were "The French Doll," 
"Little Miss Bluebeard," "Naughty Cinderella" and 
"Paris." 

% 

The March of Time. 

Dramatization of the outstanding news events 
of each week forms the basis of the "March of 
Time" program. In this novel form of presenting 
current events, a large cast of actors, supported by 
a symphony orchestra and special sound effects, 
bring each scene as near as possible to reality. The 
program varies from other news broadcasts in that 
it seeks to restore reported incidents to their orig- 
inal forms. News is selected by the editors of 
"Time," however, on the basis of its importance 
rather than of its dramatic possibilities, and em- 
bellishments for sheer dramatic effect are not in- 
dulged in. 

The music, which serves as a "curtain" between 
each episode, is selected and specially scored by 
Howard Barlow to provide appropriate atmosphere, 
while each scene is otherwise "set" by a narrator, 
the Voice of Time, who designates the time and lo- 
cality, and otherwise prepares the listener for the 
dramatized news event to follow. 

The program really consists of six to ten shows 
in one, depending upon the number of news events 
treated with, and a cast of fifteen to twenty peo- 
ple is utilized, exclusive of the orchestra. 

At least eleven hours a week are spent in re- 
hearsal — more, if it is necessary to make last-minute 
changes, due to last-minute news of great impor- 
tance coming in. The programs raise two major 
production problems: First, they require extraordi- 
narily complete details from the correspondents 
who report the items to be presented; second, they 
require unusual versatility on the part of the direc- 
tor, the cast and the musical director, who may fre- 
quently have scant time in which to prepare and re- 
hearse the programs. 

No effort or expense is spared by the producers 
of the programs to make each t scene authentic. In 
one event in which former Gov. Alfred E. Smith 
was a principal, the actor who impersonated him 
in the program interviewed him beforehand in 
order to be able to accurately imitate his speech and 
manner. In another program a scene in a church 
in Soviet Russia was presented. In order to create 
an authentic atmosphere the choir from a Greek 
Catholic church in New York was added to th? 
cast. The choir sang for only forty-five seconds, 
but the mood that was created made it worth while. 

in 

For ten consecutive weeks the National Radio 
Forum, arranged by the Washington Star and 
broadcast over CBS, will present each Saturday 
night at 9:30 a member of President Hoover's Cab- 
inet, who will tell the public about the method of 
operation and problems faced by his respective de- 
partment. 

"Canada on Parade," sponsored by General Mo- 
tors of Canada, will soon be on the air. Twenty- 
four Canadian stations and WJR of Detroit will 
carry this series, making it available to every sec- 
tion of Canada. The program will be of an hour's 
duration, from 9 to 10, local time, Friday evening, 
at CKX, CKLC, CFCY, CJCA, CJRW, CKPR, 
CFNB, CHNS, CKOC, CJGC, CKAC, CFCH, 
CNRO, CFLC, CHRC, CKCK, CFBO, CJCB, 
CKGW, CNRV, CFCT, CKY and CJGX, and at 
10 p. m. from CFQC and CHNS. 



May, 1031 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 7 



THE MARCH OF TIME CBS, FRIDAYS at 10:30 p. m., E. D. T. 




The "March ot Time" program over CBS every I riday evening at 10:30 o'clock, I.. I). T., presents outstanding news events of the week in dramatic 
form. In the upper left-hand corner is Roy E. Larsen, vice-president ,\\m\ general manager of Time Magazine, sponsors () | the program; in the upper 
right, Fred Smith, managing editor of the magazine, and creator of the program. Ai the lower left is Howard Barlow, musical director, and at the 
lower right, Arthur Pryor, Jr., dramatic director of the program. The center picture shows Director Pryor rehearsing a scene. 



Page 8 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



&y iWothjj eDriskr Stafford 



GAY, foot-tapping rhythm was wafting forth 
from the Louis Quinze console, which Mrs. 
Taylor, indulging her flair for the artistic, had 
embellished with two Chinese stoles, a bronze 
Buddha and a flock of china dogs; the radiator 
was hot and purring like a contented kitten, and 
Mr. Taylor, who loved his home, his wife and his 
radio, should have been happy. 

But he wasn't. He sat nervous and fidgety, 
the radio section of the Times upon his knee, and 
every few seconds turned a questioning and slight- 
ly irritated glance toward the superheterodyne, 
which was the pride of his life and the joy of his 
evenings at home. As the moments passed the 
glances became darker and more frequent, the easy- 
chair creaked ominously, and suddenly Mr. Taylor 
sat upright and glared at the innocent instrument 
of entertainment. Throwing down his paper, he 
exploded: 

"Ann, what the dickens is the matter with that 
music?" 

Mrs. Taylor, who had been wholly absorbed in 
laying out the hands for Tuesday's bridge lesson, 
turned her blonde head critically to one side, and 
listened with the professional attitude of Arnold 
Morgan sitting in judgment on an audition. 

"Why, it's just a poor orchestra. They're not 
on the hook-up," was her verdict. 

"It's not a poor orchestra," contradicted her 
husband, flatly. "It's a big orchestra. They 
haven't anything like that in local talent. Listen." 

There was a bit of patter and a familiar voice. 

"Didn't I tell you? It's Brokenshire. Of 
course, it's hook-up, but it sounds like a big, tin- 
pan parade. Do you suppose it's those confounded 
tubes again? And only last week I paid Harvey 
$3 for a complete new set. I thought we were 
all fixed for a year at least." 

Mr. Taylor regarded the china dogs with gloom, 
and his set with distaste. 

"Well, there isn't a particle of bass coming in, 
and it sounds all wiggly-like and distorted like the 
picture in the ads," said the feminine critic. "It 
certainly isn't good radio. Why don't you try 
another station?" 

"Station was all right last night. I'm going 
to call Harvey and make him come over and hear 
it. He's been stuck with some bad tubes, and 
I'm not going to put up with this kind of — " 

"Little White Lies" came to a dismal climax 
with a jangling of piano chords, and the disgruntled 
set-owner cocked his ear for the announcement. 

"Ladies and gentlemen, this program of Hamm's 
Harmonists has come to you by means of an elec- 
trical transcription." 

"Ha!" snarled Mr. Taylor, as he advanced upon 
the instrument with the stride of a grenadier. "So 
that's it, is it? Phonograph records! Well, good- 
bye, station, we're going away from here." He 
spun the dial viciously. "Any time I want to 
spend my evenings listening to canned music, I'll 
get KWKH, but I didn't expect it from an old 
reliable like you. Of all the confounded nerve!" 

In came a small studio orchestra, but the soft 
wail of the 'cello, the sonorous thump of the bass 
viol were all as perfect in tone as though the or- 
chestra were encamped upon the Taylors' daven- 
port with the leader in the Cogswell chair. 

"There, now, that's more like it," and, with a 




grunt of relief, Mr. Taylor resumed his paper, while 
his subconscious was soothed by the soft melody 
and the knowledge that all was right with his 
world. Some time later he startled Mrs. Taylor 
so that she dropped her cards, by hissing, apropos of 
nothing: "Phonograph records!" 

Should you perchance sit in your house by the 
side of the road with a weather ear alert for the 
reactions of Mr. Taylor and his brethren of the 
fraternity of radio listeners, you will be conscious 
of a growing rumbling of disapprobation in regard 
to what seemed, on the face of it, a grand and 
glorious idea. Half an hour's entertainment, 
planned by program experts and presented by well- 
known artists, all complete and recorded on a huge 
disc which may be sent hither and yon across the 
land, sounds like an ideal solution to problems of 
station managers and feature sponsors alike. But, 
in spite of the fact that they are dressed up with 
the new cognomen — electrical transcriptions — any 
one with his ear to the ground knows that to the 
seasoned listener they are still phonograph records. 
For some reason this stubborn fraternity doesn't 
seem to agree with Mr. Thorgersen, who, on Satur- 
day nights, is so fond of reminding us that "gone 
are ancient prejudices." 

In fact, the attitude of the nonconformists is 
very similar to that of the precocious child who 
was responsible for the historical utterance: 

"All right, have it your own way. It is broc- 
coli. But I calls it spinach." 

Even though the transcriptions are more per- 
fect mechanically than the one which so excited 
Mr. Taylor's wrath, and occasionally one hears a 
reproduction that only the most sensitive ear can 
distinguish from an original presentation, the 
prejudice is there, doubtless a hangover from the 
days when records were the stand-by of the small, 
unimportant station, and were played over and over 
until threadbare. However, there is another angle 
that seems to voice the objection of the majority 
who have become accustomed to the prodigal talent 
of the great chains. 

Mr. Taylor succeeded in getting himself tre- 
mendously stirred up on the subject, since imme- 
diately following his evening of annoyance he 
chanced upon several articles dealing with the great 
possibilities of the future of canned radio programs, 
and feeling that the whole structure of organized 
broadcasting was about to tumble about his ears, 
he took the time to pay a visit of protest to Johnny 
Fisk, radio editor of the Times. 

Johnny, unfortunately, was young, inclined to 



be enthusiastic over the big discs, and immediately 
struck the wrong note. 

"Why, man," he said, "it's marvelous. It's 
going to revolutionize radio. Now, take the small 
stations — " 

"No, you take 'em. I don't want 'em," said 
Mr. Taylor, sourly. "It's when I tune in on sta- 
tions like WJR, WSB and WLW, and find them 
all grinding out records at the same time, that I 
want to know what we are coming to." 

"But, Taylor, it's the same thing." 

"Yeah, same thing, only different. Don't you 
know it's the human element in radio that has 
made it what it is? And while we know our chain 
programs are rehearsed and timed to the second, 
they still manage to retain the spontaneous and 
impromptu attitude that appeals to the listener. 
I'd like to know where all the personalities of radio 
would be to-day if we had come to know them by 
means of records. Take dear, lovable, stuttering 
Roxy, for instance. Can you imagine canning him 
and all his funny little grunts and asides on a 
record? Why, back in the old Capitol Theater 
days that's what we listened for. It wasn't his 
entertainment, fine as it was, that drew thousands 
to him, it was the personality of the man that 
got over in his intimate little chats. If this thing 
goes on, the future generation won't know any 
more about the world of broadcasting than they 
do now about the legitimate theater." 

Mr. Fisk rubbed his nose reflectively and said: 
"I see there's something to your argument. I'm 
rather young at this game, and don't get the slant 
on radio personalities that you chaps have who 
have been tied to your sets for the past five or six 
years. You probably know more about these 
people than I do." 

"I think I do, and I'm proud of my judgment," 
said Mr. Taylor, firmly. "Getting away from 
records for a minute, though it fits in with the 
argument, do you know it's surprising how many 
of the radio entertainers whom I once regarded as 
my private property have gone to the top? And 
every blessed one of 'em attracted me by some 
little personal quirk that made me hunt them up 
when no one else seemed to have heard of them. 

"Here's Gene and Glenn, who just went on the 
hook-up this past winter. Of course, Ford and 
Glenn were known for years. But take this man 
Gene. I first heard him down at WLW when 
he was part of another team, and I had quite a 
time convincing my wife he was doubling as Jake. 
He used to go out to the ball games with the an- 
nouncer, and it was Jake's comments on the players 
that convinced me he was a real humorist. But 
when I look back I remember that nobody else 
seemed to think that boy had anything. 

"And way back years ago, before stock-market 
crashes and hard times, I got all steamed up over 



A J ay, 1 02 



WHAT'S ON THE AIK 



Page 9 



a chap playing piano at WJR. He was part of a 
team, Little and Small, and before long I was 
scurrying around the dial listening for that unusual 
touch on the keys that meant Jack Little. And 
now he's a chain artist. 

"I even take credit for discovering Rudy Vallee 
in our circle. It was months before a line had 
been printed about him that I heard him one night 
broadcasting from a night club. It was his an- 
nouncing that caught me first, and I was a month 
finding any one else who had heard him, or recog- 
nized that there was something different there. 

"Oh, yes, I almost forgot Bill Munday. I'm 
proud of my judgment there. I'm a long way 
from Atlanta, but I've always liked that station, 
and one night I caught this Southern drawl broad- 
casting a Georgia Tech game. I stayed by till I 
heard his name, and told my wife I had discovered 
a new football announcer. Ann said it was just 
that I liked Southern voices, but I said: 'No, he's 



got what McNamee has. He's so bubbling over 
with excitement and enthusiasm himself, he man- 
ages to get it over to the listener, and, besides, he 
knows football.' And when years afterward the 
unique Mr. Munday turns up as an NBC star, I 
am just as pleased as though I knew him personally. 
And there are a dozen others of national prom- 
inence that I've known since the days of crystal 
sets." 

"I think I see why you feel so strongly in regard 
to electrical transcriptions," said the editor. "I 
thought at first you were a delegate from the 
musicians' union, but it is apparently the human- 
interest side of radio that appeals to you." 

"Not altogether. I'm fond of good music, and 
play the violin a bit myself. I'm one of these 
happy persons with a catholic taste that can en- 
joy anything — so long as it's good — from slapstick 
to opera. I'll give you the records for soulless 
things like symphony orchestras. One doesn't ex- 



pect an oboe player in a symphony to get over to 
you the fact that he's a Sigma Chi, and would 
be a nice chap to have to dinner. Personally I 
don't think I'd like an oboe player. But my point 
is that each of these features that have made good 
got to me originally by projecting a real flesh-and- 
blood personality in a spontaneous manner over the 
air. And you can't do that by mechanical 
methods." 

Mr. Fisk tuned in the local station on the office 
set by his desk. To his great joy they heard the 
unmistakable voice of Rudy Vallee singing "Deep 
Night." 

"Now, I ask you," he demanded, "can you or 
anybody else tell me whether that is Rudy or a 
record?" 

"Sure," answered the obdurate Mr. Taylor. 
"It's ten o'clock in the morning, and Rudy's still 
in bed. Besides, it might be Will Osborne. But 
I won't argue with you. I still calls it spinach." 




JAMES M. BECK, 
who WOt prosecutor in 
the opening program of 
this unique series. 

HISTORICAL offenders 
to the bar of justice 
Trials of History scries, wh 
late in March. The trials 
Sunday night from 10:15 
Daylight Time. 

The scries opened with 
edict Arnold, condemned 
Americans as a despicable 
ence Darrow defending the 
ccution was conducted by 

The second notorious c 
to face the radio jury w 




are being returned 
n the new Famous 
ich was inaugurated 
arc broadcast each 
to 10:45, Eastern 

a hearing for Bcn- 
by generations of 
traitor, with Clar- 
traitor. The pros- 
James M. Beck, 
haracter of history 
as Napoleon Bona- 



CLARENCE DARROW, 
ubo defended Benedict 
Arnold in the first of 
"The Famous Trials in 
History." 

parte, accused of the murder of the Due 
d'Enghien. Arthur Garfield Hays acted as 
prosecutor, and Dudley Field Malone defended 
the Corsican, and a distinguished group of 
Congressmen, jurists and private citizens acted 
as jurors. 

The trials are conducted in the NBC Times 
Square studios, and are broadcast over a net- 
work associated with WEAF. Other historical 
personages who, it is expected, will be retried in 
the radio scries, are Jesse James, Captain Kidd, 
Joan d'Arc, Marie Antoinette, Captain Drey- 
fus, Lord Essex and many others. 




ARTHUR PRYOR. 
CBS each week-day ill 

8 and 11:15 p. in. 



UNDER the leadership of Arthur Pryor 
himself, the Crcmo Military Band — thir- 
ty-two pieces strong — brings a fifteen-minute 
program of martial music via radio through 
more than sixty associated CBS broadcasting 
stations every week-day night. 

Over the air comes a roll of drums — then 
twenty words of advertising talk — another 
ruffle by the lad with the drumsticks, a>ul 

instantly a band cuts Incise with the well- 
known strains of Sousa's "High-school Cadets." 
Hear those brasses! I low the piccolo cuts 
across the clarinets! Catch the rumble and 

growl of the b.iss drum below it all! Uncon- 
sciously you straighten up, your shoulders 140 
back, your chest comes out. If you had with 
you now that chap who tried to trim you 
on a business deal to-day what you could 
do to him! But there's .mother d.iv coming - 
and you don't feel tired any more. 

That's .in epitome of what Arthur Pryor's 
Crcmo Military Band is doing for America 
i\ nii;hls a week over the WABC-Columbi 1 
COast-tO-COaSI network. Martial music played 
l>v an unsurpassable band was what the client 
called for, and thousands of listeners are 
writing in to say that's what they .ire getting, 
and that for them it's a radio (onic, 



If" 



■&'*#&* 



If* 






*& 



1P-* 



WHEN, on Saturday afternoon, 
May 23, at about 3 o'clock, a 
fleet of 672 army fighting planes — 
the largest air fleet ever assembled in 
the New World — sweeps down upon 
New York City in battle array, the 
ensuing maneuvers will be described 
to the radio audience of both CBS 
and NBC the nation over. Both 
from airplanes accompanying the ar- 
my aerial fleet and from vantage 
points on the city's skyline, the chains 
will use a dozen announcers to depict 
the amazing scene to the radio public. 
The night before (May 22, at mid- 
night, E. D. T.) the same corps of an- 
nouncers will have told America of 
the army's night attack on the city, 
when great bomber planes will shower 
flares over the water front in a simu- 
lated attack. May 22, at 11:30 p. 
M., E. D. T., Brigadier General Fau- 
lois, in command of the Army Air 
Week maneuvers, will explain their 
purpose from a military viewpoint 
over NBC hook-uos. Local stations 
will carry stories of Chicago, Boston 
and Philadelphia demonstrations. 






** 





Page 10 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



KedfcneJ Views and Kevfews, 



Ramblin' Roun' Radiolan' 

With the Red-headed Music Maker 



Cincinnati, O. — Hello, Folks! How are 
you all this evenin'? Been hoppin' 'round like 
a Mexican jumpin' bean lately — hither and 
thither, mostly thither! Left Hot Springs for 
Chicago, then Detroit, St. Louis, and now 
down here — Cincinnati — a magic name, a hap- 
py, music-loving people, a great city! 

I came here for the first time in show busi- 
ness in 1917, appearing in small-time vaude- 
ville with my own act, "The Singing Xylo- 
phonist," at the then very old Empress Theater 
out on Vine Street. Recall stopping at the 
Stagg Hotel and eating every evening meal 
that week at a chile parlor near the theater at 
ten cents a meal (five cents for the hot dog 
and five cents for the bowl o' chile). Came 
back a year or two later at the same theater 
with the same act, but "chair-carred" it in 
that time as a member of a burlesque company. 
Then came radio, and in I came again, appear- 
ing this time at the gorgeous U. S. Playing- 
card Station, WSAI. Immediately dubbed it 
"The Pinochle Palace," for it was a palace 
compared to most studios in those days. Six 
months or so later buzzed in again, to camp 
this time at Crosley's \CLW. Believe it was 
this trip that Powell Crosley gave me his own 
personal portable Crosley set to carry away 
with me in my ramblins. In and out of this 
radio-interested city so much at these two 
studios during the early days of radio that 
I kinda lost track — in and out on business, 
too, for this is the home office of Wurlitzer's 
and used to be of Brunswick. Many, many 
personal appearances in Victor and Brunswick 
stores autographing records — one personal ap- 
pearance at Pogue's with one thousand folks 
in the audience and five hundred more trying 
to crowd in. Once again at Pogue's with the 
same results. One personal appearance at Mu- 
sic Hall with over three thousand fans coming 
out to see me. Then topped it all off about 
two years ago by headlining the then brand- 
new E. F. Albee Theater, one of America's 
finest theaters, appearing that week to an es- 
timated seventy-five thousand radio fans. How 
can I help loving Cincinnati? It's been mighty 
good to me. Yes, suh! 

Cincinnati's been good to a lot of folks. 
There's Haven Gillespie, one of America's 
greatest song writers, who hails from Coving- 
ton, across the river. Little Jack Little has 
his home out in Hyde Park. Ben Alley and 
Helen Nugent, CBS artists, are Cincy home 
folks. Jerry Litchkoff, pioneer radio editor, 
still on the Post. Paul Greene, now the 
CBS genial "old master" on things technical, 
built the original WSAI station, managed and 
announced there, for several pioneer years. Then 
there's Fred Smith, one of the greatest radio- 
idea men this country has produced. One 
can't think of radio Cincinnati without think- 
ing of Fred. He was manager-director-an- 
nounccr of WLW for five or six pioneer years. 
WLW can thank Fred Smith a lot for the po- 
sition it now holds. Fred has continued to 
do big things in radio since leaving Cincy. 
Connected with Time Magazine, he originated 
and produced "Newscasting" and "Newsact- 
ing" for them. Then just a week or so ago 
came the new "March of Time" program over 
CBS, a dramatization of memorable events of 
the week — a new kind of reporting of the 
news. Of course, Fred originated the idea, 
worked it out and writes the entire show. 
It will make radio history — watch it! Fred, 
too, worked with me during 1929 on the Ma- 
jestic Hour, and was responsible for much 
of the continuity, publicity and ideas that 
made this hour outstanding. Yes, and Cincy 
is the home of What's on tup. Air — we won't 
forget that! Likewise, we can't forget that 
one of America's greatest individual stations, 
WLW-WSAI, the home of the Crosley 
set, is in Cincy. Overlooking the hills and 
covering a full floor atop the Crosley plant 
this powerful station is a beautiful workshop. 
It is one of the most efficiently laid-out 
plants to date — thanks to Joe Chambers, the 
twenty-scven-year-old technical supervisor, 
who installed the 50,000 Watt Transmitter. 
Ralph Haburton, the pioneer of the station, 
tells me that Scger Ellis has just joined the 
staff — that "Salt and Peanuts" arc popular (it 
used to be Salt and Pepper in vaudeville, but 



Salt became attached to Peanuts. That left 
Pepper out in the cold, and put Peanuts "in 
the bag." Then the old Salt married Peanuts, 
and they've been stickin' together ever since). 
That Don Becker, of the Continuity Staff, is 
the last word on playin' a ukulele, and his new 
"Rhapsody for the Ukulele" makes one's Rum- 
ba blood boil. The McCormick Fiddlers, 
Bradley Kincaid, Glenn Sisters, Brooks and 
Ross and "Old Man Sunshine" are all goin' 
great and saturatin' the ether plenty from 
the "nation's station." More power to 'em! 
By the way, the radio pillow has arrived, 
intended mostly for hospitals and Pullman 
cars. Still it will come in mighty handy for 
the auto tourist in "Mood Indigo" on his back 
under his broken-down calliope forty miles 
from nowhere, gettin' a "Cheerful Little Ear- 
full" as he gets his tearful little eyefull — ■ 
Awful! Surprising how backgammon and 
"games" have cut into the sale of playing- 
cards. The times do change, and one must 
change with them. Hairpins and hairnets 
are selling strong again. Talked to a bird the 
other day that admitted he was one of the 
chosen few who could listen to the radio and 
read at the same time. No foolin'; in the con- 
versation he said, "Why, sure; now, last night, 
for instance, I was listenin' to Amos 'n' Andy 
and readin' the funny paper at the same time." 
Was in the Chicago office of the Broadcasting 
Checking Bureau talking to Nate Caldwell a 
few days ago when a fellow across the hall 
"goes snap" and tries to throw himself out 
the window. The same day a bum comes to 



the back door and the maid gives him a chunk 
o' apple pie. I go by the door just in time 
to hear him crab, "Who ever heard o' servin' 
apple pie without some cheese?" Depression is 
evidently bringing on a stack of Prosperity 
Model Bums. The biggest song hit in the 
country to-day, "When Your Hair Has 
Turned to Silver I Will Love You Just the 
Same," written by Peter DeRose as a tribute 
of honor to May Singhi Breen, who is Mrs. 
Peter DeRose Breen in private life. I'm surely 
tickled about it, 'cause I presented Breen and 
DeRose on the air for the first time as man 
and wife. In some of these new color tele- 
vision sets you can't tell whether it's "The 
Stars and Stripes Forever" or the announcer's 
necktie. The field is now ripe for "Spot 
Broadcasting in Person." With the proper ad- 
vertising and publicity local tie-up, and with the 
right national radio personality, the results are 
measured and unlimited. Musicians around St. 
Louis aren't makin' rehearsal notations of med- 
leys in their date-books any more. Bill Jones, 
a 'cello player, had domestic trouble. The big 
blow-up came when she, in rummaging around 
his personal effects for evidence, found this 
notation in his date-book: "April 4 — 'Mar- 
gie' — then 'Black Eyes' — then back to last 
eight bars." 

Well, here's the results of that impromptu, 
unpublicized broadcast of mine from KTHS 
that I told you about last month — 2 57 letters 
from thirty-eight States, five Provinces of 
Canada and Hilo, Hawaii. Arnoux won the 
bet, but I'm still happy! Plenty for now. 
I'll be seein' you next month with a little 
R-Tickle about Detroit. So until then, see 
you pretty soon — pretty soooon — pretty 
so-o-o-o-o-o-o-n. Nite Owl. 
Sincerely, 

Wendell Hall. 



World's 



Fair 



Radio Center 



Joseph Ator's Chicago Radio Chatter 



THE theme song for the wise-cracking 
Ben Bernie and his orchestra properly 
should be "The Anvil Song." For Papa Ancel 
— that's Ben's real name — swung his sledge 
in a blacksmith shop under Brooklyn Bridge 
on New York's roaring East Side. Grandpa 
Ancel had been a blacksmith before his son, 
and for three generations before him the 
sturdy arm of an Ancel had tended the vil- 
lage forge in the family's European home. 

It was in that cacophony of clanging steel 
and rumbling traffic overhead that young Ben 
put bow to his first violin. That he re- 
ceived much encouragement from his father 
is a matter of doubt, for the worthy black- 
smith had other ambitions for his son. He 
intended him to be an engineer. 

He very nearly accomplished his plan. Ben 
went to the Columbia University School of 
Mines and Engineering and to Cooper Insti- 
tute, and it was not until he ran into calculus 
that he decided that he'd rather spend his 
life deciphering musical scores than quadratic 
surds. 

So at seventeen we find our hero demon- 
strating $4.98 violins in a New York de- 
partment store, explaining, as he did so, to 
slightly baffled prospective customers, that if 
his music annoyed them, he suffered even 
more himself. A vaudeville booking-agent 
chanced to hear his patter one day. He per- 
suaded Ben to try out at an amateur night 
in a neighborhood theater, and subsequently 
gave him booking over a long string of one- 
night stands. 

Ben started out to treat his audience to 
classical music. A lanky mountaineer in an 
Ozark 'opry-house' cured him of that. The 
young musician was in the midst of a dim- 
cult selection when the mountaineer, a rude 
fellow with no regard for the finer things of 
life, loosed a stream of tobacco juice with 
deadly accuracy from a box, which landed 
with a resounding "tunk" on the bridge of 
Ben's fiddle. 

He walked off the stage in a rage. Then 
he walked back and told the mountaineer 
what he thought of him. As he soared into 
the higher realms of irate fancy in his de- 
scription of the yokel's shortcomings, the 
house roared with glee. That convinced Ben 
that some one else could uplift the musical 



taste of America. He set out to amuse it by 
droll comment on its foibles, using his violin 
thenceforth much as Will Rogers long used 
his lariat. 

He climbed up to the "big time" of vaude- 
ville. His partner on that climb was Phil 
Baker. They played together from 1910 until 
the war separated them. Then he got a new 
ambition when he heard Paul Whiteman lead 
his orchestra at the old Palais Royale in New 
York. 

He organized his own band. It made a 
national reputation at the Hotel Roosevelt 
in New York. Last fall he came to Chicago 
to open the new College Inn, a night club 
which had seen Isham Jones start on the 
road to fame in an earlier day. 

Within a month, Bernie had become an 
institution in Chicago night life. In addi- 
tion to his nightly broadcasts — WBBM — he is 
on the Columbia chain at 10 P. M. (C. S. T.) 
every Thursday. 



WBBM and its newspaper affiliate, the Chi- 
cago Illustrated Times, staged a radio spell- 
ing-bee recently with the microphone set 
before the young contestants. 



Candidate for the Believe It or Not Club — 
Leon Bloom, distinguished pianist and leader 
of the Columbia Farm network concert or- 
chestra, who named his daughter May Blossom 
Bloom. 



Frank E. Mullen, director of agriculture 
for the National Broadcasting Company, re- 
cently was given the added duties of adviser 
on all religious and educational programs 
originating at the chain's Chicago head- 
quarters. 

Sg 

The speech department of Purdue Univer- 
sity at Lafayette, Ind., has been conducting 
a radio drama contest along the lines of the 
conventional play contests. N. B. C. officials, 
who declare it is the first attempt within 
their knowledge to enroll amateur writers 



of broadcast sketches in competition, have ar- 
ranged to broadcast the winning play over 
WENR. 

% 

WGN conducts a "Port of the Missing" 
every noon for persons whose relatives have 
lost trace of them in Chicago. One of the 
hardest tasks of the studio hostesses is ex- 
plaining to forlorn urchins and doting 
dowagers that lost dogs are not eligible for 
the program. 

Bobby Griffin, KYW announcer, recently 
ballyhooed over the air some civic pride 
statistics to the effect that the average Chi- 
cagoan has only about one chance in four 
hundred, or some such figure, of being held 
up during the year. A bandit "took" him 
for $50 that same week. 



Alma Sioux Scarberry, newspaper woman 
and fiction writer, is the author of a serial 
radio play which WENR, new N. B. C. out- 
let in Chicago, puts on the air at 8:45 P. M. 
Tuesdays and 8:30 p. M. Thursdays, for 
fifteen-minute periods. The play, "Girl Re- 
porter," is based on Miss Scarberry 's adven- 
tures as a newspaper "sob sister." It may 
go on the chain later. 



:i 



The fellows who heaved the grapefruit at 
Rudy Vallee might take a second thought 
before casting anything in the direction of 
Arthur Oberg, who has, in common with 
Rudy, at least a tenor voice and blond hair. 
He stands six feet four inches, weighs 23 5 
pounds, puts the shot, is a broadjumper, a 
gymnast and a clever basket-ball player, and 
spends his Sunday mornings in the choir- 
loft of the First Congregational Church at 
Evanston, Chicago suburb. He is on the air 
from 11:15 A. m. to noon each Tuesday over 
WGN. 



Alma Tramontin, who sings leading roles 
in the Kraft Theater Party over WMAQ 
from 8 to 8:30 P. M. every Thursday, re- 
ceived her first training in voice in an 
Alaskan convent. She was born in Juneau, 
her father's headquarters in his profession 
as a mining engineer. 

He sent her to a convent near the town, 
and during the long, cold winter evenings 
one of the nuns discovered that Alma's voice 
had unusual qualities. She renewed her vocal 
studies with enthusiasm when she came to 
the continental United States a few years 
ago, and, following experience in light opera 
and on the concert stage, entered radio work. 

Charles Sears, who plays opposite her, spent 
his boyhood at Rantoul, 111., where his father 
is an instructor in aviation at the army flying- 
school. Coming to Chicago as a young vocal 
student, he wondered why so many charming 
ladies and distinguished-looking gentlemen 
bowed to him on Chicago's Michigan Boule- 
vard. Presently he discovered on meeting 
Mario Chamlee that he was a double of the 
famous star of the Metropolitan Opera Com- 
pany. 

■;: 

Chaunccy Parsons, who sings on the Farm 
and Home Hour and other N. B. C. fea- 
tures, claimed the title of radio's church- 
singingest tenor. Here is the roster of de- 
nominations for whom he has sung at one 
time in his career: Methodist, Presbyterian, 
Roman Catholic, Baptist, Christian Science, 
Congregational, Friends, Christian, Episco- 
palian and Jewish synagogues. 

He sang in Billy Sunday's revival shows 
and on the stage in "Artists and Models," 
where he took the parts of a cantor and a 
cardinal in a sketch based on the history of 
music. He went overseas during the war, 
where he earned the title of the "John Mc- 
Cormick of the A. E. F.," and returned to 
break into radio in the well-nigh prehistoric 
days at KDKA in Pittsburgh. 

He includes at least one hymn or sacred 
song in each of his Farm and Home pro- 
grams, and that number always brings him 
his bigegst batch of fan mail, much of it 
from the members of congregations for whom 
he has sung, scattered from Pueblo, Col., his 
boyhood home, to New York City. He 
continues his church work too. 



May. T03 1 



WHAT'S OX THE A I II 



rape 11 




CAPTAIN BEAN and COLONEL COFFEE, the 
"Two Oldtirrcrs" .11 W'TMS, arc favorites in the Mil- 
waukee station's area. 



THE ANNOUNCERS AT VGAR, CLEVELAND— Fred Borgcrhoff, 

Fred Ripley, Bcrnie Strang and Steve Cisler (from left to right) — display 

the quality in their faces which is making WGAR known as "Cleve- 
land's Friendly Station." 



A. AM It K \i T is the popular hostess 11 WCKY, 

Covington, Ky. Moreover, sin- is that Station's well- 
known "Crinoline Girl," heard Mondays at 7:45. 



THE ILIMA ISLANDERS, staff Hawaiian troupe of Station WTIC, arc foremost 
exponents in radio of the music of their native land. Here is hoping that some eve- 
ning the WEAF-WTIC. synchronization will flow reversely, and the Islanders will 
be heard on the chain. 



v thci 




THE JOHNSTON MINSTRELS arc a headline feature of WTMJ, hut unfortunately 
cir May schedule is not yet available. 



Page 12 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1937. 



Jookfno^ ^roudi' && ^yJudfoscope 



One of the advantages of living on Long 
Island is that on one side of the island you 
can see the sound, and on the other hear the 
sea. — New York World. 



"I once knew an artist who painted a cob- 
web on the ceiling so realistically that the 
maid spent hours trying to get it down." 

"Sorry, dear, I just don't believe it." 

"Why not? Artists have been known to 
do such things." 

"Yes, but not maids!" — Selected. 



Frank Knight's verbal Waterloo, in the form 
of the phrase "tawny tiger," came recently 
as he was enacting his role in Columbia's 
"Arabesque." The usually precise Knight's 
tongue slipped and the words emerged as "tiny 
tawger"! Which recalls the fear of Alex- 
ander Wollcott, "Early Bookworm," that he 
should some day refer to himself as "Burly 
Hookworm." 



Pierre Brugnon, Evening in Paris master of 
ceremonies, has, within a comparatively short 
time, won for himself a following on the air 
which, at times, threatens to surpass even that 
of the renowned Chevalier. 

Brugnon is a tenor. He is also a delightful 
Frenchman, despite the fact that he wasn't 
born in France! 

Why "de spite"? 



One of the oldest orchestras on the WABC 
air is that of Harry Tucker, who, before com- 
ing to New York, won fame in Florida for his 
unusual orchestrations for string instruments. 

Harry plays regularly from the Hotel Bar- 
clay, and claims the record of being the oldest 
WABC band playing from a remote point 
(away from the studios). 



EXCELSIOR! 

He was a tall, gawky young man, who had 
come to Columbia studios seeking an audition. 
He was turned over to Minnie Blauman, who 
sometimes arranges such matters. 

"What do you do?" 

"I'm a tenor," the young man told her. 
"I'm the highest tenor in the world. I sing 
better than some, and not as good as most, 
but I sure sing higher!" 

P. S. — He didn't get the job. 



THEY LIKE THE BANDS. 

The wisdom of the sponsors of Arthur Pry- 
ors' Cremo Military Band, which is heard six 
nights a week at 8 o'clock, over CBS stations, 
is revealed in the results of a questionnaire 
sent out by the United States Office of Edu- 
cation. , It was addressed to schools in twenty- 
five States. Pupils were asked to check the 
type of radio music they most enjoyed, 
whether band, orchestra, voice or piano. The 
ratings revealed by the replies were: Band, 100 
per cent.; orchestra, 97 per cent.; voice, 92 
per cent.; piano, 80 per cent. 



When friends asked Marion McAfee, Co- 
lumbia soprano, how she could nerve herself to 
undergo an operation (as she recently did) 
with only a local anaesthetic, and with her 
eyes open, Marion replied: 

"After what I've watched in hospitals, that 
was nothing." 

"What do you mean, 'watched in hospitals'?" 
they asked. 

Whereupon Marion explained that she had 
trained to be a nurse, and was midway through 
her apprenticeship when she decided she would 
rather sing for her living. 



Ernest W. Naftzger, impressario of Colum- 
bia's "Something for Every One" broadcasts, 
has just celebrated his second anniversary on 
the air. 

Statistics supplied by Naftzger indicate that 



he has given away more coffee and cake to 
early morning radio artists than any one else 
in the broadcasting field. Among other things 
Naftzger reports that the artist traffic between 
kitchen and studio (he has his own broadcast- 
ing studio in his East Sixty-seventh Street 
home) has been so heavy during the fiscal 
twenty-four months that he has had to replace 
the linoleum three times. 

Following his anniversary broadcast an ar- 
dent radio fan wrote Naftzger: 

"Congratulations on your anniversary. Your 
program is fine and your jokes are getting 
worse fast." 




When Otto Gray parades his Oklahoma 
Cowboy band before the NBC microphones, 
he brings the "real McCoy" in Western enter- 
tainment. The group was organized in Still- 
water, Okla., seven years ago, and made its 
radio debut through KFRU, Bristow. 



SHOOTING STARS. 

Announcer Don Ball is a bear for exercise; 
hatless, Ball runs, rather than walks or taxies, 
to remote points from which Columbia broad- 
casts. Freddie Rich, the orchestra leader, tax- 
ies any distance more than half a city block. 
Norman Brokenshire prefers walking unless 
his own car is near by. Ted Husing just 
adores taxis. He once took one from the Co- 
lumbia studios to the Forest Hills tennis sta- 
dium! 

Summing up: a majority of radio artists, an- 
nouncers and other performers have established 
homes or apartments within a few blocks of 
the studios. Eighty per cent, of them hate 
to travel any great distance (five blocks to 
fifty miles) during radio series, fearing they 
will be late for a broadcast. 



Irene Bordoni, piquant French comedienne 
heard in the role of "The Coty Playgirl" over 
CBS Sunday nights, is thrilled over her new 
venture. 

"It eze zo wonderful," she exclaims in her 
delightful French accent, "I hope zat ra-deo 
will like me in ze same beeg way I like ra-deo. 
I've never before done thes dramatique part 
before thes 'mike' of yours." 

Miss Bordoni's entire personality is distinctly 
and typically Gallic. In her home she speaks 
only French. 

When she travels she takes her entire staff 
of servants along. She owns three luxuriously 
appointed homes — one on East Seventy-eighth 
Street, just off Park Avenue, another in a 
Paris suburb, and a third on the Riviera. It 
took her five years to completely furnish her 
New York residence. She is actually a home 
body, and dislikes appearing in public. 



m 



Last week, as Jesse Crawford was leaving the 
photograph itudios with Mrs. Crawford and 
Jessie Darlene, their daughter, who is eight 
and very, very observing, the group passed by 
the Paramount Theater, and little Jessie rec- 
ognized a huge painting of her daddy on 
the billboard. She scrutinized it for about two 
minutes and then, jumping up and down and 
clapping her hands in the midst of a typical 
Times Square matinee crowd, screamed at the 
top of her voice: 

"Looka daddy, looka daddy, he's all sun- 
burned in that picture!" 

And when the crowd discovered that the en- 
tire Crawford family was in its midst . . . 
well, the elder Crawford was all "burnt up" 
out of the picture. 



"Gee, I wish I was that Lombardo fellow!" 
a young girl sitting in Studio 5 of the Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System was heard to re- 
mark just as the popular dance orchestra maes- 
tro concluded another of his Robert Burns 
half-hours. 



If you were Guy Lombardo, little girl, you 
would get up at ten in the morning; begin 
rehearsing new selections by eleven, and con- 
tinue rehearsing until three or four in the 
afternoon. After a possible three or four 
hours for matters of business, you would spend 
maybe a half-hour dining; rush into your 
evening clothes and to the Hotel Roosevelt to 
play until about two o'clock in the morning. 
With this routine varied on Monday by ris- 
ing at eight instead of ten, and with the 
inclusion of the Panatela broadcast. 

And, little girl, do you still wish that you 
were that Lombardo fellow? 



It is common enough for a broadcast to re- 
ceive congratulations after it has occurred, 
but there is an element of news in the recep- 
tion of close to thirty congratulatory tele- 
grams prior to an official premiere. That 
happened in the case of "The March of Time," 
a new Columbia feature. An audition that 
amounted to a preview was sent by wire to 
all of the stations of the network in the af- 
ternoon with audiences limited to station per- 
sonnel, newspaper men and other guests in the 
various cities. The telegrams, most of them 
from radio editors, were received before the 
first real broadcast of "The March of Time" 
went on the air. 

"The March of Time," incidentally, needs 
the service of twoscore actors and technicians 
in addition to a symphony orchestra. Rehear- 
sals for the program, which is sponsored by 
Time Magazine, consume almost twice the 
usual time because of changes in the continuity 
necessitated by inclusion of last-minute news 
happenings. 



In April, WTIC received six letters ac- 
knowledging reception from fans in Paris, 
France, and that one day's mail contained 
twenty-six letters from people who had heard 
WTIC programs in New Zealand. That's 
thirty-five hundred miles eastward and eight 
thousand miles westward. 




Studio Hostess — Now, Matilda, I want you 
to show us what you can do to-night. We 
have a few very special guests coming in for 
a musical evening. 

Maid — Well, ma'am, I ain't done no singin' 
to speak of for years, but if you-all insists 
upon it you can put me down for "The Holy 
City." 



Studio story-telling is occupying the time of 
radio thespians at Columbia System studios 
these between-program times. 

Tom Tarrant, the noted "blackout" theatri- 
cal writer, whose "gags" and stories have been 
dramatized for Earl Carroll's Vanities and Shu- 
bert Shows, is now producing the "minute 
dramas" for the Tuesday night Henry-George 
half-hours. 

Tarrant has been telling the one about the 
lady in the department store, who for half an 
hour had the clerk pulling down from high 
shelves hundreds upon hundreds of varied de- 
signed and colored blankets. Finally the clerk 
piled upon the counter all but the last 
blanket. 

"Why, there's one blanket left up there," 
the customer complained. 

"That is exactly the same as the one I 
showed you with the blue border. Now that 
you've seen all our blankets, which one do 
you wish to bin?" 

"Oh, I'm not going to buy; I'm just look- 
ing for a lady friend of mine," was the reply. 

"Well, madam," replied the clerk, "if you 
really think your lady friend is in that last 
blanket up there, I'll take it down for you!" 



In his spare time Nick (Daddy) Dawson, 
of Columbia's clever skit, "Daddy and Rollo," 
does a bit of portrait painting. He says that 
although he's been trying for years, he has 
never been able to play an ocharina or. do card 
tricks, although he could sing if his friends 
around the studios would only let him. They 



never have, and late reports indicate that they 
never will. 

Once he took a job as scenery painter with 
a group of barnstormers. They lost one mem- 
ber of the cast by the wayside (he married 
a farmer's daughter, or something, Nick says), 
and Nick suddenly awoke one morning to find 
that he was an actor. 

Two years later Dawson gave up acting to 
become the press representative for a circus, 
which finally led to the advertising business. 
The World War ended this career, and between 
trenches Dawson found time to produce shows 
for the doughboys, which flourished and con- 
tinued until Dawson was badly wounded. 



Lee Morse's voice is as big as she is small. 
She weighs sixteen ounces less than a hun- 
dred pounds. She was born in Tennessee; 
raised in Texas, while her father has a parish 
in Allen, Okla. Her parent, the Rev. P. J. 
Taylor, is one of the eight original "Texas 
Rangers" — only three survive. For two years 
Lee Morse headlined the Pantages Circuit with- 
out a single week's layoff. Appeared oppo- 
site Raymond Hitchcock in "Hitchy-Koo," 
and later was featured in "Artists and Mod- 
els." An exclusive artist with the Columbia 
System, she is heard with the Van Heusen 
program every Friday. Has written over two 
hundred songs, including "The Tune that 
Never Grows Old." Excellent guitar strum- 
mer. In spare time she fabricates poems and 
short stories. Takes daily horseback rides. 
Reads books until 3 or 4 a. m., and then 
sleeps until noon. Has keen sense of humor. 
She is too impatient to sit in a card game. 
Her favorite actress is Greta Garbo. Has made 
over 23 5 phonograph recordings. She speaks 
any number of Indian dialects. 



Did you know that: — 

Norman Brokenshire, the "it" announcer, 
is back in New York following many weeks 
of Florida-Havana sunshine? 

You shouldn't miss Harry Salter's special 
comedy arrangement of "All the King's 
Horses"? 

Guy Lombardo rehearses his Robert Burns 
Panatela Band all afternoon Mondays? 

The "Shadow's" new studio disguise ac- 
tually frightened some of the guests last 
Thursday in the Detective Story half-hour? 

Chester Tallman, the baritone, is six feet 
two inches tall? 

A listener has requested that "A Peach of 
a Pair" be played on the Sunkist Musical 
Cocktail broadcast which comes from Los 
Angeles over Columbia. The program cu- 
riously is sponsored by the California Orange- 
growers Exchange? 

Brad. Browne, he of the Premier Chefs, 
writes more than fifty original songs each 
year? 

Lorna Fantin, Old Gold Character Reader, 
is only twenty-four? 

Ted Husing is so fidgety that he can not 
stay in one place longer than ten minutes — 
unless he's broadcasting? 

Ninety per cent, of the announcers you 
hear have to read what is prepared for them 
by somebody else? 

Herbert Glover, director of CBS Remote 
Broadcasting, travels mostly by air? 

For the first time in six years, Ann Brae, 
WABC's "Miss Mytfine," is working in radio 
without her husband? 

Mary and Bob, radio's original sweethearts, 
have written a book about themselves? 

Ida Bailey Allen has her own set of studios 
at 18 19 Broadway, which are sufficiently large 
to satisfy any ten small broadcasting station-,? 

California broadcasts piped to you locally 
sound deeper in tone because of the capacity 
influence of the wires which carry them three 
thousand miles? 

Charlotte Harriman, known to a wide pub- 
lic through frequent appearances over Colum- 
bia stations, collects old silver as a hobby? 

Kg 




Eddie East and Ralph Dumke, NBC's Sis- 
ters of the Skillet, weigh almost five hun- 
dred pounds between them. Each tips the 
beam at a figure far in excess of two hundred. 



May, 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 13 



jlwJejje @i'6wroi'd 





PIERRE BRUGNON, master of cere- 
monies for "Evening in Paris," is a na- 
tive of New York, but his "French ac- 
cent" delights his audience. 

There is one important part of the 
"Evening in Paris" program which is 
sent direct from the Rue de la Paix — 
the late fashion notes. Every woman 
listener is grateful for this bit of Paris- 
ian "clothes gossip," which is cabled 
from Paris especially for this program. 



OUW 



/men. 

Quert ftimourvcev 



feVtOK 



v-^. 



Keyboards fascinate JESSE 
CRAWFORD, Royal's Poet of 
the Organ, who is heard over 
CBS Sundays at 10 P. M. Even 
at home he faces a keyboard, a 
typewriter keyboard. He's writ- 
ing short stories now. Left to 
right — Louis A. Witten (CBS 
guest announcer), Mrs. Jesse 
Crawford and the "Poet." 



"Mr. and Mrs. F. C. H.," who are ANN and 
PHIL BRAE in private life, found that you can 
lead a duck to music, but you can't make it sing. 
Other difficulties in the lives of these impractical 
show people are straightened out for Columbia 
listeners every Tuesday, Thursday and Saturday 
evenings from 5:30 to 5:45 o'clock, E. D. T. 



TTO 



&36^ 



"the little girl with the big voice," is heard 
regularly in Cathedral Hour, grand opera con- 
certs, Savino Tone Picture and Philco con- 
cert periods. She is one of the CBS artists at- 
tached regularly to WABC. 

She lacks an inch of five feet, and weighs 
i 1 5 pounds. Vasa's father was a singer, her 
mother a pianist, and her cousin, Ronald 
Murat, violinist. When she was eight she be- 
gan reading music, and at twelve w.is giving 
concert piano recitals. Her professional singing 
career began in earnest in 1926, when she went 
to work at the Rivoli Theater in New York. 



(CJCLQW' Q. Guest (M\d. 



©duohler [ 





Here is UlOthcr glimpse of "THE 
SHADOW," who haunts the Detective 

Story Magazine program, and has had thou- 
sands of radio fans seeking clues to his 
identity in a prize contest. 



"It takes .1 heap o' livin' to make a house a home, 
. . ." arc the most famous words ever written by 
liDGAR A. GUI ST, extoller of the homely virtues and 
known as America's poet-laureaie of the common 
people. There is no doubt that Eddie, who is heard 
on the Graham-Paige program over CBS every Sun- 
da) evening, practices the philosophy that he preaches 
— as witness this charming and recent photograph of 
the poet and his daughter Janet, and two of the house- 
hold pets, at home in Detroit, Mich. 




(§)osVe (Qlrcv^rv 

revives the character of "The 
Town Clown" on the programs 
of the McAleer Polishers, heard 
every Wednesday night. He also 
writes the script for this pro- 
gram. 



A "lightning quick" change artist 
is ELSIE MAE GORDON, perhaps 
best known to radio listeners as 
"Maybclle" in the Saturday night 
"Showboat" melodramas. Here she 
is as a tomboy, a French dancer, a 
small-town clubwoman and as her- 
self — all in one flash of the camera 
(or so it seems). 



(olTiejWuor 



:Gord< 




Page 14 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1931 



Frankie Pinero, NBC violinist, featured with 
Breen and de Rose on Radio Luminaries, was 
a star sprinter in his school days. 



She — Have you ever had a lesson by corre- 
spondence? 

He — You bet! I never write to women now. 



The tubes in the new WEAF transmitter at 
Bellmore, Long Island, cost approximately 
$1,700 each. Each tube is half encased in 
copper. 



There are more than one million pieces of 
music, many of them special arrangements for 
various instrumental and vocal combinations, in 
NBC's musical library in New York. 



Gertrude Berg, author and leading woman 
in NBC's "Rise of the Goldbergs," is one of 
the few nationally celebrated radio stars who 
are natives of New York City. 



Homer Smith, top tenor of the Southern- 
aires, NBC's negro quartet, featured in South- 
land Sketches, is a nephew of W. C. Handy, 
father of "St. Louis Blues" and other famous 
blues songs. 



The judge had pronounced sentence of exe- 
cution. "You may be granted any one wish 
before you die," he said. 

"All right; Oi want to larn Chinese," re- 
plied the Irish prisoner. 




Harry C. Browne, originator and producer 
of Hank Simmons' Showboat series, admitted to 
your columnist yesterday that the nearest he'd 
been to a real honest-to-goodness Mississippi 
showboat was half a mile. That was fifteen 
years ago, and he had to climb a tree on a 
hill to see it. 

But then, Dante wrote "The Inferno" with- 
out having seen it. 



The Boswell sisters, purveyors of hot, vocal 
harmonies, who recently came to New York 
from the NBC San Francisco studios to give 
Eastern listeners a taste of their Deep South 
singing, started out in life as a classical string 
trio. • 



"And what would I have to give you for 
just one little kiss?" 
"Chloroform." 



Father (to Ikey) — Vat is another word for 
snake, wid five letters? 

Ikcy — A viper. 

Father — You silly! That's a handkerchief. 
— Thl-Bits. 

m 

Charles Tramont, NBC talkster, who has 
long been identified with Phil. Cook's pro- 
gram and other well known features, is the 
latest of the announcers to acquire an execu- 
tive's job. Tramont is now an official in 
NBC's program department. 



Miss Bertha Brainard, program manager for 
NBC, entered radio as an artist. She was 
WJZ's dramatic critic in 1922, and each week 
sent to listeners a summary of the current 
theater called "Broadcasting Broadway." 



Sponsors of the Mobiloil program, heard 
weekly through NBC channels, have ambi- 
tious plans for a summer series. The plans 
include weekly recitals by Gladys Rice, so- 
prano. 



Professor Boreleigh (apologetically) — If I 
have talked too long it's because I haven't my 
watch with me, and I saw no clock in this 
studio. 

From Control Room — There's a calendar 
behind you. 



PRESERVING THE SPECIES 

"I sincerely hope it will be a boy this time," 
said the pompous little man, "for it would 
be a thousand pities if the name of Smith 
were to become extinct." — Tit-Bits. 




Lady — Have you ever been offered work? 

Tramp — Only once, madam. Aside from 
that, I've met with nothing but kindness. — 
Christian Science Monitor. 



Although she had been traveling steadily for 
almost two months, Madame Ernestine Schu- 
mann-Heink, NBC operatic counsel, left New 
York for California immediately after the 
Roxy Tour had concluded late in March. 



The featured artists of the morning Camp- 
bell broadcasts through NBC networks in- 
clude Lew Conrad, novelty vocalist, and Andy 
Sannella. The program is noted among lis- 
teners as the "night-time feature of the day." 



Phil Cook's "Eddie" — Why is Mabel so an- 
gry? Phil gave a full account of her wed- 
ding. 

P. C.'s "Abner" — Yes, but he said that Miss 
Blackwell was married to the well-known col- 
lector of antiques. 



PAGE TELEVISION! 

"See that girl there — hie? Well, she's a 
liar. She told me she had two brothers and 
one sister — hie — and I just asked her brother, 
and he said — hie — he only had one brother and 
two sisters." 



Andy Sannella, orchestra leader and solo in- 
strumentalist, heard on many NBC programs, 
finds time to be a radio amateur after his 
musical day is done. Sannella owns a short- 
wave radio station, and is in almost nightly 
communication with many far-flung corners of 
the world. 

% 

Billy Jones and Ernie Hare, the NBC's In- 
terwoven Pair, estimate they have made al- 
most half a million phonograph records. 
Under one name or another the singing fun- 
sters claim to have "been on" every make 
of record ever pressed. 



'," 



Charles Francis Coe, writer and criminolo- 
gist, who inaugurated a series of gangster yarns 
over NBC networks a few weeks ago, is an 
Irish dialect comedian in private life. His 
Irish characterizations arc rated second to none 
on the speaking stage. 



;" 



Forty-three old family hymnals have been 
sent to Phillips H. Lord, NBC's "Seth Parker," 
since the first of the year. Most of the donors 
explain that the old books are treasured heir- 
looms, but Seth Parker's hymn sings so typify 
the memories evoked by the hymnals that he 
should have them for safekeeping. 



Peter Dixon, whose Raising Junior series 
for NBC will shortly be changed to one pro- 
gram a week, has signed a new contract with 
the Whcatena Company, sponsors of the pro- 
gram. The document calls for a series of 
weekly broadcasts during the summer, and for 
the daily sketches to be resumed in September. 



Charles Warburton, English actor, who 
played the role of the famous revolutionary 
traitor in NBC's recent "Trial of Benedict 
Arnold," was a leftenant in the British artil- 
lery during the war. He served four years on 
the Western Front. 



OR A BROADCASTING STUDIO 

'The snake to which I refer," said the 
schoolteacher, "is said to move with mathe- 
matical precision." 

"Do you mean an adder, sir?" suggested a 
bright pupil. 



Vaughn de Leath, NBC's "original radio girl," 
denies that the style of singing she created 
is crooning. Miss de Leath prefers to be called 
a "qualtoniste" rather than a "crooner." But 
"crooner" or otherwise, Miss de Leath is dis- 
tinctly in a class by herself. 



More than twelve thousand letters were re- 
ceived within forty-eight hours after Ted 
Lewis had inaugurated his Club Valspar pro- 
gram series over an NBC network. The pro- 
grams, heard Saturday nights, mark the band 
leader's first sustained series over a network. 



THE "SWAN" SONG 

The Girl — So you've seen daddy, darling? 
Did he behave like a lamb? 

Suitor (grimly) — Absolutely! Every time 
I spoke he said "Bah!" 



Billy Jones and Ernie Hare are the only 
NBC entertainers who always carry their own 
stop watches. Their numbers and patter are 
timed with split-second precision in the sanc- 
tity of their office before they come to the 
studio for a rehearsal. But many listeners 
would rather they did not bother to stop the 
good work. 



One of Europe's most famous radio stars is 
being heard every Monday afternoon in recital 
over an NBC network. He is Franz Baumann, 
noted tenor of German Talking Pictures, and 
of the Reichs Rundfunk Gesellschaft, which 
is the National Broadcasting Company of Ger- 
many. Baumann sings from the NBC new 
York studios. 



Harvey Hays, NBC actor who plays "The 
Old Timer" in the Empire Builders sketches, 
has become a radio director. He directs and 
plays in the series of one-act plays which are 
broadcast from the NBC Chicago studios every 
Monday afternoon at 1:30 o'clock E. S. T. 




"Synchronized conversation" is what that 
fun-team, Bradford Browne and Al Llewelyn, 
are calling the "Premier Chefs" act in which 
they participate each Tuesday night before 
WABC-Columbia microphones. 

Their announcements, as joint masters of 
ceremony, arc offered in perfect synchronism. 
Each breath is measured and accurately timed; 
each word receives just so much intonation; 
pronunciation, of course, must be perfectly co- 
ordinated . . . oh, it's not so easy, that fifteen- 
minute period. 

You know — too many cooks spoil the broth 
— so Brad and Al try to sound like one. 



"Dearest Annabcllc," wrote Oswald, who 
was hopelessly in love. "I would swim the 
mighty ocean for one glance from your dear 
eyes. I would walk through a wall of flame 
for one touch of your little hands. I would 
leap the widest stream in the world for a word 
from your lovely lips. As always, your Os- 
wald. 

"P. S. — I'll be over Saturday night if it 
doesn't rain." 



Most radio actors read their lines from man- 
uscript, but not so with Ferdinand Gottschalk, 
famous star of Broadway productions. When 
Gottschalk appeared as one of the guest stars 
in a recent RCA- Victor play, he surprised the 
director and other members of the cast by 
virtually discarding his script in the actual 
broadcast. But he didn't miss a single line. 



TUNING IN 

A motorist had just crashed a telegraph pole. 
Wire, pole and everything came down around 
his ears. They found him unconscious in the 
wreckage, but, as they were untangling him, 
he reached out feebly, fingered the wires and 
murmured: 

"Thank heaven, I lived clean — they've given 
me a harp." 



The NBC occupies seven floors of a fifteen- 
story office building in New York, and a small 
portion of the office force has recently invaded 
an eighth floor. The broadcasters also have 
taken over the basement and roof of the build- 
ing. The company also maintains a huge 
"show" studio, with a seating capacity of six 
hundred, on the roof of the New Amsterdam 
Theater at Times Square. 




Mrs. Gabble — Did Mrs. Jones ever say any- 
thing to you about me, dear? 

Mrs. Jabber — Not one word, Jane. If Hes- 
ter Jones can't say something good of a per- 
son, she doesn't say anything. — Selected. 



Vincent Lopez was one of the first orchestra 
leaders ever to go on the air. According to 
the old master program book for WJZ, Lopez 
brought his orchestra to the tiny cloak-room 
studio which housed the station in Newark 
for a Sunday afternoon concert, on Feb. 26, 
1922. Lopez was "spotted"' on the schedule 
between a time announcement and a recital of 
children's songs by a twelve-year-old miss 
from Montclair, N. J. His programs from the 
St. Regis are still among NBC's most popular 
dance features. 



Ever hear of a radio celebrity who was 
known to his listeners only as "AJN"? It's 
no other than Milton J. Cross, NBC's veteran 
announcer and diction award winner. Al- 
though he began broadcasting in 1922, until 
192 5 his full name had never been heard on 
the air except when he sang vocal solos. In 
the early days announcers identified them- 
selves with letters, and AJN was Cross' desig- 
nation. A stood for "announcer," the J was 
for his own middle initial, and N was for 
Newark, where WJZ was then located. 



A commentary on the evolution of radio 
studios was made by Mrs. Julian Heath, NBC's 
menu expert, when she recently dedicated 
the luxuriously furnished new speaker's studio 
at 711 Fifth Avenue. From the depths of a 
richly upholstered chair, she laughingly ex- 
plained: 

"This is an incredible contrast to the ex- 
perience I had when I first broadcast nearly 
seven years ago. I remember that I talked 
into the microphone from the summit of a 
high chair, which had evidently been intended 
for a long-legged 'cello player. And when I 
ended my thirty-minute talk, I was so stiff 
the announcer had to lift me to the floor." 

Mrs. Heath has been on the air regularly, 
five days a week, for six years and a half. 



WJZ and WBAL synchronize as follows: 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, after 4 
p. M.; Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 
until 4 p. M.; Sundays, after 7:30 p. M.. 

WEAF and WTIC synchronize as follows: 
Mondays, Wednesdays and Fridays, until 4 
p. M.J Tuesdays, Thursdays and Saturdays, 
after 4 P. M.; Sundays, until 7:30 p. M. 



May, IQ3I 



WHAT'S OX THE A I U 



Tage 15 




'y'rovertsen 




PETRIE, of the NBC New York studios, and PROVENSEN, of the Washington studios, are 
already well known to radio fans, but "HACK" WILSON is a newcomer to the announcer's 
group. For several years he has been an NBC engineer, but since his debut as announcer for the 
Boswell Sisters, he has taken the fans by storm with his impersonations of Rudy Vallee, Walter"! 
Damrosch, Phil. Cook and a host of other microphone celebrities. 




J/. Warden Wilson 




II D I.I WIS and his orchestra visit the Club Val- 
sp.ir each Saturday night over WEAP and forty-one 
other NBC stations from a different city each week 
end. fed and his jazz hand have vaudeville contracts 
which keep them on the road, but, nevertheless, they 
arc "on the air" each session of the new "Saturday 
Night Club of the Air." 



yhilOhman v 
\ Q/idoryJnk// 

PHIL OHMAN and VICTOR ARDEN 
(above, left and right), noted two-piano duo, 
who have been absent from the NBC Studios for 
several months, returned to the air as the feat- 
ured artists on the Cold Medal I Kprcss, a new 
weekly feature. The program is heard on Mon- 
days at 8:30 v M. (E. I). 'I'.). 



Page 16 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1931 








I wondered, when I 
purchased your de- 
lightful magazine for 
the first time the oth- 
er day, just what our 
grandmothers would 
say at its title, 
"What's on the 
Air.'" They would 
check and double 
and double check 
(with apologies to 
Amos 'n' Andy) and 
be just as bewildered 
as in the beginning! 
It's a title to ponder 
over! It gives — quite 
concisely — an idea of 
our tremendous prog- 
ress. 
Can we have some more data about Phil. 
Cook (including his charming countenance) 
in your magazine? Also about a newcomer, 
Miss Helen King, who speaks over station WNJ 
in Newark, on "Graphology, and Its Relations 
with Criminology!" She sounds English — the 
best woman's voice I've ever heard over a radio 
(with the exception of an actress, of course). 
But so little is said of her. 

Bella. 




What Our Grand- 
mothers Would Say 



"BEGAN TO SEEP THROUGH THIS 
HEAD" 

I was all wrong about the magazine! Hon- 
est, if you had drawn little pictures all the 
way through, you could not have made it 
more plain. After using the schedule for a 
few days it began to seep through this head 
of mine, and now I think it's great. The 
size is still a little awkward, but that's a 
small matter. 

This insignific (g) ant reader of What's 
on the Air is big enough to admit she's 
wrong, and so I apologize. Profusely! 

P. S. — I'll have to let that big word, the 
second word in the last paragraph, go as it 
is, because I looked all over the house for 
the dictionary and couldn't find it. Guess 
the kids carried it off. 

Cape Vincent, N. Y. L. I. 



I am going to give one parting shot. It is a 
pot-shot at the present methods of broadcast- 
ing in the United States. You brought up 
the fight going on in Australia in your March 
issue. All I say is that the independent, busi- 
ness-supported stations may win out against 
the Government stations, because they have 
money behind them and can supply better pro- 
grams. But they are going to make a terrible 
sacrifice to get the better programs, like we 
have in our own country. They, too, like 




Haunted in Their Sleep 

most American radio fans, will be haunted in 
their sleep by insistent radio advertisements, 
proclaiming the virtues of Burns' Bigger and 
Better Buns, or something like that. And 
the quality of the programs will eventually 
degenerate, as in our own country, when the 
advertisers begin to appeal to the masses in 
earnest. Popular stuff ("Popular Rot" is a 
better name) will teach them the penalty of 
taking radio and putting it into the hands 
of persons who use it only for their own ends. 
Chicago, III. B. L. 



"I AM NOT LYING" 

In this day and age distance (DX) is not 
so much to boast about, because almost any 
modern set will pull in coast-to-coast stations 
if correctly handled and not hampered by 
interference. But my hobby is separation 
without overlapping on the high kilocycle 
belts, and here is what I think must be a 
record for this kind of reception. I received 
the following stations, one right after an- 
other, within a space of about twenty minutes, 
with no overlapping or whistling: 

12 30 Kc. WNAC, Boston, Mass. 

1240 Kc. KTAT, Fort Worth, Tex. 

1250 Kc. WRHM, Minneapolis, Minn. 

1260 Kc. KOIL, Council Bluffs, la. 

1270 Kc. WASH, Grand Rapids, Mich. 

I was using the frame of an iron bridge 
lamp as an antenna at the time. My set is a 
six-tube battery model, manufactured by Da- 
vid Grimes, Inc., and no longer made. It is 
about six or seven years old. I am not lying. 
Won't you please publish in "Fan Fare" the 
above portion of my letter about separating, 
and, if you like my compliments on your 
great little magazine, please publish them too. 
Yours for WOTA (WOTA magazine!). 

Canton, O. H. S. 



"WASN'T IT NICE?" 

In reading the March issue of your very en- 
tertaining and helpful magazine, I read (in 
lower left-hand corner of "Fan Fare" page) 
of the "Rudy Vallee Club" at Wood Ridge, 
N. J., having some five hundred members. I 
■was surely surprised to learn (at least, this 
is my deduction) that they have an asylum 
at Wood Ridge, N. J., and the thought also 
came to me that wasn't it nice that they 
supply the inmates with radios? 

Omaha, Neb. F. R. C. 



I sure like your new dress on the March 
issue, but I fail to find that place to scratch 



**£ 



L*±-Jk 




/ Use the Bottom of the Radio 

matches on it. I use the bottom of the radio 
at present, and will continue until the Mrs. 
finds it out. 

Either buy me a pipe that won't go out or 
put the match scratcher on one sheet. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. Firpo. 



"FOR WHAT IT MAY BE WORTH" 

Perhaps you would be interested in the out- 
come of a radio argument which several fans 
participated in, in Chanute, a few days ago. 

You will be flattered to know that every one 
preferred the new issue to the old one, in 
view of the fact that the station listings were 
more complete, the programs compact and 
complete, and the magazine is not too large, 
as it will fit very nicely in any bookrack or 
armchair. The local program listings are a 
great feature and add to the money's worth. 

But don't think you arc perfect. Riqln 
along with these bouquets were several bricks. 
It was unanimous that the change from black 
and red to black in program channels was 
for the worse. The red National symbol as 
contrasted with the black Columbia symbol 
produces more contrast and makes any pro- 
gram easier to find. There is not enough 
contrast between your National numbers, Co- 



lumbia numbers and the channel lines. We 
feel the old system was too good to discard. 

This criticism is offered for what it may 
be worth, and, meanwhile, What's on the 
Air continues to be our favorite magazine 
— almost the radio Bible. Several Fans. 

Chanute, Kan. By M. J. H. 



"THIS MAY SOUND LIKE A TESTI- 
MONIAL" 

Hurrah for the Three Doctors! We are 
proud of them. May this independence con- 
tinue. They have given many thousands new 
interest and have cured many blues. "Doc- 
tor" is a better name for them than "Baker" 
anyway, for they are doctors, and I, for one, 
wish to go on record as being one of their 
many cured patients. This may sound like 
a testimonial, but I don't believe there is any 
tonic in bottles that can give me the help 
these "three fine fellows" have given. 

If this makes me nutty, as some of my 
friends seem to think, I hope I remain so. 

Moline, III. M. A. 



I do not think your March magazine is so 
hot. It's harder on the nerves and eyesight. 




Don't Think Your Magazine Is So Hot 

I found my way around better when the red 
ink was used for NBC. No offense, only my 
temper is very short, and after mastering 
other past months had to start all over again, 
but I do swear by your WOTA. 

Saginaw, Mich. E. P. 



"AVER PLAISIR!" 

They say Maurice Chevalier gets four thou- 
sand. They might consider charity. 

Schenectady, N. Y. A. L. 



I have been buying your magazine now for 
nearly a year, and in that time have watched 
my bookseller gradually increasing his number 
from a few odd copies to a pile worthy of 
the Saturday Evening Post. It is perfectly 
invaluable as a reference, and I should feel 
lost without it now; not only for the excel- 
lent program indexes, which I note you have 
greatly improved with the March issue, but 
for the most interesting illustrations and let- 
ter-press. 

I hope you may add CFCF to your 
list, for since they have joined the N. B. C. 
it would be a great convenience to have them 
there. 

You may be interested- — since I have lugged 
you into the controversy — in a letter I have 
written to the Musical Times, London, En- 
gland, in reply to a most vicious, unfair and 
untruthful attack on broadcasting conditions 
on this continent made by a correspondent 
from Niagara Falls, Can. So I am enclosing 
a copy: 

The Editor, The Musical Times, 
London, England: 
I read with some surprise a letter from Can- 
ada on page 1 "> S of your February issue with 
regard to broadcasting on this continent, and 
was glad to note that it was not written by 
.1 Canadian, but by a "music-starved exile" — 
o! the type, fortunately now rare, that can 
find nothing to satisfy him in the country 
ot his adoption. 



It is not denied by any one here that the 
B. B. C. programs, as a whole, are superior 
to those on this continent; but when the 
statement is made that "three hours a week 
I of good broadcasting] do not suffice," and 
that "the radio industry is losing no sleep 
over the indifference of a few fastidious peo- 
ple who want entertainment above the ar- 
tistic level of an Iowa hog-farming commu- 
nity," the attack is passing the bounds of de- 
cency and of truth. 

I am not an advertiser, and I hold no brief 
for the radio industry, but I can not allow 




Of the Type Fortunately Now Rare 

such statements, appearing as they do in a 
magazine of your high standing and world- 
wide circulation, to pass unchallenged. A 
listener in Hamilton with an average good 
receiving set should be able to get all the 
programs I mention. Take this Sunday: — from 
11:00 to 12:30, the service of Christ Church 
Cathedral, Montreal, with all the beautiful 
music incidental to a Church of England ser- 
vice. Or, should it be preferred, the Roxy 
Symphony Hour at the same time. At one 
o'clock one can hear the National Oratorio 
Society of New York sing, with splendid' so- 
loists and chorus, part of Bach's "The Passion 
— St Matthew." This takes two Sundays to 
complete. They have already given "Carac- 
tacus," "Dream of Gerontius" and many oth- 
ers. At 2:30 a short concert by famous ar- 
tists, rendering music by Bach, Beethoven, Mo- 
zart, Grieg, etc. At 3:00 a mixed sextette 
well comparable with the "English Singers," 
giving a program of madrigals by Morley, 
Willbye, Arne, Byrd, Weclkes, etc. Also from 
3:00 to 5:00 p. M., the New York Philhar- 
monic Symphony Society, with Toscanini con- 
ducting. At 5:00 o'clock the Toronto Sym- 
phony Orchestra, with famous guest artists, 
sponsored by the Canadian National Railways. 
From 6:00 to 7:30, excellent programs of 
Northern — /'. e., Norwegian, Swedish and Dan- 
ish — music. 7:30 to 9 p. M., Cathedral 
service. At 10:00 o'clock the Imperial Oil 
Hour of fine music — guest artists last week, 
the "London String Quartet" and Mde. Jeanne 
Dusseau. At 11:30 p. M., the Russian Cathe- 
dral Choir from New York — magnificent 
voices — singing the music of great Russian 
composers. After midnight one can have a de- 
lightful half-hour of "Quiet Harmonies," or 
organ music, or can pick up excellent pro- 
grams from the West, as the Eastern stations 
sign off. 

During the week one can hear daily: "On 
Wings of Song," a delightful instrumental 
trio, giving one hour; the "Black and Gold 
Room" orchestra — all good music; the "Slum- 
ber Hour," 11:00 to 12:00, each evening, a 
wonderful string ensemble under the baton of 
M. Ludwig Laurier, or daily programs from 
the great hotels, who all carry concert orches- 
tras in addition to those who play only for 
dancing. In addition, we hear during the week 
the Montreal Symphony Orchestra, sponsored 
by Canadian Pacific Railway Company; Roch- 
ester Civic Orchestra, U. S. Marine Band, Mor- 
mon Tabernacle Organ and Choir from Salt 
Lake City, Walter Damrosch and his famous 
orchestra, Columbia Concerts Bureau, Nation- 
al Broadcasting ditto, and occasionally the 
Philadelphia Symphony Orchestra, to say noth- 
ing of many fine local programs. 

You may, in this connection, find interest 
in a magazine called What's on the Air, of 
which I enclose a copy. 

Montreal. Can. F. H. J. R. 



May, 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 17 




(il.M AUSTIN, in addition t<> guest .mist work, has .1 
fifteen-minute program of l-i • •» own n«r \VJ/ .mil ,mmi.iio 
late Tuesday night. DUMKI and I AS I. "Sisters oi the Skil ett," 
arc heard every afternoon over NBC blue, III R.T LOWN .mil 
his Hotel Kilt more Orchestra (picture, courtesy of Music 

Corporation of America) are favorites with < US listeners. 
JOHNNY MARVIN, popular R.KO artist, frequently broadcasts 
over mm . IIIRBII KAY (Music Corporation of America 

picture) .inci orclicstr.i .ire r.ulio l.ivorites wherever they K"- At 

last report tliey were broadcasting from Dallas, Tex. HARRY 
KOGl'N leads ihc Chicago Serenade over NBC blue four af- 
ternoons a week. IRMA (.1 I ,\, also ol < hicago, is on the air 
at least a half-dozen times .1 <l.iy; every week-day at 2:15 she 
Kives an organ recital over WJZ and associates. MABEL GAR- 
RISON, American soprano of international fame, sine,s cadi 
Tuesday at 8:00 over WBAL, Baltimore. BARBARA GOULD'S 
beaut) ulks over CBS c.kIi Thursday morning have aroused 
much interest among women listeners. 




Page 18 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1931 



SUNDAY, MAY 3-10-17-24-31 



Eastern 
Daylight 



4 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



3 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
To Be Announced. 

NBC (Blue) 

L — National Vespers: Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdiek. 

CBS 

1 — Sermon by Rev. D. G. Barnhouse. 

2 — Sweetheart Hour: Adele Vasa, Barbara Maurel, Ben 
Alley, Evan Evans. 

— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ L-L-L-L 
K0M0 L-L-L-L 



OREGON 
KGW L-L-L-L 



UTAH 



N. DAKOTA 
WDAY L-L-L-L 




N.H J 
-WBZ LL LI 
masS-WNAC 1-12-2 
|con«)Ri"WEAN 1 122 

WDRC 1 122 
vy-" 

^WABC 1 1 2-2 
IWJZ LL L-L 



Sunday 
J^ay 3, 10, 17 2.4. 31 



WFLA L-L-L-L 
WJAX L-L-L-L 
WI00 L-L-L-L 



WASHINGTON 

K0MO A-A-AA 



OREGON 
KGW A-A-A-A 



COLORADO 
KOA A-A-A-A 



CALIFORNIA 
KECA A-A-A-A 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A-A-A-A 



N. OAKOTA 

WDAY A-A-A-A 



me; 

WCSH A-A-A-A 

N.H f 

_ 1WNAC 1-1-2-2 
p^ WTAG A-A-A-A 

cowiP^WEAN 0-0-2-2 
WJAR A-A-A-A 




6 Eastern 
Daylight 



5 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



4 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



WFLA A-A-A-A 
WJAX A-A-A-A 
WIOD A-A-A-A 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Catholic Hour: Sermon; vocal soloists. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Raising Junior: Domestic skit. 
M — Margaret Olsen: Soprano; string trio. 
N — Radio Luminaries: Breen and de Rose. 
P — Cook's Travelogue. 
R — Northern Lights: Astrid Fjelde; the Tollefson trio. 

CBS 
1 — Fox Fur Trappers: Orchestra with Earle Nelson. 

2 — Howard Dandies: Betty Smart, contralto; Ben Alley, 

tenor; orchestra. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



7 Eastern 
Daylight 



6 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



5 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Old Stager's Memories: Tom Neely's orchestra. 
C — RCA Victor Program: Vocal soloists; orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
To Be Announced. 

CBS 
1 — Our World's Business: Dr. Julius Klein. 
2— Rhythm Choristers. 
3 — Toscha Seidel and Concert Orchestra. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ o-o-C-C 
K0M0 o-o-C-C 



OREGON 
KGW o-o-C-C 



KOA 0-0-C C 
KLZ 0-2-3 3 



KDYL l-o-3-o 
KSL o-o-C-C 



KGO o-o-CC 
KFI o-o-C-C 
KFSD oo-C-C 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-o-C-C 



WCSH o-o-C-C 



S OAKOTA 

WNAX 0-2-3-3 



WABC 1-2-3-3 
WEAF A-A-C-C 
WFBL 1-2-3-3 




KFH 1-2-3-3 



WCAO 1-2-3-3 



FLA o-CC 
WIOD o-o-C-C 



SUNDAY LOCAL PROGRAMS 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 3 
hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

10:30 A. M. — Frank Gittlcson, concert violin- 
ist, WBAL. 

1:30 P. M. — Polish Music Hour, WLS. 

3:30 — Little Brown Church. 

4:00 — Prairie President (Lincoln Drama), 
WLS. 

4:15— High Spots in Canada, WGBS. 

5:00 — Alice Ryder and Silver String Ensem- 
ble, WGBS. 

5:00 — Vesper Church Services, KDKA. 

5:15 — Uncle Ed and His Family Circle, 
WCAO. 

5:30 — Red Lacquer and Jade (semi-classic), 
WOR. 

6:00— The Romany Trail, WBAL. 

6:00 — Organ Recital, WPG. 

6:45 — Choir Invisible (semi-classic), WOR. 

6:45 — Palace Credit Review, KDKA. 

7:30— Public School Musicalc, WTAR. 

7:30 — Mike and Herman (humor), WBBM. 

8:00 — Jarvis Street Baptist Church, Toronto, 
CKGW, 



8:00— Manor Opera Hour, WGN. 

8:30 — Sunday Evening Club (semi-religious), 
WMAQ. 

8:30 — Crosley Concert Hour, WLW. 

8:30 — Voices at Twilight (semi-classic), 
WLS. 

8:45 — The Bing Family (comedy), WGR. 

9:00— Children's Program, KTSA. 

9:00 — Chronicles, WTMJ. 

9:00 — Arlington Orchestra (popular) , KTHS. 

9:00 — Sports Review, KDKA. 

9:00 — Ludwig Baumann Hour (popular), 
WOR. 

9:30— Vesper Hour, WIOD. 

9:45— At the Baldwin, KWK. 
10:00 — Vocalists, WTAR. 
10:00 — Lone Star Rangers (male quartet), 

WOR. 
10:30— The Playhouse, WOR. 
10:30 — Musical Roundup (variety), WCFL. 
10:30— Kolb Baker Boys, WCAO. 
11:00 — Universal Artists' Bureau, WCAU. 
11:15— New Flashes, KYW. 
11:30 — Grucn Guildsmcn (semi-classic), 

WKRC. 
1 1 :30— Moonbeams (semi-classic), WOR. 
11:30— Army Band, KTSA. 



11:30 
11:45 
11:45 
12:00 
12:00 
12:00 
12:00 
12:00- 
12:00- 
12 to 



—Bill Hay in Bible Readings, WMAQ. 
to 1:30 A. M. — Dance Orchestras, KYW. 
—Ted Weems' Orchestra, WGN. 
— Radio Reporter, WJR. 
— Dance Music, WGY. 
— Symphony Orchestra, WSM. 
— Religious Hour, KTSA. 
-Coon Sanders' Orchestra, WGN. 
-Solitaire Cowboys (drama), KOA. 
1:00 a. M. — Quiet Harmonies. Noc- 
turne (Ann Leaf at the organ), 
WABC, WCAU, WEAN, WTAR, 
WNAC, KFH. 
a. m.— RKO-Albee Act, WLW. 
—The Homing Hour, WHAS. 
—Nutty Club, WBBM. 
—Crosley Revue, WLW. 
— Music about Town, KMBC. 
—Midnight Melodies, WTAM. 
—Light Opera, KMOX. 
— Kaffee Hag Slumber Music, KOA. 
—Dance Music, KFWB. 
—Organ Recital, WSMB. 



Readers are invited to send us names and 
schedules of favorite local programs for list- 
ing in this column. 



12 


30 


12 


50 


1 


00 


1 


00 


1 


00 


I 


00 


1 


30 


1 


30 


2 


00 


2 


00 



DAYTIME CHAIN FEATURES 
NBC— BLUE 
12:45 p. m. — Echoes of the Orient. 
1:30 — Little Jack Little. 
2:00 — Deems Taylor Musical Series. 
2:30 — Yeast Foamers. 
3:00 — Dan Poling. 
4:15 — Firestone (beginning May 31). 

NBC— RED 
12:45 p. M. — Echoes of the Orient. 
1:00 — National Oratorio Society. 
2:00 — Deems Taylor Musical Scries. 
2:30 — Artists Bureau. 
3:55 — Moonshine and Honeysuckle. 
3:30 — Swift Garden Program. 
4:00 — Dr. S. Parkes Cadman. 

CBS 

8:00 A. M. — Heroes of the Church. 
10:00 — Tony's Scrapbook. 
10:15 — Children's Playlet. 
12:00 — Jewish Art Program. 
12:30 p. M. — International Broadcast. 

1:30 — Around the Samovar. 

3:00 — Symphonic Hour. 

4:00 — Cathedral Hour. 



Ma j', 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Pas 



e 19 



WASHINGTON N DAKOTA 

KHQ L-M-M-M 
KOMO L-M-M-M, 
KOL l-o-o-4 
KFPY l-o-o-o 
KVI l-o-o-o 




ME.) 

WCSH AAA A 

NH WBZ L-M-M-M 
|WNAC 1-2-3-4 
WORC 0-2-3-4 
WTAG AAA A 

WEAN 1-0-3-4 
WJAR A-A-A-A 
WTIC A-A-A-A 
WDRC 1-2-0-4 
WABC 1-2 3-4 
WEAF A-A-A-A 
WJZ L-M-M-M 
WGY A-A-A-A 
WFBL 1-2 3-4 

WMAL 1-2-3-4 

WRC A-A-A-A 
WBAL o-M-M-M 
WCAO 1-2-3-4 



uurvday 
T%.y 5, 10, 17; 24, 31 



SUNDAY, MAY 3-10-17-24-31 

East. Standar 
Cent. Dayligh 



8 Eastern ^ East. Standard s Cent. Standard 

Daylight / Cent. Daylight O Mt. Daylight 



ARIZONA 
KTAR L-o-o-o 



WFLA L-A-A-A 
WIOD L AAA 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 
NBC (Red) 
A — Chase and Sanborn: Maurice Chevalier; orchestra. 
NBC (Blue) 

L — Enna Jettick Melodies: Mixed quartet; string en- 
semble. 
M — Collier's Radio Hour. 
CBS 

1 — Devils, Drugs and Doctors: Howard W. Haggard, 

M.D. 
2 — Piano Pals: Dolph Opfinger and Charles Touchette. 
3 — Kaltenborn Edits the News. 

4r— The Gauchos: Argentine music; Vincent Sorey con- 
ducting. 
0— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



9 Eastern Q East, btanda 

Daylight O Cent, Daylig 



East, Standard 
ht 



7 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — "Our Government": David Lawrence. 
B — Atwater Kent Hour: Soloists; orchestra. 
C — Iodent Big Brothers Club. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Collier's Radio Hour. 
M — Bayuk Cigar Company Program. 
N — Westinghouse Salute. 

CBS 
1 — The Coty Playgirl: Irene Bordoni. 
2 — Graham-Paige Hour: Detroit Symphony Orchestra; 

Edgar A. Guest. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ LB Bo 
KOMO LB Bo 
KOL oo-2-2 
KFPY oo-2-2 




e; 

WCSH A-o-o-C 
WBZ L-o N 
WEEI o-B-B C 
WNAC 1 1 2 2 
WTAG A-o-o-C 
WE~AN 112 2 
'WJAR A-o-o-C 
WTIC o-o-o-C 
WDRC 1 122 

WABC 1 1-2-2 

WEAF A B B C 

WJZ L M M-N 

WHEC o-o 2 2 

WGY A B B C 

WFBL 1122 



WMAL 112 2 
WRC A B B C 

W8AL L-M M N 
WCAO 1122 



KPO LB Bo 
KFRC 0-0-2 2 
KFI LB Bo 
KHJ 0-0 2-2 



WFLA A N 
WIOD A-o-o-N 
[ WQAM 2 2 
WDBO 00 2 2 
WDAE oo22 



WASHINGTOM 




NEW |VERMONT\ 

IWC^SH A BBC 

WBZ L-o-N-N 

N- M WEEI o-B-B-C 

WNAC l-l-2-o 

mass WJAG A-B-B-o 

conn) 

WEAN 1-1-2-0 
WJAR A BBC 
WTIC A-B-B-o 
WDRC oo-2-n 
WFBL 1-1-2-0 
N ' 7 WABC 11-2-3 
WEAF A-B-B-C 
WJZ L-o-N-N 
WMAL 1-1-2-0 
WRC A-B-B-C 



10 



Eastern 
Daylight 



9 5 



East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



8 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



KGO C 
KFRC 1 1 o-o 
KECA 000 C 
KHJ 1 1 00 
KFSD 000C 

ARIZONA 

KTAR o 00 C 



WFLA L B B C 
WJAX B B C 
WIOD L B-B C 



11 Eastern 
1 Daylight 



1 a Bast. Standard Q Cent. Standard 
1 U Cent. Daylight / Ml. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Sunday at Seth Parker's. 
B — Muriel and Vee. 
C — Russian Cathedral Choir. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Wenrich and Connelly. 

M — Heel Hugger Harmonies: Male quartet; orchestra. 
N — South Sea Islanders: Native music and dialog. 

CBS 
1 — Back Home Hour from Buffalo: Religious service. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Iodent Program. 

B — National Dairy Productions: Famous trials in his- 
tory. 

C — Sunday at Seth Parker's. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Westinghouse Salute. 
N — Kellogg Slumber Music: String ensemble. 

CBS 
1 — Royal's Poet of the Organ: Jesse Crawford. 
2 — Fortune Builders: Douglas Gilbert interviews. 
3 — Round Towners. 
— Local Programs. 

State, and wavelength guides on page 33 



WCSH A 000 

NH WBZ M 
■WEEI A 000 
WNAC I 11 I 
.\J1 
CON»/"',WEAN 1111 
J-^WJAR A 000 
IWORC 1111 
,WABC 1111 
WEAF A B CC 
WJZ L M N N 

n j r 




rvHwMAL 1111 
A J WRC A BCC 

WBAL L M N N 

WCAOJ 1 1 I 



KGO A 
KPO M 
KECA A W 
KFSD A M 00 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A M 



WFLA A E"0 
WJAX A 
,WIOO A 000 



Page 20 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1931 



MONDAY, MAY 4-11-18-25 



WASHINGTON 



Eastern 
Daylight 



4 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



3 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Tea Timers: Dance band with Baby Rose Marie. 
B — The Lady Next Door: Children's program. 
C — Rex Cole Mountaineers. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Chats with Peggy Winthrop. 
M — "The Book Reporter": Cliff Fadiman. 
N — Little Orphan Annie. 
P — Market and Business Reports. 

CBS 
1 — Art Gillham. 

2 — Gypsy Music-makers: Emery Deutsch, conductor. 
3 — La Gerardine Program: Jean Beaudine. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 




WBZ L-o-N-o 
iWNAC o-oo-3 
\WTAG A-A-A-o 

\o 

■WEAN oo-o-3 
WJAR A-A-A-o 
WDRC 12-2-3 

WABC 12-2-3 
WEAF A-A-A-C 
K& f WJZ LM-N-P 
WPG 1-1-1-1 

WMAL 12-2-0 
WRC A A B 8 
fWBAL L-M-N-o 

WCAO 1-2-2-3 



riorxday 
I^ay 4, 1 1, 18, £5 



WASHINGTON 
KOL 11-0-0 



OREGON 
KGW o-M-M-o 



COLORADO 
KOA o-M-M-o 
KLZ l-1-o-o 

UTAH 
KSL oM Mo 



CALIFORNIA 
KGO o-M-M-o 
KPO o-M-M-o 
KFRC I-I-0-0 
KFSD o-M-M-o 



qUEBEC / NEW 

f^YORK 
CKGW o-M-M-o yVBEN o-o-o-C 

WK8W 0-0-2-3 
WHAM o-M-M-N 
WHEC o-o-2-o 





ME./ 

,WBZ o-o-o-N 
WNAC o-o-2-3 
N-H WORC 0-0-2-0 

, J WTAG o-o-o-C 

J"MASS. \ 

[c^Wwean 00-2-0 



-WDRC 1-1-2-0 

-ABC 1-1-2-3 
WEAF A-A-B-C 
|WJZ L-M-M-N 
,WGY o-o-o-C 
WFBL 1-1-0-0 
WOKO o-o-2-o 



6 Eastern 
Daylight 



5 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



4 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



KFH 1-1-0-0 



OKLAHOMA 

texas\, 



WFLA o-o-o-N 

G EORGIA i—jWJAX o-o-o-N 

/WIOD o-o-o-N 



FLORIDA 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Black and Gold Room Orchestra. 
B — "Who's Behind the Name": Edwin Alger. 
C — Black and Gold Room Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Ford and Wallace: Vocal and instrumental duo. 
M — Mormon Tabernacle Choir and Organ. 
N — Lowell Thomas. 

CBS 
1 — Fulton Royal Orchestra. 
2 — Tidewater Inn: Boy Atwell, comedian. 
3 — Eno Crime Club: Mystery serial. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



7 Eastern 
Daylight 



6 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



5 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Dance Music. 

B — The World To-day: James G. McDonald. 
C — Snoop and Peep: Comedy skit. 
D — Careless Love: Negro sketch. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Amos 'n' Andy: Blace-faee comedians. 
M — Tastyeast Jesters. 
N — Phil Cook: Dialectician. 
P — Roxy Theatre: Orchestra direction, Erno Rapee. 

CBS 
1 — Current Events: H. V. Kaltenborn. 
2 — Winegar's Barn Orchestra. 
3 — Evangeline Adams: Astrologer. 
4 — To Be Announced. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ o-o-N-o 
KOMO 0-B-N-0 
KOL l-2-o-o 



ONTARIO QUEBEC / NEW 

CKGW L-ooPCFCF L o N R/^vork 

-WGR 1 2 3o , 
WHAM L-M-N-P 
WHEC 0-03-0 
WGY o-o-C-D 




ME/ 

WCSH 00 C 

' n h{^BZ LM No 

WEEI o-o-C-D 

WNAC 0-0 3 

WORC l-2-o-o 

conk/ ki ,WTAG CD 

WEAN o-o-3-o 

WDRC 0-2-3-0 

WABC 123 4 
WEAF A BCD 
WJZ L-M-N-P 
WFBL 123o 




(WMAL I-00-0 
WRC L-M-N-o 

WBAL L-M-N-P 
WCAO 1-2-3-4 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO 0-B-N-0 
KFRC 1-2-00 
KECA o-B-o-o 
KFI o-o-N-o 
KFSD 0B-N-0 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-o-N-o 



WFLA Lo No 

JNJAX Lo N 

/JWIOD L-M N 

/WDBO o-2-o-o 



MONDAY LOCAL PROGRAMS 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

5:30 p. M. — Italian Lesson, WMAQ. 

6:00— Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 

6:00— Air Juniors, WENR. 

6:00 — Jules and Mrs. Everybody, WCAU. 

6:00 — Jersey Cereal (dance), KDKA. 

6:15 — Little German Band (humor), KDKA. 

7:00 — Mike and Herman (humor), WBBM. 

7:00 — Orange Grove String Band, WRUF. 

7:05 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 

7:45— Harold Teen (comic), WGN. 

7:45 — Mr. and Mrs. Cain (comedy), WBZ. 

8:00 — Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 

8:00— Lc Bocuf Sketchbook, WBZ. 

8:00 — Fleetwing Band (popular), KDKA. 

8:00— Adam and Eve (comedy), WBEN. 

8:15— Uncle Walt and Skcezix, WGN. 

8:30— Gloomchasers (humor), WKBW. 

8:45— Bob Newhall Sports, WLW. 

8:45- — George and Blossom (humor), CFRB. 

9:00 — Lenox Sporting Club (boxing), WHN. 

9:00 — Dramas of Old St. Louis, KWK. 

9:00— Jimmy Wilson Catfish Band, KVOO. 



9:00— Charlie Hamp (piano), WBBM. 

9:00— Old Fiddlers, KTHS. 
10:00— Jug Band, WHAS. 
10:00— Cathedral Quartet, WGY. 
10:00— A Bit o' Opera, WSMB. 
10:15— "Old Virginia" (historical), WRVA. 
10:30— Classical Hour, WTAR. 
10:30— Musical Roundup (variety), WCFL. 
11:00— Star Dust, WBAP. 
1 1 :00 — Ben Jones and Musical Aces, WTAR. 
1 1 :00 — Imperial Tobacco Joycasters, CKGW. 
1 1 :00 — Musical Movies, WSM. 
11:01— Sports, KDKA. 
11:10 — Louie's Hungry Five, WGN. 
11:15 — Supreme Serenaders, KOA. 
11:30— Dan and Sylvia, WMAQ. 
11:30— Ford Minstrel Show, WDAF. 
11:30 — Moonbeams, WOR. 
11:30 — Organ Recital, CFRB. 
11:30 — Mahi Temple Shrine Band, WIOD. 
11:45— DX Club, WMAQ. 
12:00 — Witching Hour, WKRC. 
12:00 — Phil. Spitalny and His Orchestra, 

WRC, KYW, WEAF, WTMJ. 
12:00 — Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, 
KTAR, KGO, KFI, KFSD, KOA, 
KGW, KSL, KHQ, KOMO. 



12:00- 

12:00- 

12:00- 
12:00- 
12:00- 
12:15 

12:15- 
12:30- 

12:30- 
12:30- 



12:30- 
12:30- 

12:30- 



1:00- 
1:45- 
2:00- 
2:00- 



-Asbury Park Casino Orchestra, KFH, 

WABC, KTSA, WTAR. 
-Cab Calloway and His Orchestra, 

WENR, WREN, WJZ, WGAR. 
-Dance Music, WGN. 
-Willys Musical Memories, WLW. 
-Dance Music, KYW. 
A. M. — Bernie, Whiteman, Gcndron, 

WBBM. 
-Village Rhymester, KWK. 
-Joe Morgan and His Orchestra, 

WREN, WJR, KWK, WJZ. WGAR. 
-Nocturne (Ann Leaf, organist; Ben 

Alley, tenor), KFH, WABC, KTSA, 

WTAR. 
-Louis Panico's Orchestra (from Chi- 
cago), WRC, WSB, WENR, KSD, 

WEAF, WTAM, WSM. 
-Theatrical Hour, WSPD. 
-Hotel Orchestras, KWK. 
-The Nightcappcrs (vaudeville), KOA. 

Second Monday, Koa Koons Minstrel 

Shows, KOA. 
-Midnight Melodies, WTAM. 
-Nighthawk Frolic, WDAF. 
-Midnight Merry-makers, KWK. 
-Frolic of the Dodos, KTSP. 



OH 



CBS 
A. M.- — Morning Devotions. 



8:30 — Tony's Scrapbook. 

8:45 — Old Dutch Girl. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
10-12 — Radio Homcmakers. 
11:30 — Uneeda Bakers. 
Noon to 2:30- — Music. 

2:30 — American School of the Air. 

3:00 to 5:00 — Music. 

NBC— BLUE 

7:45 in East and S:45 in West, Jolly Bill 

and Jane. 
10:45 — Winifred Carter. 
12:30 — Farm and Home. 

2:15 — Irma Glen at Organ. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 

NBC— RED 

8:00 in East and 9:00 in Wcs* Gene and 
Glenn. 

S:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell's Orchestra. 

9:45— A. & P. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

4:00 I>. M. — U. S. Marine Band. 






May, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Pat 



OREGON 
KGW A 0-0-0 
KOIN 00-44 



UTAH 
KDYL 00-4-4 
KSL A-o-M-M 

NEVADA 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A-o-4-4 



N- DAKOTA 

KFYR A 00 



WCCO 2 3-4 4 
KSTP o-B-o-o 



WEBC A-o-o 
WISN o-3-o-o 



QUEBEC / NE 

y-^YORI 

.WBEN o-B-C C 



KFAB L-L-M-M 
WOW o-o-C-C 



IOWA 

KOIL 2-3-4-4 
KSCJ 0-0-4-4 
WHO o-B-C-C 
WMT 0-0-4-4 



IWBCM o-o-4-4 

)WXYZ 2-3-4-4 

'WJR o-o-M-M 

WWJ A-B-C-C 



ONTARIO 
CKGW L-B-o-o 
fJFRB 00-4-4 

CFCF L-BoT WGR 2-0-4-4 



ILLINOIS 



KYW o-B-o-o 
WGN o-o-C-C 
WIBO L-L-o-o 
WMAQ 2-3-0-0 
l WJJO 0-0-4-4 



WOWO 00-4-4 
WGL 2-0-0-0 

WFBM 0-3-4-4 



WREN o-o-M-M 
WIBW o-o-4-4 
KFH 0-0-4-4 



KMBC 2 3-4-4 

I WDAF A-B-C-C 

\KMOX 2-3o-o 

KSD A-B-C-C 

KWK L-L-M-M 



OHl~ 
WSPD 2-3-4 4 
WTAM o-B-C C 
WGAR L-L-M-M 
WHK 2-3-4-4 
WADC 2-3-4-4 
I WAIU 0-0-4-4 
WLW o-o-M-M 
1 WSAI A-B-C-C^ 
I WKRC o y -3'4-4 



CKAC o-o-4-4 WKBW o-3-o-o 
WHAM L-L-o-o 

..NNSYLVANIA 
KDKA o-o-M-M 
WCAE o-B-C-C 
WJAS 0-3-4-4 
WLBW 0-0-4-4 
WHP l-o-o-o 
WCAU 1-3-4-4 
WLIT A-B- C-C 

MARYLAND 



KFJF 2-0-4-4 ARKANSAS 
, WKY o-B-M-M 



\KVOO A 0-0-0 



IKTHS o-B-o-o 



WHAS o-B-o-o 

^S^WennIsSeT 

WMC A-B-o-o 
WREC 2-0-0-0 
WSM o-B-o-o 



MWTAR 1-o-4-4 x 
WRVA o-B-M-M 
WDBJ 1-0-4 4 

CAROLINA 

WBT 1-0-4-4 
WPTF o-B-M-M 
WWNC 1-0-4-4 



VERMONT j I£WCSH A-B-C-C 
\WIBZ o-o-M-M 
MH WEEI o-B-C-C 
NH WNAC 1-3-4-4 

i5„Cr W0RC 10+-4 
"i^WTAG o-o-C-C 

[ci«) RI WEAN 1-3-4-4 
'WJAR A-B-C-C 
WTIC o-B-C-C 
:WDRC 1-3-4-4 
IWABC 1-3-4-4 
•WEAF A-B-C-C 
WJZ L-L-M-M 
WGY o-o-C-C 
WFBL 2-3-4-4 
WPG 1-3-4-4 
WMAL 1-3-4-4 
'WRC A-B-C-C 
WBAL L-L-M-M 
-WCAO 13-4-4 



MONDAY, MAY 4-11-18-25 



8 Eastern 
Daylight 



7 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



6 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



V.S- CAROLINA 



Hay 4, II, 18, £5 



WFAA o-B-o-o 
WRR 2-0-4-4 
KPRC o-B-o-o 
KTRH 00-4-4 
WOAI o-B-M-M 



LOUISIANA 

WDSU 2-0-4-4 
WSMB o-B-o-o 



[MisSissiPPi 
IJDX A B o -< 



IWBRC oo-4- 
ALABAM^ 



WSB o-B-o-o 
WTOC l-o-o-o 
WGST 2-0-4-4 

GC052i£_ 
FLORIOA 



WFLA A-B-M-M 
"WJAX o-B-M-M 
WIOO o-B-MM 
WQAM l-o-o-o 
-]WDBO l-o-o-o 
/WDAE l-o-o-o 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — How's Business: Merle Thorpe. 
B — Pennzoil Pete: Accordian soloist; Andy Sannela 

orchestra. 
C — A. & P. Gypsies: Male quartet; orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Roxy Theatre. 
M — Gold Medal Express: Piano duo; novelty orchestra. 

CBS 
1 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 
2 — Lowell Thomas. 
3 — Barbosol Program. 

4 — The Simmon's Hour: Grand opera stars. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



9 Eastern 
Daylight 



8 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



7 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — A. & P. Gypsies. 

B — General Motors Program: Male quartet and or- 
chestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Maytag Orchestra. 
M — Chesebrough Real Folks: Sketch of small-town life. 

CBS 
1 — The Three Bakers. 
2 — Bourjois: An evening in Paris. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ L-L B-B 
KOMO L L-B-B 
KOL 1-1-2-2 
KFPY 1122 

OREGON 
KGW L-L-B-B 
KOIN 1-1-2-2 



COLORADO 

KOA L L-B-B 
KLZ 1-1-2-2 

UTAH 
KDYL 1-1-2-2 
KSL L L B-B 

NEVADA 



CALIFORNIA 
KGO L-L-B-B 
KFRC 1-12-2 
KECA L-L-o-o 
KFI o o-B-B 
KHJ 11-2-2 




MWLBZ 1-1-0-0 
v w — 



(VERMONT \ 

^WCSH A-A-B-'b 

, UH WBZ L-L-M-M 

HH - WEEI A A B-B 

-TT-WNAC 1-1-2-2 

TMASS^ W0RC Mqo 

[J^YriWTAG A-A B-B 

'WEAN 1-1-2-2 
WJAR A A B-B 
•>WTIC A ABB 
[ WDRC l-1-o-o 

rWABC 1-1-22 

fWEAF A A-B B 

i WJZ L L-M M 

WFRL 1-122 

iWPG l-1-o-o 



WMAL 1122 
WRC A ABB 

WBAL L-L-M-M 
WCAO 11-2-2 



KRLD 1-1-2-2 
WFAA L-L-B-B 
KPRC L-L-B-B 
KTRH l-l-o-o 
KTSA l-1-o-o 
WOAI L-L-B-B 



WQAM 11-0-0 

WDBO 1-1-0-0 

/WDAE l-1-o-o 



WA5HINGT0N 
KHQ L-L-M-M 
XOMO L-L-M-M 
KOL 11-0-0 
KFPY Moo 



ONTARIO QUEBEC / NEW 

CKGW L-L-M-M CFCF L-L-^-B "° R « 
WBEN A-A o-o 
WKBW l-l-o-o 
WHAM L-L-M-M 
WGY o-o BB 




VERMONT \ | ME; 

WBZ LLM M 
WEEI A-A-B 8 
WNAC llo-o 
-WORC o-o-2-2 
ass. (WTAG A ABB 
NM /mWEAN 1-1-2-2 
WJAR A ABB 
WDRC 1-1-22 
>WABC 11-22 
WEAF A ABB 
,WJZ L-L-M-M 
WFBL llo-o 



WMAL 1-1-2-2 
WRC A-A SB 

"WBAL 1 L-L-M-M 

WCAO 1-1-2-2 





CALIFORNIA 
KGO oo M M 
KFRC 1loo 
KECA o-o-M M 
KFI LLoo 
KHJ 1 1 oo 
KFSD L-L-M-M 

ARIZONA 
KTAR L-L-M-M 



WFLA LLoo 
WJAX LLoo 
WIOO LLoo 



-I f\ Eastern r\ East. Standard Q Cent. Standard 

1 U Daylight 7 Cent. Daylight O Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Adventures of Sherlock Holmes: Dramatic sketch. 
B — Symphonic Rhythm-makers: Vaughn de Leath; or- 
chestra. 

NBC (Blue) 

L — Stromberg-Carlson Program: Rochester Civic Or- 
chestra. 
M — Empire Builders: Drama. 

CBS 
1 — Robert Burns Program: Guy Lombardo's orchestra. 
2 — Savino Tone Pictures. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



11 Eastern i (\ East. Standard r\ Cent. Standard 
1 Daylight 1 U Cent. Daylight 7 Mt. Daylight, 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Dance Music. 
B — Dance Music: Basse and his orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Slumber Music. 
M — Amos 'n' Andy. 
N — Jean Cowan: Crooner. 
P— George Ku Trio: Hawaiian music. 

CBS 

1— Morton Downey: Willi orchestra. 

2 — Morton Downey. 

3 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 

4 — Ben Bcrnie and Orchestra. 

o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ M ooo 
KOMO M ooo 
KOL o 3 4 4 
KFPY o3-o-o 



N« [WNAC o 2 n-o 

^WORC 1 24 4 

■Ra;>s 

0Nk/ RyWEANo2oo 

,WDRC 124 4 

WABC 124 4 
WEAF A A B 8 
WJZ L L N P 
N j; 

WPG 1 o o o 




'WMAL oo44 
$WRC L L N P 



WIOO A A o o 



Tage 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1931 



TUESDAY, MAY 5 

5 Eastern a 

Daylight T 



12 - 19 - 26 



East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs hy 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Pond's: Orchestra; guest speaker. 
B — Rinso Talkie. 
C — Rex Cole Mountaineers. 
D — Tea Timers. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — "Voices": Louise B. Laidlaw. 
M — Gems of Melody. 

N — Little Orphan Annie: Dramatic skit. 
P — Market and Business Reports. 

CBS 
1 — Rhythm Kings: Nat Brusiloff's orchestra. 
2 — Adventures in Words: Dr. Frank H. Vizetelly, 
3— Mr. and Mrs. F. C. H.: Script act. 
4 — Biltmore Orchestra. 
5 — Tony's Scrap-book. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



COLORADO 
KOA o-o-o-D 
KLZ 1-245 

UTAH 




ME J 

WCSH A-A-0-0 
/ 
n.h. WBZ 0-0-N-o 

WEEI A-A-B-o 

masI WTAG A-A-B-o 

« ^ 
CON »ri/WJAR A-A-B-o 

-WTIC A-A-B-o 
S WDRC 1-2-4-5 

1WABC 1-2-3-5 
S tWEAF A-A-B-C 
^ J /WJZ L-M-N-P 
1WPG o-o-4-o 



,WMAL 1-2-0-0 
>VRC A-A-B-O 

WBAL o-o-N-o 
WCAO 1-2 4-5 



KRLD 124 5 



Tue sdcxy 
li.ex.y5, 12, 19, £6 



WDAE Vo-0-0 



WASHINGTON 

KOMO o-o-B-o 
KOL 1-1-1-0 



WCSH A A -o-o 

* H WBZ o-o-N-P 

WNAC o-o-o-3 

mass. W TAG 0-0-0-A 



.WTIC A ABA 
WDRC 1-1-1-0 

WABC 1-1 23 
WEAF A ABA 
WJZ L-M-N P 




6 Eastern 
Daylight 



5 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



4 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



WMAL 1 l-1-o 
WRC o-o-B-A 

WBAVo-oo-P 

WCAO 1-1-1 



WFLA 0-0-0 P 
EOR£^__. j-WJAX 0-0-0 P 

-rrr: v wiod 0-0-0-p 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Black and Gold Room. 
B — Who's Behind the Name: Edwin A. Alger. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Raising Junior: Domestic skit. 
M — Walter Mills: Baritone. 
N — Savannah Liners' Orchestra. 
P — Lowell Thomas. 

CBS 
1 — Harry Tucker's Orchestra. 
2 — Postal Telegraph Presents. 
3 — Eno Crime Club: Mystery serial. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



7 Eastern 
Daylight 



6 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Talks by Prominent People. 
B — Soconyland Sketches: Historical drama. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Amos 'n' Andy. 
M — Miniature Movies: Gus Van. 
N— Phil Cook. 
P — Scholl Program: Comedy duo. 

CBS 
1 — Frederic William Wile. 
2 — American Mutual Program: The house beside the 

road. 
3 — Chiclets Program. 
4 — Winegar's Barn Orchestra. 
5 — Daddy and Rollo. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



KHQ o-o-N P 
KOMO A-A-N-P 
KOL l-o-o-o 



COLORADO 

KOA A-A-N-P 
KLZ 00-4-0 

UTAH 
KSL o-o-N-P 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-o-N-P 



WDAY o-o-N-o 
KFYR o-o-N-o 



MINNESOTA 

WCCO o-o-o-5 
KSTP A-A-N-o 



' WI5C0NSIN 

fWTAQ l-o-4-o 

'WEBC A-A-N-P 

WISN o-o-o-5 



ONTARIO 
CKGW L-o-o-o 
/CFRB o-o-4-o 



QUEBEC 



' NEW 

•Work 



NEBRASKA 

WOW A-A-o-o 



IOWA 

KOIL 1-0-4-5 
KSCJ l-o-4-o 
WHO A-A-o-o 
WMT l-o-4-o 



MISSOURI 



WENR o-o-N-P 
WMAQ o-o-o-5 



NN DIANA 



WGL 1-0-4-5 



WREN WIN 
KFH l-o-4-o 



TEXAS \ KFJF 
WKY 1 



KRLD l-o-4-o 
WBAP o-o-o-P 
KPRC o-o-N-P 
KTSA l-o-o-o 
W0A1 A-A-N-P 



KMBC o-o-4-! 
KMOX o-o-o-! 
KWK 0-M-N-1 



OHIO 
I WSPD l-o-o-5 
WGAR L-o-N-o 
WHK o-o-o-5 
WADC o-o-o-5 
WKBN 1-2-4-0 
WAIU Vo-4-0 
WLW L-o-o-o 
|WSAI A-A-o-o/ 
(VKRC o-a-o-5 



CFCF L-o-N-o / 

■WBEN A-A-B 
WGR l-o-o-o 
WKBW 0-0-0-5 
WHAM L-o-o- P 
PENNSYLVANIA 

KDKA L-o-o-o 

WCAE A-A-o-o 

WJAS 1-0-4-5 

WLBW 1-0-4-5 

WCAU 1-2-0-5 

WFI A-A-o-o 

MARYLAND 



VERMONT\ IME.1 

,WCSH A-A-B-B 
,WBZ L-o-N-o 
NH.JWEEI o-o-B-B 
IWNAC l-o-o-o 
mass. WORC l-o-4-o 
^-r-^WTAG A-A-o-o 
con»./ r ^wEAN o-2-o-o 
WJAR A-A-B-B 
TIC A-A-B-B 
WDRC l-o-4-o 
[WABC 1-2-3-5 
, .WEAF A-A-B-B 
N '7 WJZ L-M-N-P 
WGY o-o-B-B 
WFBL 0-2-4-5 



KTHS o-o-N-l 
KLRA 1-0-4' 



WCKY L-o-o-P 
WHAS o-o-N-P 

Kentucky rr?rr~ 

r 2 tTnnESSEE 

WLAC o-o-4-o 
WMC o-o-N-o WSM 0-0-0-P 
WREC o-o-o-5 WOOD l-o-4-cy 



/WTAR o-o-4-o 
WRVA L-o-N-P 
WDBJ__H>4-o_ 

CAROLINA 

WPTF L-o-N-P 
WWNC l-o-4-o 



1 ,WMAL l-o-o-o 
(PWRC L-o-N-o 

J WBAL L-M-o-o 

MNCAO 1-2-4-5 



^S. CAROLINA 



TMiSSiSSIPPI 

Louisiana JwjdX o-o-N-Pi wW > ( o-0-0-P\ WSB O-O-N-P 
JWBRC o-o-4-o\ 

AL ABAMA__\_6£ORGIA_ 
FLORIDA 



WSMB o-o-N-P 



WFLAL-o-N-P 
WJAX L-o-N-P 
_WI0D L-o-N-P 
WDBO o-o-4-o 
/WDAE o-o-4-o 



TUESDAY— LOCAL PROGRAMS 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

6:00 P. M. — Air Juniors, WENR. 

6:00 — Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 

6:00 — Dance Music, WCAO. 

6:15 — Dinner Timers (dance), WBEN. 

6:30 — Over Coffee Cups (drama), KDKA. 

7:00 — Mike and Herman (humor), WBBM. 

7:05 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 

7:15— Home Songs, WPTF. 

7:15 — Reek Revelers (song hits), KDKA. 

7:30 — Sacred Song Concert, KDKA. 

7:30 — Blue Coal Concert Hour, WHAM. 

7:45— Harold Teen (comic), WGN. 

7:45— Ginger Boys, WBZ. 

8:00 — Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 

8:00 — Footlight Echoes, WOR. 

8:10 — Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 

8:15 — Uncle Walt and Skcezix (comic), 

WGN. 
8:30 — Mabel Garrison (concert), WBAL. 
8:30— Gloom Chasers (humor), WKBW. 
8:30— Swedish Orchestra, WCCO. 
8:45 — Tiptop Schoolhouse (theatrical), WBZ. 



8:45— Spa Lumber (piano), KWK. 

9:00— Melody Boys, CFRB. 

9:30 — Lammert's Salon Orchestra, KWK. 

9:30 — Werk Bubble Blowers (popular), 
WLW. 
10:00 — McCann Hour (theatrical), WOR. 
10:00 — Canadian Concert, all "CN" stations. 
10:00— C. G. E. Vagabonds, CKGW. 
10:15— The Chatterbox, WKBW. 
10:30 — Musical Round-up (variety), WCFL. 
10:30— Langlcy Hour (band), WTAR. 
10:30 — Alamo Bank Program, WOAI. 
11:00 — Cotton Queen Minstrels, WLW. 
1 1 :00 — Palais Royal Dance Orchestra, WBEN. 
11:00 — Marylanders (dance), WBAL. 
11:00— News, KYW. 
11:15— Casey at the Bat, KOA. 
1 1 :20— Louie's Hungry Five (comic), WGN. 
11:30 — General Electric (classical), KOA. 
11:30— Black Hawk, KSTP. 
11:30 — Dan and Sylvia (sketch), WMAQ. 
11:30— Wayne King (dance), KYW. 
11:45— Sports Slices, WLW. 
12:00 — Jack Albin and His Orchestra (from 
Hotel Pennsylvania, New York), 
WTIC, WRC, WHO, KSD, WEAF, 
WBEN, WGY, WTAM. 



12:00 



12:00 

12:00 
12:00 
12 to 
12:00 
12:15 
12:15 
12:30 
12:30 
12:30 



12:30 



12:30 
1:00 
1:00 
1:30 

2:00 
2:00 



Harry Richman's Orchestra, WENR, 
WREN, KFAB, WJZ, WGAR, 
WMC, WSM. 
— Bert Lown's Orchestra, WNAC, 

WABC, WCAU, WEAN. 
—Dance Music, KYW. 
— Dance music, WGN. 

3 — Dance Music, WMAQ. 
—Witching Hour (semi-classic), WKRC. 

Village Rhymester, KWK. 
— Bcrnie, Whiteman, Gendron, WBBM. 
—Hotel Orchestra, KWK. 
to 2 — Dance Music, WLW. 
—Verne Buck and His Orchestra (from 
Drake Hotel, Chicago) , WSB, WGN, 
WREN, KWK, WJZ, WGAR, WMC, 
WSM. 
— Nocturne (Ann Leaf, organist; Ben 
Alley, tenor), KFH, WNAC, WABC, 
WCAU, WEAN, KTSA, WTAR. 
— Romanelli's Orchestra, CKGW. 
— Nighthawk Frolic, WDAF. 
Dance Music, KTSA. 
Olympic Club, Los Angeles (boxing), 

KFWB. 
Dance Music, KFWB. 
Midnight Merrymakers, KWK. 



CBS 

8:00 — Morning Devotions. 

8:30 — Tony's Scrap-book. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
10 to 12 — Radio Home-Makers. 
12 to 2:30 — Music. 

2:10 — School of the Air. 

3 to 5 — Music. 

NBC— BLUE 

7:45 — Jolly Bill and Jane (East). 

8:45 — Jolly Bill and Jane (West). 
10:15 — Frances Ingram. 
10:45 — Josephine Gibson. 
12:30 — Farm and Home. 

2:15— Irma Glen at Organ. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 

NBC— RED 

8:00 — Gene and Glenn (East). 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:00 — Gene and Glenn (West). 

9:15 — Campbell's Orchestra. 

9:45— A. & P. 
11:15 — Radio Household. 

2:30 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30 — Golden Gems. 



May, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 23 



KGW L-L-o-o 
KOIN o3-oo 



COLORADO 
KOA L L B-B 
KLZ 3 o-5 

UTAH 
KDYL 3-0-0 
KSL o-o B B 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO L Loo 
KFRC 3o 5 
KECA L-L-o-o 
KHJ 03-0-0 
KFSD L-L-o-o 



ARIZONA 
KTAR L-L-o-o 



MINNESOTA 



WCCO 2 3 4 5 
KSTP A ABB 



5 DAKOTA 

WNAX o-3-o-5 



'WISCONSIN 

/wTAO 0-0-05 
'WEBC A ABB 

WISN o-3 0-o 
\WTMJ L-L-o-o 



ONTARIO 



QUEBEC / NEW IVERKONT 

CFCF 00 P /-^ORK 

-WBEN A-A-B-B 
WGR 2 34 
WHAM L Loo 
WHEC o-3-o-o 



KFAB L-L-o-o 
WOW A-A-B-B 



IOWA 

KOIL 2-3-4-5 
KSCJ o-3-o-5 
WHO A-A-o 
WMT o-3-o 5 



ILLINOIS 



7 KYW L-L-o-o 
WGN o-o-B-B 

WIBO A-A-o-o 

WMAQ 2-0 4-0 

sWJJD o-3-oo 



MNDIANA 



WOWO 0-0-4-5 
WGL 20-0-0 



WREN L-L-o-P 
WIBW 03-0-0 
KFH o-3-o-o 



KMBC 2-3-0-5 
t WDAF A-A-B-B 
IKMOX 2-3-4-5 
USD A-A-B-B 

KWK L-L-o-o 



OHIO 
WSPD 2-3-4-0 
WTAM A-A-o-o 
WGAR L-L-o-o 
WHK 2-0-4-0 
WADC 23 45 
WKBN 3 0-5 
WAIU o-3-o-o 
WLW L Loo/ 
JWSAI _A A.B 'B 
iWKRCsP-3-4-0 



KFJF 7 3 o 5 I ARKANSAS 
, WKY o-o-B 



WBAP o-o B-B 1 
WRR 2-3-o-o 
WACO o-3o-o 
KPRC o-o-B-B 
KTRH o-3 0-0 
KTSA o-3-o-o 
WOAI L LB B 



KTHS L-L-B B 
I KLRA 0-3-0-5 



WHAS L-LB-B 

'KENTUCKY ^_ 

WLAC 0-3-0-5 
WREC 23oo WDOD oi < 



PENNSYLVANIA 

KDKA L-L 0-0 
WCAE A A-o-o 
WJAS 0-3-4-5 
WLBW 0-3-4 5 
WHP 1-3-0 5 
WCAU 1 3-4 5 
WFI A . . . 

1ARYLAND 
VIRGINIA 



<VTAR 13 0° 
WRVA L-L-B B 
WOBJ l_3_ojL 



LOUISIANA 

WOSU 2 3-oo 
WSMB L-L 1 



IwJDX L-L-o-o 



WSB I. L " " 
. WTOC 1 3-0-" 
WBRCo-3o-5\wGST2-3oo 

6EORGiA_ 
F LORIOA 



CAROL 

WBT 1300 
WPTF L-L B-B 
WWNC 1 3-0-5 



WFLA o-o-B-B 

~"WJAX L-L-B-B 

WIOD L-L B-B 

WQAW1 13oo 

r-WOBO 1 3oo 

/WDAE 1 3oo 



I ME ) 

WLBZ l-3-o-o 
IWCSH A-A-B-B 
WBZ L Loo 
WEEI A A 
'WNAC 1 3-4-0 
WORC 1-3-0-5 
WTAG A ABB 
iWEAN 1 o-4-o 
WJAR A A B-B 
WTIC A-A-B-B 
WORC 1 3-0-5 
WABC 1 3 4 5 
..EAF A-A-B-B 
WJZ L-L-M-N 
WGY A-A-B-B 
WFBL 2-3-4-0 
WPG 1 3 0-0 
WMAL 1-0-4-5 
WRC A-A-B B 
WBAL L Loo 
,WCAO 1 345 



TUESDAY, MAY 5-12-19-26 



8 Eastern 
Daylight 



11 



East. Standard 
ent. Daylight 



6 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Iue5cLd.y 
Play 5, 12, 19, 26 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Blackstone Plantation: Julia Sanderson and Frank 

Crummit. 
B — Florsheim Frolic: Coon-Sanders Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Paul Whiteman's Paintmen. 
M — Breyer Leaf Boys. 
N — Adventures of Polly Preston. 
P — Three Mustachios. 
CBS 

1 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 

2 — Lowell Thomas. 

3 — Old Gold Character Readings. 

4 — Kaltenborn Edits the News. 

5 — Lee Morse. 

— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



9 Eastern 
Daylight 



8 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



7 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



WASHINGTON 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — McKesson Musical Magazine: Concert orchestra. 
B— Happy Wonder Bankers: Orchestra; male trio. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Household Celebrities Program: Orchestra. 
M — Death Valley Days: Dramatic sketch. 

CBS 
1 — Henry-George. 

2 — Philco Symphony Concert: Howard Barlow, con- 
ductor. 

— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



ONTARIO 



QUEBEC 



|VERMONT\ I ME. I 

\ V" ' 



/-Aork V~" I WLBZ 0-0-2-2 

-WBEN A-A-B-BV ) IWQSH A-A-B-B 
WGR I-I-0-0 I /mm WBZ L-L-M-M 

WHAM L-L-M-M W- WEEI A-A-B-B 

_2-2 Tmass. 




WNAC 11-2-2 
-WTAG A-A-B-B 
r WEAN 11-2-2 
w WJAR A-A-B-B 
WTIC A A-B B 
.WORC l-1-o-o 
WABC 112-2 
njWEAF A-A-B-B 
/WJZ L-L-M-M 
WGY o-o-B-B 
WFBL 1-1-22 



>WMAL 1-1-2 2 
WRC A-A-B-8 



WFLA A A MM 

-WJAX A A MM 

WIOD AA MM 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ A A A A 
KOMO A A A A 
KOL lo3 3 
KFPY 1 0-3-3 
OREGON 

KGW A AAA 
KOIN 1 033 

COLORADO 
KOA A AAA 
KLZ 1233 

UTAH 
KOYL 1233 
KSL A A A A 

NEVADA 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO A A A A 
KFRC 1 o33 
KECA A A A A 
KFI A A A A 
KHJ 1-0 3-3 
KFSO A A A A 

ARIZONA 
KTAR A A A A 



WDAY A A A A 
KFYR A AAA 



MINNESOTA 



WCCO 1 2 3 3 
, KSTP A AAA 



5 DAKOTA 

WNAX oo33 



NEBRASKA 
WOW A A A A 



KOIL 1233 
KSCJ oo-3-3 
WMT 0-0-3-3 



/WISCONSIN 

WEBC AAA A 
WISN 1-0-3-3 
WTMJ A AAA 

ILLINOIS 



WBBM 1-0-3-3 
WENR L-L-o-o 
WGN o-o-M-o 
WIBO A AAA 
\WMAQ o-2-o-o 




t.t ONTARIO QUEBEC / 

\ ^CKGW L-L-o-o CFCF o-o-o-Nf 
\J CFRB o-o-3-3 -^WBE^ 



WREN L-L-M-N 
WIBW oo33 
KFH 1233 



,WBCM o-o-3-3 
IWXYZ 123 3 
WJR L-L-M-N 
WWJ A AAA 



OHIO 
WSPD 1233 
WTAM AAA A 
„iWGAR o-o-M-N 
WOWO 1-2-3-3 WHK 12-3-3 
WFBM 1-0-3-3 JJSSc 1.2-3-3 
WKBN 1-0-3-3 
WLW o-o-M-o 
WSAI A AAA"-' 
'KRC 1,2-3-3 




-W8EN AAA 
WGR o-2-o-o 
WKBW 1-0-3-3 
WHAM L-L-M-N 



PENNSYLVANIA 
KDKA L-L-M-N 
WCAE A AAA 
WJAS 1-2-3-3 
WLBW 1-0-0-0 
WHP 0-0-3-3 
WCAU 1-2-3 3 
: l A-A-A-A. 

1ARYLAN0 



OKLAHOMA 

KFJF 1 o : 




ARKANSAS 
KLRA 123 3 



WHAS A-A-AA 

•^CNJUCKY ——-^rrr 

=[ ENNE55EE 

WMC A A A A 
WREC 1-0-3-3 
WLAC 1 2 3 3 
WSM AAA A 
WOOD o_o_3_3 



/WTAR 1-0-3-3 
WRVA A A A A 
vTrginiaJNDB1_L±H- 
n carolina 

WBT 123 3 
WWNC 1-0-3-3 



IWLBZ oo33 
IWCSH A A A A 
'nhWBZ o-o-M-o 

.WEEI A AAA 

•mass WNAC 1-2-3-3 
i^-«r-vWTAG A-A-A-A 
C0NN/ Rl y WEAN 1-2-3-3 
^WJAR A-A-A-A 
\yWTIC A-A-A-A 
SSWDRC 0-2-3-3 

WABC 1-2-3-3 
WEAF A-A-A-A 
'. 'JZ L-L-M-N 
WHEC 1-0-3-3 
WFBL 1-2-33 

WPG o-o-3-3 

■WMAL 12-3-3 

WRC A-A-A-A 
WBAL o-o-M-o 
WCAO 1-2-3-3 




^S. CAROLINA 



TMTssissipi^T 



LOUISIANA 

WOSU 1 233 
WSMB A A A A 



WSB A A A_A 
■ WTOC oo 3 3 
^WJDX A A A AwAPI A A A A WGST 1 -0-3-3 
IWBRC 1-2-3 ' 



GEORGIA 



WFLA AAA A 

~WJAX A-A-A-A 

WIOD AAA A 

WQAM o-o-3 3 

. r-fWDBO o-o-3 3 

/WDAE o-o-3-3 



■J C\ Eastern r\ East. Standard Q Cent. Standard 

1 U Daylight 7 Cent. Daylight O Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — B. A. Rolfe and His Lucky Strike Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Works of Great Composers. 
M— Clara, Lu and Em: Humorous skit. 
N — Gene Austin: Crooner. 

CBS 

1 — Graybar's Mr. and Mrs.: Joe and Vi. 

2 — Blue Ribbon Malt Jesters: Richie Craig. 

3 — Paramount Publix Radio Playhouse: With Morton 

Downey. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



Eastern 
Daylight 



1 r\ East. Standard 
1U Cent. Daylight 



9< lent. Standard 
Mf. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Rapid Transit: Sketches of metropolitan life. 
B — Cab Calloway and His Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Slumber Music. 
M — Amos 'n' Andy. 
N — Kate Smith: Crooner. 
P— Mound City Blue Blowers: Novelty orchestra. 

CBS 
1 — Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. 
2 — Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. 
3 — Pryor's Cremo Band. 
4 — Romanelli and His King Edward Orchestra: From 

Toronto, Canada, 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ M o o o 
KOMO M-oo-o 
KOL 1 3oo 
KFPY o3oo 



NEW 
YORK 

KBW o 3 4 
WHAM L-L-o 
WHEC 13oo 

WFBL o 3 o o 

PENNSYLVANIA 

KDKA o Loo 

WCAE A o oo 

WJAS I 3oo 

WLBW 134 4 

WHP 1 o-4 4 

WCAU 1 o 4 4 

WFI A B B B_ 

MARYLANO 





me ; 

WCSH A o oo 

WEEI A ooo 
WNAC o-2-o-o 
WORC 1 2 4 4 

■WEAN o-2-o-o 
■WJAR A ooo 



.WTIC o B B-B 
WDRC 1 24 4 
ABC 124 4 
WEAF A B B B 
N J,WJZ L L M P 

WPG oo 4 4 



,WMAL o-o4 4 
fWRC o B B B 
./ 
WCAO I -0-4-4 



( Al II0RN1A 

KGO M o o o 
KFRC 1 3oo 
KECA M o oo 
KHJ o 3oo 
KFSD M ooo 



Page 



-4 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6-13-20-27 



WA5HINGTON 



Eastern 
Daylight 



4 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



3 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 
NBC (Red) 

A — The Lady Next Door: Children's feature. 

B — Tea Timers. 

C — Rex Cole Mountaineers. 

NBC (Blue) 

L — Chats with Peggy Winthrop. 

M- — Jolly Junketeer: Children's program. 

N — Ivy Scott: Soprano. 

P— Little Orphan Annie: Dramatic skit. 

R — Market and Business Reports. 

CBS 

1 — Asbury Park Casino Orchestra. 
2 — Bert Lown Orchestra. 
3 — Tony's Scrap-book. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



COLORADO 
KOA o-M-B o 
KLZ 11-2 3 

UTAH 



CALIFORNIA 
KCO o-M-o-o 



N. DAKOTA 

WOAY N 00 



\WABC 11-23 
, twEAF A ABC 
/n. .fWJZ L M PR 

7WRC A A Bo 




Mt 1 

,WCSH 00 Bo 

nhwBZ L-oP-o 
WEEI 0-0-B-o 
mass WTAG A A 00 

IwjAR A A Bo 
iWDRC 1 123 



WREN L-o-o-o 
KFH 1 1 0-3 



TEXAS \ KFJF 
WKY 



KRLD 1123 



Wednesday 
i^ay 6, 13, 10, 17 



WDSU 1-1-2-3 
WSMB Loop 



WASHINGTON 

KOI 0-2-00 



OREGON 
KGW M-o-o-o 



COLORADO 
KOA M o-A-Q 
KLZ 1-o-o-o 

UTAH 

KDYL 1-2-00 



N DAKOTA 



MINNESOTA 



WCCO 12-0-0 



S DAKOTA 



NEBRASKA 



KFAB M-o-o-o 



KANSAS 

WREN M-o-o-o 
KFH 02-0-0 



KOIL o-2-o-o 
KSCJ 12oo 
WMT 1-o-o-o 



MISSOURI 



KSD o-o-A-o 



OKLAHOMA 
TEXAS \ KFJF 1-2-0-0 




KLRA 12oo 



LOUISIANA 

WDSU o-2-o-o 




u 



....WBZ o-o-o-R 
NM WNAC 0-0-34 
WORC 00-3-0 

f"',WEAN o-o-3-o 

VDRC 1-0-3-0 
,JVABC 1-2-3-4 
lWEAF A-A-A-o 
JWJZ L-N-P-R 
' WOKO 00-3-0 



6 Eastern 
Daylight 



Cent. Daylight 



4 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



WMAL 1-2-3-0 

wbal\-npr 

WCAO 1-2-3-0 



WFLA o-o-o-R 
WJAX o-o-o-R 
\N100 o-o-o-K 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Black and Gold Room Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Raising Junior: Domestic skit. 
M — Smith Ballew's Orchestra. 
N — Conti Gondoliers. 
P — Gloria Gay's Affairs. 
R — Lowell Thomas. 

CBS 
1 — Bill Schudt's Going to Press. 
2 — Winegar's Barn Orchestra. 
3 — Tidewater Inn: Roy Atwell, comedian. 
4 — Eno Crime Club: Mystery serial. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



Eastern 
Daylight 



6 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



5 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Boswell Sisters: Vocal and instrumental trio. 

B — Science Speaks. 

C — Boscul Moments: Mine. Alda. 

D— William Hard. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Amos 'n' Andy. 

N — Silver Masked Tenor: Joseph White; string trio. 
P — Phil Cook. 

CBS 
1 — Morton Downey: Freddie Rich's orchestra. 
2 — Dance Orchestra. 
3 — Evangeline Adams. 
4 — Daddy and Rollo. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



NH WBZ L0P0 

.WNAC o-o-3-4 

-K^TWORC 1-o-o-o 

rm^rTi'WEAN oo 3 4 
WJAR Loo 




CALIFORNIA 

KGO A-BP-D 

KPO o Bo o 
KECA o-o-o-D 
KFI o-B-P-o 
KFSD o-o-PD 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-O-P-o 



WFLA L o P 

WJAX LoP o 

r-WIOD L o P o 

/WOBO o 2 o o 



WEDNESDAY— LOCALS 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

6:00— Ismak Speaking, WCAU. 
6:00— Air Juniors, WENR. 
6:00 — Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 
6:15 — Cru-Bro Troubadours, KDKA. 
6:15 — Dinner Timers (dance), WBEN. 
6:30— Kendall Royal Purple Players, WHAM. 
6:45— Sidelights on World Capitals, WHN. 
7:00 — Mike and Herman (comic), WBBM. 
7:00— The Couple Next Door, KYW. 
7:00 — Bedlington's Orchestra, CFCA. 
7:05 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:15 — Twenty Fingers of Sweetness, KDKA 
7:15 — Wolverine Serenadcr, WBZ. 
7:45 — Harold Teen (comic), WGN. 
8:00 — Corncob Pipe Club (variety), WRVA. 
8:00— On Wings of Song, WHAM. 
8:00 — Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 
8:00— WOR Minstrels, WOR. 
8:00— Adam and Eve (comic), WXYZ. 
8:10 — Deacon's Dicta (comic), WCCO. 
8:15 — Uncle Walt and Skcezix (comic), 
WGN. 



8:15 — Dupont Speed Blenders (comic), WBZ. 

8:30 — Gloom-chasers (humorous), WKBW. 

8:45— Sports Review by Tom Hanes, WTAR. 

8:45— Jack Turner, WHAS. 

9:00 — Ebbett's Field Boxing, WHN. 

9:00 — Charlie Hamp (piano), WBBM. 

9:00— R. T. I. Review (dance), KDKA. 

9:00— Comedy Skit, WSMB. 

9:00 — Hood Modern Concert (dance), WBZ. 

9:15 — Vocal Duo "Happy Go Lucky Boys," 
WTAR. 

9:30 — The Buddy Boys (music and bur- 
lesque), WLW. 

9:30 — The Smith Family (drama), WMAQ. 

9:30— Cinco Night Club (drama), WCAO. 
10:00 — Musicale Novelesk (popular), WLW. 
10:00 — Wecner Minstrels, WENR. 
10:15 — Puzzle Contest, KWK. 
10:30 — Musical Round-up (variety), WCFL. 
10:30 — Poets' Hour, WSPD. 
10:30— Drama, WGR. 
11:00— News, KYW. 

1 1:20— Hcrr Louie and the Weasel, WGN. 
11:30— Dan and Sylvia (sketch), WMAQ. 
11:30— Locw Hour (vaudeville), WHN. 
11:30 — Concert Hour, CPRY. 
11:30— Old Spanish Singing School, WHK. 



11:45— Sports Slices, WLW. 

12:00— Dance Music, WMAQ. 

12:00— Dance Music, KYW. 

12:00— Dance Music, WGN. 

12:00— Witching Hour (semi-classic) , WKRC. 

12:00— St. Moritz Orchestra, KFH, WABC, 

KTSA, WTAR. 
12:00 — Henry Busse and His Orchestra, 

WBAL, WJZ. 
12:00 — Florence Richardson and Her Orches- 
tra, WRC, WENR, WEAF, WGY. 
12:15 — Bcrnie, Whiteman, Gendrons, WBBM. 
12:15— Village Rhymester, KWK. 
12:30— Nocturne (Ann Leaf), KFH, WABC, 

KTSA, WTAR. 
12:30 — Wayne King and His Orchestra, KOA, 

WREN, WBAL, WJR, WJZ, WGAR, 

WMC, KPRC. 
12:30— Joe Morgan's Orchestra, WRC, WEAF, 

WTAM. 
12:30— Stage and Screen Stars, WPAP. 
12:30 — Crosley Theater of Air (drama), 

WLW. 
1 to 3 — Nighthawk Frolic (popular) , WDAF. 
2:00 — Midnight Merry-makers (requests), 

KWK. 
2:00— Dance Music, KFWB. 



CBS 

8:00 a. M. — Morning Devotions. 

8:45— Old Dutch Girl. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
10 to 12 — Radio Home-Makers. 
12 to 2:30 P. M. — Music. 

2:30 — American School of the Air. 

3 to 5 — Music. 

NBC— RED 

8:00 (E. D. in East, C. D. in West) — 
and Glenn. 

8 :30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell's Orchestra. 

9:45— A. & P. 
10:30 — Betty Crocker. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

3:30 P. M. — Radio Play Bill. 
NBC— BLUE 

7:45 a. M. — Jolly Bill and Jane. 
10:00 — Mary Hale Martin. 
12:H1 p. M. — National Farm and Home. 

2:15 — Organ (Irma Glenn). 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:00 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

4:00 — Eastman Symphony. 

4:30 — Mabel Wayne. 



May, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 25 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ A Bo 
KGMO A-B-o-o 
KOL 0-0-4-4 
KFPY oo4-4 

OREGON 
KGW A Boo 
KOIN 0-0-4-4 



COLORADO 
KOA A B-C-C 
KLZ 0-0-4-4 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A-B-0-0 



WDAY A 00 
KFYR A 0-0-0 



QUEBEC /NEW 

CFCF looo_f 'ORK 

,WBEN A B-C-C 
WGR 2-0-4-4 
WKBW o-3-o-o 
WHAM L-L-M-M 




I |«|WLBZ 1-o-oo 
HJWCSH A B-C-C 



WEDNESDAY, MAY 6-13-20-27 



WBZ M-M 
N.MWEEI A-B-C-C 
_ WNAC 1 3 4 4 
MAS5 WORC 1 000 
■WTAG A B C C 
WEAN 1344 
WJAR o-B-C-C 
"WTIC A-B-C-C 
WDRC 3 4 4 
. WABC 1-344 
C .WEAF A-B-C-C 
WJZ LL MM 
WGY A-o-CC 
WFBL 2 34 4 
WPG 1 3-oo 
..'MAL 134 4 
WRC A-B-C-C 
WBAL L L M M 
WCAO 13-4 4 

Wednesday 
I^ay 6, 0, 10, 17 



8 Eastern 
Daylight 



7 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



6 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



"WFUTA-B-o 
W100 A Boo 
WQAM 1-0-0 

_ WDBO 1 -o-o-o 
/WDAE 1-0-0-0 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Listerine Program: Bobby Jones' golf chats. 
B — Radiotron Varieties: Soloists and orchestra. 
C — Mobiloil Concert: Soloist and orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Harbor Lights: Dramatic tales of the sea. 
M — Canadian Pacific Musical Crusaders: Soloists; 
mixed chorus; orchestra. 

CBS 
1 — Pryor's Cremo Band. 
2 — Lowell Thomas. 
3 — Barbosol Program. 
4 — Sunkist Musical Cocktail. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



9 Eastern 
Daylight 



8 



East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



7 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 
NBC (Red) 

A — Halsey Stuart Program: Guest speaker; symphony 

orchestra. 
B — Palmolive Hour: Soloists; the Revelers quartet; 

orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Compana Program: Drama. 
M — Camel Pleasure Hour: Soloists and orchestra. 

CBS 

1 — Gold Medal Fast Freight: Quartet and organist. 
2 — Arabesque: Desert story. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ A ABB 
KOMO A A B B 
KOL H-o-o 
KFPY 1 1 o-o 



NEW 
YORK 



ONTARIO QUEBEC / 

CKGW A ABB f 1 

.WBEN A A B B 
WKBW 1122 
WHAM L-L-M-M 
WGY A A B B 




IwCSH A-Aoo 

' N „WBZ 00 M M 
WEEI A A B B 

•F^STWNAC " °° 
WTAG A-A-B-B 

.WEAN ll-oo 
WJAR A-A-B-B 
WTIC o-o-B-B 
WORC 1-1-2-2 
. WABC 1 1-2-2 
C .WEAF A A B B 
.WJZ L-L-M-M 
JWFBL l-l-o-o 
WPG oo-2-2 
iWMAL o-o-2-2 
IWRC A-A-B B 
WBAL L-L-M-M 
WCAO ll-oo 



CALirORNIA 

KGO A A-B-B 
KFRC 1 1 00 
KFI A A B B 
KHJ 1 loo 



WFLA M M 
WJAX A A MM 
/WIOD o-M M 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ A-A-B-B 
KOMO A ABB 
KOL 1-o3-4 
KFPY 1-0-3-0 
KVI o-o-3-o 
OREGON 



V ONTARIO OUEBEC / NEW IV 

CKGW Alo» CFCF „. M r WRK \ 
CFRBo23 4 CKAC 3 ^WBENAAi 




NEW |VERMONT\ MflWLBZ 00 3-0 

UWCSH o-o-B-B 
WBZ L-L-Lo 
N.H.WEEI A A B B 
■WNAC 1 2 34 
mass WORC o o 3 4 
-WTAG A A B B 
WEAN 1234 
WJAR A A B B 
WTIC A A B B 
. WDRC o234 
WABC 123 4 
WEAF A A B B 
WJZ L L L M 
WFBL 1 o3o 
WOKO oo3o 
WPG o23 4 
MAL 1234 
WRC A A B B 
WBAL L L L M 
WCAO o2 34 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o o B B 



WFLA o n B B 
■WJAX "oBB 
WIOD " olB 



i r\ Eastern r\ East, standard Q Cent. Standard 

1U Daylight 7 Cent. Daylight O Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Palmolive Hour: Soloists; the Revelers quartet; 

orchestra. 
B — Coca Cola Program: Grantland Rice; orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — -Clara, Lu and Em: Humorous skil with incidental 

music. 
M — Poems: Read by Howard M. Claney. 

CBS 
1 — Vitality Personalities. 
2 — Gypsy Trail: Emery Deutsch. 
3 — McAlccr Polishers. 

4— Columbia Concert Corporation Program, 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page S3 



Bast. Standard 



('nil . Standard 



1-j Eastern -| (\ East. Standard f\ Cent, standai 
1 Daylight 1 \J Cent. Daylight 7 Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Nellie Rcvell. 
B — Vincent Lopez. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Slumber Music. 
M — Amos 'n' Andy. 
N — Camel Pleasure Hour. 
P — Wenrich and Connelly. 

CBS 

1 — Columbia Concert Corporation Program. 

2 — Dance Orchestra. 

3 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial hand music. 

4 — Guy Lombardo's Orchestra. 

o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ M ooo 
KOMO M N N N 
KOL 1 3oo 
KFPY o-3-oo 

OREGON 

KGW M N N N 
KOIN o 3"" 

COLORADO 
KOA M N N N 
KLZ 1 3oo 

UTAH 

KOYL »3"» 
KSLMNNN 

NCVAOA 
KOH o3oo 

CALIFORNIA 
KGO M N N N 
KFRC o3 o o 
KECA M N N N 
KFI o N N N 
KHJ o3oo 
KFSD M N N N 

ARIZONA 
KTAR o N N N 







WNAC 124 4 
WORC 12 4 4 

...WEAN 124 4 

^WDRC 12 4 4 

ABC 124 4 
WEAF A B B B 
WJZ L L Po 
NJ /WPG 1 044 

WMAL 1-o-o-o 
WRC A B B B 



WBAP M N N 
WRR o3oo 
WACO o3 o o 
KPRC M N N N 
KTRH o3oo 
KTSA o 3 o o 
WOAI M N N N 



KPLO 



WFLA A Boo 



Page z6 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



THURSDAY, MAY 7-14-21-28 



WASHINGTON 



Eastern 
Daylight 



4 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



3 Cent. Standan 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — The Lady Next Door: Children's program. 

B — Rinso Talkie. 

C — Rex Cole Mountaineers. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Orchestra. 

M — Little Orphan Annie: Dramatic skit 
N — Market and Business Reports. 

CBS 
1 — Will Osborne. 

2 — Mr. and Mrs. F. C. H.: Script act. 
3 — Virginia Arnold: Pianist. 
4 — La Gerardine Program. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



ME J 

\^CSH o-o-B-o 

mi L-L-M-N 

N.H.JWEEI oo-B-o 

"NAC o-o-o-4 

mass. WTAG A-A-B-o 

ccmW'wjAR A-A-B-o 




Thursday 
rtay 7, 14, Z\, £8 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A-A-oo 



WASHINGTON 

KOL 1-2-0-0 



OREGON 



KOA A-A-A-o 
KLZ 12oo 



KGO A-A-A-o 
KFRC 1-2-o-o 




Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Mid-week Hymn Sing: Mixed quartet. 

B — Niagara-Hudson Program: Dramatic sketch. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Amos 'n' Andy. 
M — Tastyeast Jesters. 
N — Phil Cook: One-man show. 
P — Sisters of the Skillet: Comedy skit. 

CBS 
1 — Morton Downey with Freddie Rich's Orchestra. 
2 — St. Moritz Orchestra. 
3 — Chiclets Program. 
4 — Daddy and Rollo. 
— Local Programs. 
1 State and wavelength guides on page 33 



KFRC 0-2-00 
KFI o-o-N-o 
KFSD o-o-N-o 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-o-N-o 



'mm WBZ L-M-N-o 

WNAC 0-0-0-4 

;s "WORC o-o-2-o 

,„rWElN 0-0-0-4 
|C0N "(^WJAR A A o q 

JVTIC A-A-B-B 
' WORC o-o-2-o 

)WABC 1-2-3-4 
JWEAF A-A-B-B 
'n.j/WJZ L-M-N-P 
I WGY o-o-B B 
> WFBL o-o-o-4 



\WMAL 1-2-2-4 
JWRC 0-M-N-0 

WBAL L-o-0-0 

WCAO 1-0-2 4 



KRLD l-o-o-o 
KPRC o-o-N-o 
KTSA 1 2 2-o 



WDSU 122o 
WSMB o-o-N-o I 



WFLA L-M-N-o 

WJAX L-M No 

-WIOD L-M-N-o 

WOAE 2 2-o 



THURSDAY LOCAL PROGRAMS 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

■5:00 — Salon Music, WBAL. 

6:00 — Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 

6:00 — Air Juniors, WENR. 

6:00— KDKA Rondolicrs (classic), KDKA. 

6:15 — Tea Timers (dance), WBEN. 

6:15 — Little Theater of Heart's Desire, WBZ. 

6:30 — Spaidc Shirt Men (dance), KDKA. 

7:00 — Mike and Herman (comic), WBBM. 

7:05 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 

7:30— Glenn Adams' Dog Talks, WLW. 

7:30 — Ohrbachs (movie stars), WOR. 

7:45— Harold Teen (comic), WGN. 

8:00— Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 

8:00— Main Street Sketches, WOR. 

8:00— Phillip's Flyers, KMOX. 

8:10— Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 

8:30 — Gloom-chasers (comic), WKBW. 

8:30— Minstrels, WTAM. 

8:45 — George and Blossom (comic), CTRB. 

9:00 — Delia and Dora, WHK. 

9:00 — Buckingham Boosters, CFRB. 

9:00 — Kraft Theater Party, WMAQ. 



9:15— Kremlin Art Quartet, WOR. 

9:30— Bernard Tholl (baritone), WTAR. 
10:00 — U. S. Naval Academy Band, WBAL. 
10:00 — Scotland Yard (drama), KTSA. 
10:00 — Phelan's Painters (pianos), KWK. 
10:30 — Nahigan Oriental Orchestra, WMAQ. 
10:30 — Concert Va. Federation Music Clubs, 

WTAR. 
10:30— Musical Round-up (variety), WCFL. 
11:00— When Wc Were Twenty-one, WBAL. 
11:00 — Music-box Review, WIBO. 
11:00 — Hollingsworth Hall (popular), WLW. 
1 1 :00 — Northwestern Limited, KSTP. 
11:00 — Palais Royal Dance Orchestra, WBEN. 
11:00 — Canadian Drama Series, all "CNR" sta- 
tions. 
1 1 :00 — Detroit Police Drama, WJR. 
1 1 :00 — Clover Leaf Skipper, CKGW. 
11:00— Drama, KWK. 
11:00— News, KYW. 

11:20 — Herr Louie and the Weasel, WGN. 
11:30 — Dan and Sylvia, WMAQ. 
1 1 : 4 5— Sports Slices, WLW. 
12:00— Old Fiddlers, KTHS. 
12:00 — Mulligan's Orchestra, WCCO. 
12:00 — Dance Music, WMAQ. 
12:00— Old Masters (classic), WLW. 



12:00- 

12:00- 

12:00- 

12:00- 

12:15- 
12:15- 

12:15- 

12:30- 



12:30- 
12:30- 



12:30- 
12:45- 
1 :00- 
1:00- 
2:00- 
2:00- 

2:00- 



-Felix Fcrdinando and His Park Central 

Orchestra, WABC. 
-Folger Coffee Program, KFRC, KHJ, 

KOIN, KDYL, KOL, KVI. 
-Harry Richman's Orchestra, KTHS, 

WREN, WJZ, WJAR, KPRC. 
-Jack Albin and His Orchestra, WTIC, 

WRC, WEAF. 
-Village Rhymester, KWK. 
-Conoco Listeners' Hour (requests), 

KOA. 
-Popular Orchestras, WBBM. 
-Henry Busse Orchestra, KTHS. WJZ, 

WENR, WREN, KFAB, WGAR, 

KVOO. 
-Nocturne, WABC, WTAR. 
-Clyde McCoy's Orchestra (from Chi- 
cago), WRC, KYW, KSD, WEAF, 

WMC, WSM. 
-Witching Hour (semi-classic) , WKRC. 
-Sports, KOA. 
-Dance Music, KYW. 
-Nighthawk Frolic, WDAF. 
-Dance Music, KFWB. 
-Midnight Merry-makers (requests), 

KWK. 
-Dance Music, WLW. 



NBC— BLUE 

7:45 a. M. (E. D. in East. C. D. in West) — 

Jolly Bill and Jane. 
10:00 — Libby McNeil and Libby. 
12:30 p. m. — National Farm and Home. 

1:30 — George the Lava Man. 

2:15 — Organ (Irma Glen). 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 

4:00— Home Decorations. 

NBC— RED 

S:00 (E. D. in East, C. D. in West) — Gene 
and Glenn. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell's Orchestra. 

9:45— A. & P. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 

2:30 p. M. — Edna Wallace Hopper. 
CBS 

8:00 A. M. — Morning Devotions. 

8:30 — Tony's Scrap-book. 

8:45 — Old Dutch Girl. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
10:00 — Radio Home-Makers. 
1 1 :30 — Uneeda Bakers. 

2:30 p. M. — American School of the Air. 



May, 1931 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Page 27 



WA5KIN6TON N DAKOTA 



OREGON 
KGW A A A A 

COLORADO 
KOA A A A A 

UTAH 

KSL A A A A 



WCCO 2-0-4-0 
KSTP A-A-A-A 



5 DAKOTA 

WNAX o-3o-o 



I WTAQ o-3-o-o 
WEBC A A A A 
WISN o-3-o-o 

vWTMJ A-A-o-o 



/MICK.i ONTARIO 

\ ^.CKGW A-A-A-A 
\J SCFRB 03-0-0 



QUEBEC 



NEW,|VERMONT\ 
YORK 



KFAB L-M-N-N 
WOW A AAA 



IOWA 

KOIL 2-0-4-5 

KSCJ o-3-o-o 
WHO A-A-A-A 
WMT o-3o-o 



\WBCM o-3-o-o> 
/WXYZ 2 3 4 5 
WJR L-M-N-N 
WWJ A AAA/ 



r 7 ' 

WBEN A-A-A-A 
WGR 2-3-4-5 
WHAM L-o-N-N 
WGY A-A-A-A 



WREN L-M-N-N 
KFH o-3-o-o 



KFJF 2-3-1 
I WKY A-A-i 



KMBC 2-0-4-5 
WDAF A-A-A-A. 
KMOX 2-0-4-5 
KSD A-A-A-A 
KWK L-M-N-N 



ILLINOIS 



KYW o-M-o-o 
WGN A-A-A-A 
WIBO L-o-N-N 
WMAQ 234o 
\WJJD o-o-o-5 



WOWO oo45 
WGL 2 3oo 
WFBM o-3-o-o 



lVSP0 X 2-o4'5 ^ 
WTAM A-A-A-A | 
WGAR L-M-N-N O 
WHK 2-0-4-5 
WADC 2 3 4 5 
WKBN o-3-o-o 
WAIU o-3-o-o j 
WLW o-M-o-o / 
WSAI A-A-fcA-™™ 
WKRC 0O.45 




I3WLBZ 1-o-o-o 
SWCSH A-A-A-A 



PENNSYLVANIA 



KA L-M-N-N 
WCAE A-A-A-A 
WJAS 0-3-4-5 
WLBW 0-3-4-5 
WHP l-o-o-o 
WCAU 1-0-4-5 
WFI A-A-A-A - 

MARYLAND 



4-5 
4o 
A-A 
5 

A 



KENTUCKY 



WCKY L-o 0-0 
WHAS A-A A-A 



KTHS AAA, 
KLRA 0-3-o-c 



TENNE56EE 

WMC A-A A A 
WREC 2ooo 
WSM A-A-A-A 
WOOD 3oo 



KTAR A-A-A-A 



WBAP A-A o-o 
WRR 2-o-o-o 
KPRC A-A-A-A 
WOAI A-A-A-A 



LOUISIANA 

JwDSU 2-3-0-0 
WSMB A A A-A 



JMiSsiSSIPPI 
-WJDX' A-A-A-A 



IWAP1 AAA 
NBRC o-3-o-o 

ALABAMA 



WSB A-A-A-A 
WJOC 1-o-o-o 
WGST 2-o-o-o 



WTAR 1 000 
WRVA AAA A 
WDBJJJBLi- 

CAROLINA 

WBT 1-o-o-o 
WPTF A-A-A-A 
WWNC l-3-o-o 



WFLA A-A-A-A 
"WJAX A-A-A-A 

WIOD A-A-A-A 

WQAM l-o-o-o 
-WOBO l-o-o-o 

WDAE l-o-o-o 



WB2 o-M-N-N 
WEEI A-A-A-A 
WNAC 1-0 
"^WORC 1-3 
S^YriWTAG A-A 
VWEAN 1-0-4 
, ~_/ WJAR AAA 
WTIC A-A-A-A 
WDRC 1-3-0-0 
WABC 1-3-4-5 
"EAF A-A-A-A 
WJZ L-M-N-N 
WFBL 2-3-4-5 
WPG l-o-o-o 
MAL 1-0-45 
WRC A-A-A-A 
WBAL L-M-N-N 
WCAO 13-4-5 



8 Eastern 
Eastern 



THURSDAY, MAY 7-14-21-28 

7 East. Standard X 

Cent. Daylight O 



Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 






Thursiay 
fW 7, 14, 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Fleischmann Hour: Eudy Vallee. 
L — Dixie Singers. 

M — Rin-tin-tin Thriller: Dog stories. 
N — Salada Salon Orchestra: Vocal and instrumental 
soloists. 

CBS 

1 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 

2 — Lowell Thomas. 

3 — Soloist and Orchestra. 

4r— Kaltenborn Edits the News. 

5 — The Hamilton Watchman: Dramatic skit. 

— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



9 Eastern Q East. Standard '"1 Cent. Standard 

Daylight O Cent. Daylight / Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Arco Birthday Party: "Reincarnated" guests of 
honor. 

B — Jack Frost's Melody Moments. 

NBC (Blue) 

L — Blackstone Plantation: Frank Crummit and Julia 

Sanderson. 
M — Maxwell House Ensemble: Male quartet; orchestra. 
CBS 

1 — Premier Salad Dressers: Brad Browne and Al 

Llewelyn. 
2 — Old Gold Character Readings: Lorna Fantin. 
3 — Detective Story Magazine: Dramatized tales of 

mystery. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ A-A-M-M 
KOMO A-A-M-M 
KOL o-2-o-o 
KFPY o-2-o-o 
KVI o-2-o-o 
OREGON 

KGW A-A-M-M 
KOIN o-2-o-o 

COLORADO 
KOA A-A-M-M 
KLZ o-2-oo 

UTAH 

KDYL o-2-o-o 
KSL A-A-M-M 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO A-A-M-M 
KFRC o-2-o-o 
KECA A-A-M-M 
KHJ o-2-o-o 
KFSD A-A-M-M 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A-A-M-M 



MINNESOTA 



5- DAKOTA 

WNAX o-2-o-o 




:1WLBZ o-2-o-o 
4WCSH A A B B 
WBZ L L MM 
NH WEEI A A o-o 
-WNAC 1 233 
fMASS. WORC o-2 o o 
^TWTAG A A B B 
,-WEAN 1 23 3 
WJAR A A B B 
vWTIC A-A B B 
VDRC 1 2 3 3 

,WABC 12-3 3 

VEAF A-A-B B 

/WJZ L L MM 

>WGY A A B B 

WFBL 1-2-3 3 

WPG o-2 o-o 

MAL 1-0-3 3 
WRC A-A B B 
WBAL L-L-M-M 
WCAO 123 3 



KRLO o-2-o-o 
WBAP A-A-M-M 
WACO o-2-o-o 
KPRC o-o MM 
KTSA o-2-o-o 
WOAI A-A-M-M 



WDSU o-2-o-o 
WSMB A-A-M-M 



[Mississippi , 
JDX A-A-M-M 

WAPI A AM 



WAPI A-A-M-Wk GST 2 . . 
WBRC o-2-o-o \WW»' 

ALABAMA \ GEORGIA^ 



WFLA A A MM 
WJAX A-A M M 
WIOD A A M M 
WQAM o-2-o-o 
•WDBO o-2-o-o 
WDAE o-2-o-o 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ A Aoo 
KOMO A A o 
KOL I 1 o o 
KFPY 1 1 oo 




ME J 

WCSH A A A-A 

BZ o o Mo 
IWEEI A A A A 
. WNAC 1-1-2-3 
WTAG A A A A 

WEaN 1-1-2-3 
WJAR A A-A A 
TIC A A-A A 
WDRC 1 1 oo 
WABC 1 1-2-3 
WEAF A A A A 
WJZ L L M N 
_ WFBL 1123 
WMAL 1123 
WRC A A A A 



ml 



WFLA A A A A 
WJAX A A A A 
WIOO A A A A 



1 A Eastern r\ Bast. Standard Q Cent.Standar 
1U Daylight 7 Cent. Daylight O Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — B. A. Rolfe and His Lucky Strike Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Echoes of the Opera: Vocal soloists. 
M — Clara, Lu and Em. 
N — Cub and Scoop: Sketch. 

CBS 

1 — The Lutheran Hour: Religious service from St. 

Louis. 

2 — Fortune Builders: Douglas Gilbert interviews busi- 
ness men. 
3 — Soloist and Orchestra. 
o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



1i Eastern 1 A East. Standard f\ Cent. Standai 
1 Daylight 1 V Cent. Daylight 7 Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Rapid Transit: sketch based on metropolitan life, 
B — Cab Calloway's Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Slumber Music. 
M — Amos 'n' Andy. 
N — Kate Smith: Crooner. 
R — Amos 'n' Andy. 
S — Gcorgo Ku Trio: Hawaiian music. 

CBS 

1 — Jack Denny and Orchestra: Prom Montreal. 

2 — Jack Denny. 

3 — Pryor"s Cremo Band. 

4 — Radio Round-up. 

o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



"7 



KM [ 
WNAI 
.-.OKI I ,' ' < 

Wllf A B B B 

WORC 111 

MWABC 124 4 

W1AF A B B B 

NJ WJZ LL NS 




NEVADA 
KOH o3oo 



( ALIIORNIA 

KGO «»»« 
KFRC n 3 oo 
KECA no R n 
KHJ »3»« 
KFSD o o R n 



WfU L L 



Page 28 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 1 93 1 



FRIDAY, MAY 1-8-15-22-29 



5 Eastern 
D 



aylight 



East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



3 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



WASHINGTON 
KOL 1 1 1 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — The Lady Next Door: Children's program. 
B — Benjamin Moore Triangle. 
C — Rex Cole Mountaineers. 
D — Tea Timers. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — The Pilgrims. 

N — Little Orphan Annie: Dramatic skit. 
P — Market and Business Reports. 

CBS 
1 — Light Opera Gems. 
2 — Tony's Scrap-hook. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



COLORADO 
KLZ 1 1-1-2 



WOAY A A Bo 
KFYR A-A-B-0 



SH n-o-B-o 

5 <="WBZ o-N-0-0 
sWUO AA-B-D 
onn/^Jm/Sr A-A-o-0 
l/TIC 0-0-B-o 




TpvAS \ KFJF 

^ WKY 

KVOO 



Friday 
Fjay I, 8. 15, Hi. i9 



WFI1A o-o-B-o 
WJAX 0-0-B-o 
WIOO o-O-B-o 




VERMONT \ I ME I 

JWCSH A-o-0-0 

WBZ 00-0-P 

N.H WNAC 0-0-2-3 

_ -WORC 0-0-2-0 

mass WTAG 0-0-B-o 

(c^Vr^We'aN o-o-2-O 
WDRC 1 1 0-0 
WABC 1-1-2-3 
'WEAF A-B-B-o 
WJZ L-M-N-P 
' N .WFBL 1-1-0-0 
'"0K0 0-0-2-0 



Eastern 
Daylight 



5 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



4 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



1 ~ pia U 

IV 1 — /WMAL o-o2-o 

wba/ L-M-N-P 



KGO A B B : 
KFRC 11-0-0 



WFLA o-O-o-P 
WJAX 00-0-P 
\N100 o-o-o-P 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — The World in Music: Pierre Key. 
B — Black and Gold Room Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Raising Junior: Domestic skit. 
M — Smith Ballew Orchestra. 
N — Sundial Bonnie Laddies. 
P — Lowell Thomas. 

CBS 
1 — Winegar's Barn Orchestra. 
2 — Tidewater Inn: Roy Atwell, comedian. 
3 — Eno Crime Club: Serial story. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



7 Eastern 
Daylight 



6 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



5 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Major Bowes' Family: Prom the Capitol Theater. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Amos 'n' Andy. 
M — Boscul Moments: Mme. Alda. 
N— Phil Cook. 
P — Male Quartet. 

CBS 
1 — Morton Downey. 
2 — American Mutual Program. 
3 — Dance Orchestra. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavejength guides on page 33 



WASHINGTON 
KHQ O-O-N-O 

KOMO A-A-N-A 
KOL 1-0-3-3 



OREGON 
KGW A-A-N-A 



COLORADO 
KOA A-A-N-A 
WDRC 1-0-3-3 

UTAH 
KSL o-o-N-o 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO A-A-N-A 
KFRC 1-0-0-0 
KECA A-A-A-A 
KFI o-o-N-o 
KFSD A-A-N-A 



ARIZONA 

KTAR A-A-N-A 



MINNESOTA 



WDAY o-o-N-o 
KFYR o-o-N-o 



niCH.t ONTARIO QUEBEC 

^ CKGW L MOO CFCF L A N-A 
\j;FRB 1-0-3 3 



WNAX 0-0-3-3 



/ NEW 

WBEN A-A-A-A 
WGR 1-0-3-3 
WKBW o-2-o-o 
WHAM L-o-0-0 




me; 

WCSH A A A A 



V8Z L No 
WORC 1-0-3 3 
VEAN o-2-oo 
COnn^wJAR A-A-W-A 
/WDRC 1-0-3-3 
WABC 1 2-3 3 
WEAF A AAA 
WJZ L-M-N-P 
WFBL 0-2-3-3 




WMAL 1-0-0-0 
WRC L-o-N-o 

WBAL' L-M-N-o 

WCAO 1-2-3-3 



WFLA L-o-N-o 
W1AX L-o-N-o 
WIOD L-o-N-o 
WDBO 0-0-3-3 
WDAE 0-0-3-3 



FRIDAY 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

6:00— Uncle Don, WOR. 

6:00— Air Juniors, WENR. 

6:00 — Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 

6:15 — Dinner Timers (dance), WBEN. 

7:00 — Uncle Zim and Bamby (children), 

WIOD. 
7:00 — Couple Next Door (sketch), KYW. 
7:00 — Miko and Herman (comic), WBBM. 
7:05— Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 
7:15 — Stringed Choir (classical), KDKA. 
7:15 — Prudence Musical Hits, WBZ. 
7:30 — Bond'Beau Brummcls (novelty music), 
WBEN. 
Harold Teen (comic), WGN. 
— Gene and Glenn, WTAM. 

■Adam and Eve (comic), WXYZ. 
Deacon's Dicta, WCCO. 
Frank and Ernest (comic), KWK. 
-Uncle Walt and Skeezix (comic), 

WGN. 
-Penn Drake Review (song hits), 
KDKA. 



8:30 



8:30— WORC Minstrels, WORC. 

9:00 — Macdonald British Consoliers, CFRB. 

9:00— Night Club, WSM. 

9:00 — Charlie Hamp (piano), WBBM. 

9:00 — Little Symphony, WOR. 

9:00— Canada on Parade, CKGW, CKAC. 

9:30— Chris Vanture and His Gang, WTAR. 

9:30— The Hoosier Editor, WLW. 
10:00 — Heatrolatown (variety), WLW. 
10:00 — German Band, WISJ. 
10:30— Musical Round-up, WCFL. 
10:30 — Hav-a-Tampa (popular), WFLA. 
10:45 — McGuerny and Lundberg (comic), 

WCCO. 
1 I :00— Canadian Pacific Concert, CKGW. 
1 1 :00— Sports and News, KYW. 
1 1 :00 — Palais Royal Dance Orchestra, WBEN. 
11:00 — Canada on Parade, WJR. 
11:15 — Jimmy Wilson's Catfish Band, KVOO. 
11:15 — Apex Travelers (dance), KDKA. 
11:20 — Herr Louie and the Weasel, WGN. 
11:30 — Masters Minstrel Boys, WTAR. 
11:30— Dan and Sylvia, WMAQ. 
1 1 :45— Sport Slices, WLW. 
12:00— Jack Turner, WHAS. 
12:00 — Dance Music, WMAQ. 
12:00 — Dance Music, WGN. 



12:00 — Club Sohio (variety), WLW. 

12:00 — Witching Hour (semi-classic) , WKRC. 

12:00— Bert Lown's Orchestra, KFH, WNAC, 

WABC, WCAU, WEAN, KTSA, 

WTAR. 
12:00— Phil Spitalny Orchestra, WRC, KYW, 

WEAF, WGY, WMC, KPRC. 
12:00 — Florence Richardson Orchestra (Hotel 

Paramount, New York), KOA, 

WENR, WREN, WJZ, WGAR. 
12:15 — Popular Orchestras, WBBM. 
12:15 — Gebhardt's Mexican Players, WOAI. 
12:15— Village Rhymester, KWK. 
12:15— Old Wagon-tongue (drama), KOA. 
12:30— Detective Story, KFWB. 
12:3 0— Nocturne, KFH, WNAC, WABC, 

WCAU, WEAN, KTSA, WTAR. 
12:30— Wayne King Orchestra, KTHS, WRC, 

WENR, KSD, WEAF, WTAM, 

WMC, WSM, KPRC. 
12:30— Henry Tobias Orchestra, WREN, 

KWK, WJZ, WGAR. 
1:00— Nighthawk Frolic, WDAF. 
1:00 — Slumber Boat (orchestra), KWK. 
2:00 — Midnight Merry-makers (requests), 

KWK. 
2:00— Dance Music, KFWB. 



NBC— RED 

8:00 (E. D. in East, C. D. in West)— Gene 
and Glenn. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell's Orchestra. 

9:45 — A. & P. 
10:30 — Betty Crocker. 
11:1 5 — Radio Household Institute. 

4:3 P. M. — Rodeheavcr Sing. 
NBC— BLUE 

7:45 a. M. — Jolly Bill and Jane. 
10:00 — Libby McNeil and Libby. 
10:45 — Josephine Gibson. 
12:30 p. M. — National Farm and Home. 

2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 

3:00 — Edna Wallace Hopper. 

3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 

4:00 — Radio Guild. 

CBS 

8:00 A. .M. — Morning Devotions. 

8:45— Old Dutch Girl. 

9:00 — Something for Every One. 
10:00 — Radio Home-Makers. 
10:15 — Frank Crumit and Julia Sanderson. 

2:30 — American School of the Air. 

3 to 5 — Music. 



May, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 29 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ A-A-A-A 
KOMO A-A-A-A 



OREGON 



COLORADO 
KOA A-A-A-A 

UTAH 
KSL A-A-A-A 



KGO A-A-A-A 
KECA A-A-A-A 



5 DAKOTA 



NEBRASKA 
WOW A-A-A-A 



KANSAS 




IJWLBZ l-o-o-o 



|VERMONT\ 

ll'WCSH A-A-A-A 

WBZ L-L-o-P 

'N.H. WEEI A-A-A-A 

-WNAC 1-3-4-4 

fMASS. WORC l-o-o-o 

--WTAG A-A A-A 

[con«./"^ wean ,.3.4.4 

, WJAR A-A-A-A 
A/TIC A A-A-A 
SWDRC 1-3-4-4 
AlABC 1-3 4-4 
WEAF A-A-A-A 
' N - J ,WJZ L L MP 
. ^ JWFBL 2-3-4-4 
_5WPG 1-3-0-0 
iWMAL 1-3-4-4 
I WRC A-A-A-A 
WBAL 0-0-M-o 
WCAO 1-3-44 



mciay 
% I, 8, 15, U, 29 



FRIDAY, MAY 1-8-15-22-29 



,WFLA o-o-o-P 
WJAX o-o-o-P 
WIOD 0:0-o-P 

WQAM l-o-o-o 
,WOBO l-o-o-o 

WDAE 1-0-0-0 



8 Eastern 
Eastern 



East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Cities Service Concert Orchestra: Jessica Drago- 
nette, soprano; the Cavaliers male quartet. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Nestles' Program: Guest artists with orchestra. 
M — Breyer Leaf Boys: Musical program. 
N — Pollock and Lawnhurst: Piano duo. 
P — Natural Bridge Dancing Lesson: Arthur Murray. 

CBS 
1 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 
2 — Lowell Thomas. 
3 — Barbosol Program. 
4 — Dutch Masters. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



9 Eastern 
Daylight 



8 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



7 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — The Clicquot Club. 
B — To Be Announced. 
C — Webster Program: Weber and Fields. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Interwoven Pair: Billy Jones and Ernie Hare. 
M — Armour Program: Male quartet; soloists; orchestra. 

CBS 
1 — True Story Hour. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



KHQ L-L-M-M 
KOMO L-L-M-M 




IwC^H A-A-o-C 
WBZ L-L-M-M 
V, H WEEI A-A-o-C 
WNAC 1-1-1-1 
TAG A-A-o-C 
. .WEAN 1-1-1-1 
£owiH' ; WJAR A-A-o-C 
WTIC A-A-o-C 
DRC 1-1-1-1 
..ABC 1-1-1-1 
WEAF A-A-o-C 
'WJZ L-L-M-M 
" 1BEN A-A-o-C 



KGO L-L-M-M 
KFI L-L-o-o 
KFSD L-L-0-0 



ARIZONA 
KTAR L-L-0-0 



FLORIDA "'" 



QUEBEC / 

CFCF 0-0-0-N f" 

-WBEN A-A-B-B 
WKBW 1-1-2-2 
WHAM L-L-M-N 
WGY A-A-B-B 





ciH 



WFLA o-B-B 
•WfttX o-o-B-B 
WIOO o-o-B-o 



me 1 

WCSH A-A B I 

WBZ L-L-M-0 

N.H.WEEI o-o-B-B 

■WNAC 1-1-2-2 

mass. WJAG A ABB 

-— \^>WEAN 1-1-2-2 

CONN Ciw)AR A-A-B-B 

WTIC o-o-B-B 

\TWDRC 1-1-2-2 

c WABC 1-1-2-2 

WEAF A-A-B-B 

,..JZ L-L-M-N 

NJ /WFBL 1-1-2-2 



WMAL 1-1-2-2 
<WRC A-A-B-B 

WB'AL L-L-M-N 

WCAO 11-2-2 



10 



Eastern Q East. Standard 
Daylight S Cent. Daylight 



8 Cent. Standard 
Mt, Day light 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Kodak Week-end Program: Countess Olga Albani. 
B — RKO Theatre of the Air. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Armstrong Quakers. 
M — Clara, Lu and Em: Humorous sketch. 
N — Cub and Scoop: Skit. 

CBS 

1 — Van Heusen Program: Lee Morris, double-voiced 
singer; orchesl ra. 

2 — The March of Time: Dramatized news events (see 

page 7). 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



11 Eastern ■! f\ East. Standard Q Cent. Standard 
1 Daylight 1 U Cent. Daylight 7 Mt. Daylighl 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — Vincent Lopez. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Slumber Music. 
M — Amos 'n' Andy. 

N — Otto Gray and His Oklahoma Cowboys. 
P— Mildred Hunt: Contralto. 

CBS 

1 — Fletcher Henderson Orchestra. 

2 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 

3 — Ben Bernie and Orchestra. 

o — Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



WA5HINGION 

KHQ Mo 00 
KOMO Mo 00 
KOL 1 2-0-0 
KFPY o2oo 




■WNAC 1 on 
ma^WORC , , 33 

c"o^/ R J> EAN ° ' °° 
WflffC 11 3 3 

\."WABC 1-1 3 3 

Jrt/EAF A A A A 

WJZ L-L-NP 

IPG 03 3 



ID 

A WRC L-LNP 
.VBAL' L-L-NP 
WCAO 1-0 3 3 



Page 3u 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



May, 193 1 



SATURDAY, MAY 2-9-16-23-30 



5 Eastern 
Daylight 



4 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — The Lady Next Door: Children's program. 

B — Tea Timers. 

C — Rex Cole Mountaineers. 

NBC (Blue) 

L — Peter var Steeden Orchestra. 
M — Jolly Junketeers: Children's program. 
N — Little Orphan Annie: Dramatic skit. 
P — Junior Detectives: Children's program. 

CBS 

1 — Leon Belasco Orchestra. 

2 — Mr. and Mrs. F. C. H.: Script act. 

3 — Leon Belasco. 

4 — Tony's Scrap-book. 

— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 




N.H.1 

_..BZ o-o-N-o 
■massTwTAG o-o-B-o 

icONk|"y/MR A-A-B-o 

WTiC A-A-B-o 
fDRC 1-1-3-4 

JABC 1-1-2-4 
WEAF A-A-B-C 
N.0 WJZJ.-M-N-P 
/WFBL 1-1-3-0 
,WPG_1-1-3-4 
,WMAL 1-1-3-0 
_ jWRC o-o-B-o 
WBALJ 0-0-N-o 



Saturday 
I%y 2,9. 16. £5. 30 



ARIZONA 



. A-o-o-o 
WDRC o-o-2-o 
'ABC 1-1-2-3 
WEAF A-B-B-o 
WJZ L-N-P-R 
NJ-WFBL 1-1-2-0 




6 Eastern 
Daylight 



5 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



4 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



iota \j 
AwMAL o-o-2-o 
*J )WRC A-o-P-o 
>WBAL\M-o-P-R 
WCAOM-l-o-3 



WFLA o-o-o-R 

WJAX o-o-o-R 

100 o-B-B-R 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — High Road of Adventure: Gilbert Gable. 
B — Black and Gold Room Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Raising Junior: Domestic skit. 
M — Walter Mills: Baritone. 

N — Gruen Program: Tom Neely's saxophone quartet. 
P — Smith Ballew's Orchestra. 
R — Lowell Thomas. 

CBS 
1 — Ted Husing's Sportslants. 
2 — Dance Music. 

3 — Eno Crime Club: Mystery serial. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



7 Eastern 
Daylight 



6 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



5 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



WASHINGTON 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — Gene Austin: Crooner. 

B — Laws that Safeguard Society. 

C — Club Valspar: Ted Lewis and his musical clowns. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Amos 'n' Andy. 
M — Tastyeast Jesters: Comedy dialog. 
N — Rise of the Goldbergs: Humorous sketch. 
P — Pickard Family: Southern folk songs. 

CBS 
1 — Morton Downey. 
2 — Golden Blossom Honey Orchestra. 
3 — Armand Vecsey Orchestra. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 




WCSH o-B-c c 
, WBZ L-M-o-o 
NH WEEI o-B-o-o 
WNAC 1-3-3-3 
mass'WORC 1-3-3 3 
5 \WTAG A-B-C-C 
conk/ r, vWEAN 0-3-3-3 
WWJAR o-B-C-C 
(WTIC o-B-C-C 
DRC 1-3-3-3 
..ABC 1-23-3 
[WEAF A-B-C-C 
.JJZ L-M-N-P 
WGY o-B-C-C 
WFBL 1-3-3-3 
MAL 1-3-0-0 
L-M-o-o 
WBAll L-NI-O-0 
WCAO 1-3-3-3 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO A-B-N-P 
KFRC 1-3-3-3 
KECA o-B-o-o 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-B-o-o 



WFLA L^M-CC 
WJAX L-M-C-C 
WIOD L-M-C-C 
WDBO 3-3-3 
WOAE 0-3-3-3. 



SATURDAY LOCAL PROGRAMS 

E. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

5:15— Traffic (drama), KDKA. 

6:00 — Scckatary Hawkins, WLW. 

(5:00 — Westinghouse Band, KDKA. 

6:00— Air Juniors, WENR. 

6:00 — Topsy Turvy Time, WMAQ. 

6:30 — Elementary Spanish, WMAQ. 

6:30— Kaempfer Bird Program, WENR. 

6:30— Uncle Bob (children), KYW. 

7:00 — Mike and Herman (comic), WBBM. 

7:00 — Orange Grove String Band, WRUF. 

7:00 — Punch and Judy Show, WGN. 

7:00 — Crosley Theater of Air, WLW. 

7:30— In Gottschalkville (drama), WCAU. 

7:30— Gloom-chasers, WKBW. 

7:45 — Tourist Dramatic Club, WFLA. 

7:45— Sports (Hal Totten), WMAQ. 

7:45 — Harold Teen (comic), WGN. 

8:15— Uncle Walt and Skeezix, WGN. 

8:30 — Crosley Saturday Knights, WLW. 

9:00 — Opera House, WTAM. 

9:00 — Around the Melodcon, WBAL. 

9:15— Footlitc Follies, WMAQ. 



9:15— Sports Review, WBBM. 12:00- 

9:30— Classical Music, WCAO. 12:00- 

9:45— The Bon Bons, WOR. 12:00- 
9:45— Jack Turner, WHAS. 

9:45— Musical Minutes, WKRC. 12:00- 
10:00— Ozarkians Orchestra, KWK. 

10:00 — Artists' Recital, WCCO. 12:00- 
10:00 — Gift Barn Dance, KDKA. 

10:00 — Masqueraders, WBAL. 12:15- 

10:00— Keen Komedy Kompany, CKGW. 12:30- 
10:15— Sports Slices, WLW. 

10:30 — Musical Round-up (variety), WCFL. 12:30- 
10:30— Concert, CPRY. 

10:30— Playhouse, WOR. 12:30- 
1 1 :00— Will Oakland's Terrace, WOR. 
1 1 :00 — News, WGN. 

11:00 — Riverside Ramblers, WBZ. 1:00- 

1 1 :00— Palais Royal Dance Orchestra, WBEN. 1 to 
11:00 — Dance Music, WHAM. 

11:00— Grand Ol' Opry, WSM. 1 to 

1 1 :20— Herr Louie and Weasel, WGN. 1 :00- 

11:30 — National Barn Dance (variety), WLS. 1:30- 

11:30 — Corn Huskers (popular), CKGW. 1:30- 

11:30— Dan and Sylvia, WMAQ. 2:00- 

12:00 — Simm's Singers, WFAA. 2:00- 
12:00 — Old Fiddlers Request Program, WRVA. 2:00- 

12:00— Dance Music, WMAQ. 2 to 



-Dance Music, KYW. 

—King Edward Cigar Band, WLW. 

-Bert Lown Orchestra, WNAC, WABC, 

WEAN, KTSA, WTAR. 
-Phil. Spitalny Orchestra, KYW, 

WREN, WJZ, WGAR. 
-Smith Ballew Orchestra, KOA, WTIC, 

WRC, WSB, WBEN, WMC, KPRC. 
— Bcrnie, Gendron, Whiteman, WBBM. 
—Louis Panico's Orchestra, WREN, 

KWK, WJZ, WGAR. 
-Nocturne, WNAC, WABC, WEAN, 

KTSA, WTAR. 
—Ben Cutler's Orchestra (from Villa 

Valle), KOA, WTIC, WRC, WSB, 

KSD, WTAM, WMC, KPRC. 
-Ambassadors, WOW. 
3 — Knights and Ladies of the Bath, 

WGN. 
3— Nighthawk Frolic, WDAF. 
-Belle of Old Kentucky, WHAS. 
-The Doodlesockers, WLW. 
-RKO St. Louis Theater, KWK. 
-DX Club (until 6 a. m.), WISJ. 
—Dance Orchestra, KOA. 
—Midnight Merry-makers, KWK. 
4— Dance Music, KFWB. 



NBC— RED 

8:00 (E. D. in East, C. D. in West) — Gene 
and Glenn. 

8:30 — Cheerio. 

9:15 — Campbell's Orchestra. 

9:45— A. & P. 
11:15 — Radio Household Institute. 
11:30 — Keys to Happiness. 

NBC— BLUE 

7:45 A. M. (E. D. in East, C. D. in West) — 

Jolly Bill and Jane. 
12:30 — National Farm and Home. 
1:30 — Keystone Chronicles. 
2:15 — Organ (Irma Glen). 
2:45 — Sisters of the Skillet. 
3:30 — Chicago Serenade. 
4:15 — Pacific Feature Hour. 



CBS 

00 a. M. — Morning Devotions. 
30 — Tony's Scrap-book. 
45— Old Dutch Girl. 
00 — Something for Every One. 
Noon to 5 — Music. 



May, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Pas 



KHQ o-B-N-N 
KOMO o-B-N-N 



OREGON 
KGW O-B-N-N 

COLORADO 
KLZ 0-0-0-5 

UTAH 
KSL o-B-0-0 



CALIFORNIA 
KGO o-N-N 
KFRC 0-3-o5 
KECA o-B-N-N 



ARIZONA 
KTAR o-B-0-0 



5 DAKOTA 

WNAX 0-3-0-5 



KFAB O-N-N 
WOW o-B-C-C 




TEXAS \ KFJF 2-: 
WKY 



fcWLBZ l-o-o-o 

rWCSH o-B-C-C 

WBZ o-o-N-N 

'NH-WEEI o-B-0-0 

-WNAC 1-3-4-0 

Tmass. WORC 1-3-0-0 

VTAG o-B-o-o 

^WEAN l-o-o-o 

wjar a-b-c-c 
Stic o-bc-c 

VDRC 1-3-0-5 
VABC 1-3-4-5 
WEAF o-B-C-C 
'n.jwjz o-M-N-N 
WGY o-B-C-C 
•IWFBL 2-3-0-5 
WPG 130 
I WMAL l-3-o-o 
(WRC o-B-0-0 
WBAL o-o-N-o 
L WCAO 0-3-0-5 

r^ay 2, 9, 16, 23, 30 



SATURDAY, MAY 2-9-16-23-30 



WFUA o-B-0-0 
W1AX o-B-0-0 
WIOD 
WQAM l-o-o-o 
WOBO 1 0-0-0 
WDAE 1 0-0-0 



8 Eastern 
Daylight 



7 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



6 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

B — Radiotron Varieties: Vocal soloists and orchestra. 
C — The Silver Flute. 

NBC (Blue) 
M — Pianist. 
N — Fuller Man: Vocalists; orchestra. 

CBS 
1 — Pryor's Cremo Band: Martial band music. 
2 — Lowell Thomas. 

3 — Ben Alley: With Ann Leaf at the organ. 
4 — Wallace Silversmiths. 

5 — Mary Charles: With Freddie Rich's orchestra. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33* 



9 Eastern 
Daylight 



8 East. Standard 
Cent. Daylight 



7 Cent. Standard 
Mt. Daylight 



Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 

A — General Electric Hour: Symphony orchestra; Floyd 
Gibbons. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Royale Dansante Orchestra. 
M — Domino Sugar Program. 

CBS 
1 — Atlantic City Entertains. 
2 — National Radio Forum. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



/ NEW 

r-WoRK 

.WBEN AAA A 

WKBW 1-1-2-2 

WHAM 0-0-M-M 

WGY A AAA 

PENNSYLVANIA 

KOKA 0-0-M-M 

WJAS l 1-0-0 

WLBW 11-22 

WHP 11-22 

WFAN 11-22 

WF1 A AAA 




WCSH A AAA 
WBZ 0-0-M-M 
WEEI A-A-A-A 
WNAC 0-0-2-2 
WORC 1-1-2 2 
„WTAG A-A-A-A 
few.)*' WEAN 0-0-2-2 
WJAR A-A-A-A 
TIC A A-A-A 
WDRC 1-1-0-0 
WABC 1-1-22 
WEAF A AAA 
N.J.WJZ 0-0-M-M 
IWFBL 1-1-0-0 
PG 1-1-0-0 
WMAL 0-0-2-2 
, , WRC A-A-A-A 
WBAl^ 0-0-M-M 




CALIFORNIA 

KGO A-A-A-A 
KFRC 1122 
KFI A-A-A-A 
KFSD A-A-A-A 



ARIZONA 
KTAR A-A-A-A 



WJAX A-A A A 



WASHINGTON 

KHQ A A A A 
KOMO A A A A 
KOL 1 1 1 1 

OREGON 
KGW A A A A 



COLORADO 
KOA A A A A 
KLZ 1 1 1 ' 

UTAH 
KDYL 1M1 
KSL A A A A 



CALIFORNIA 

KGO A A A A 
KFRC 1111 
KFI A A A A 
KFSO A A A A 



ARIZONA 

KTAR A A A A 



WOAY A A A A 
KFYR A A A A 



5 DAKOTA 

WNAX 1111 



WOW A A A A 




/MICK 



WCCO 11 1 J 
KSTP AAA A 



IOWA 

KOIL 1 1 1 1 
KSC1 I'll 
WHO A A A A 
WMT 1 1 1 1 



V ONTARIO QUEBEC / 

CKGW L-L-OOCFCF L-L-o-N f^ 
CFRB t-M' 1 ,-WBEN 



NEW 
YORK 



PENNSYLVANIA 

KOKA L-L-M-N 
WCAE AAA A 
WiAS 11-1-1 
WLBW 1-1-1-1 
WHP 1-1-1-1 
WFAN 1-1-1-1 
WFI A A-A A_ 

MARYLAND 



KMBC 1111 
WDAF A A A A 
KMOX 1111 
KSO A A A A 
KWK LL Mo 



ARKANSAS 



KLRA 1 1 ' 



WDSU 111' 
WSMB A A A A 




WFLA A A A A 
W1AX A A A A 
WIOO A A A A 



IME.J 

\WCSH A-A-A-A 
WBZ L-L-M-0 
NH-WEEI A-A-A-A 
.WNAC 1-1-1-1 
mass. WORC 1-1-1-1 
-vJ/VTAG A-A-A-A 
/ RI WEAN 1-1-1-1 
, WJAR A-A-A-A 
WTIC A-A-A-A 
-WDRC 1-1-1-1 
WABC 1-1-11 
WEAF AAA A 
N-J/WJZ L-L-M-N 
" )WGY A-A-A-A 

pg mm 

WMAL 111-1 

WRC A-A-A A 
WBAL M N 
WCAO 111 1 




■I f\ Eastern Q East. Standard Q Cent. Standard 

1U Daylight 7 Cent. Daylight O Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 

NBC (Red) 
A — B. A. Rolfe and His Lucky Strike Dance Orchestra. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Cuckoo. 

M — Clara, Lu and Em. 
N — Memory Lane: Old poetry favorites. 

CBS 
1 — Hank Simmons' Showboat: Melodrama. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



11 Eastern -i r\ East. Standard ft Cent. Standard 
1 Daylight 1U Cent. Daylight 7 Mt. Daylight 

Chain programs by 15-minute periods 
NBC (Red) 

A — Troubadour of the Moon: Lanny Ross, tenor, with 
string trio, 

B— Harry Busse and His Orchestra. 
C— Little Jack Little. 

NBC (Blue) 
L — Slumber Music. 
M — Amos 'n' Andy. 
N— Sisters of the Skillet. 
P— Phil Spitalny Orchestra. 

CBS 

1 — Jack Denny Orchestra: Prom Montreal. 
2 — Pryor's Crcnio Band. 

3— Guy Lombardo and His Royal Canadians. 
— Local Programs. 

State and wavelength guides on page 33 



MICM c. ONTARIO QUEBEC / NEW IVCRMOM 

•CKGW 00N0CFCF A Boo r^ORn 
CFRB 03 3 ^WKBW 12 3 3' 

WHAM LL N P 
WHEC 1233 
WGY ABB 

PENNSYLVANIA 

WCAE A n n C 
WIAS 12oo 
WLBW 12 33 
WHP 1 o 3 3 
WCAU 1 n n n 
WFI A B BC 

' 1 MARYLAND 




NM | 

_ WNAC o 1 33 

ma»3 WORC 1133 

EAN 1 o 3 3 



.WTIC A B B C 
JVORC 1133 
..ABC 1133 
WtAF A B BC 
■ N ,WJZ I I NP 
(WFBL "2 on 
*W.PG 1 " 3 3 
WMAL on 3 3 
, , WRC o o B o 
WBAL L L N P 
WCAO 1 ooo 



WFLA 0-0 ' 

winn l-o-o-o 



Page 32 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



Maj', 1931 



North American Broadcasting Stations 

Stations by Call Letters Revised to April 1, 1931 

(Figures in Parentheses Denote Power Now Used) 



KBGZ 

KBHB 

KBPS 

KBTM 

KCRC 

KCRJ 

KDB 

KDFN 

KDKA 

KDLR 

KDYL 

KECA 

KELW 

KEX 

KFAB 

KFBB 

KFBK 

KFBL 

KFDM 

KFDY 

KFEL 

KFEQ 

KFGQ 

KFH 

KFI 

KFIO 

KFIU 

KFIZ 

KFJB 

KFJF 

KFJI 

RFJM 

KFJB 

KFJY 

KFJZ 

KFKA 

KFKB 

KFKU 

KFLV 

KFLX 

KFMX 

KFNF 

KFOR 

KFOX 

KFPL 

KFPM 

KFPW 

KFPY 

KFQD 

KFQU 

KFQW 

KFRC 

KFRTJ 

KFSD 

KFSG 

KFUL 

KFUM 

KFUO 

KFUP 

KFVD 

KFVS 

KFWB 

KFWF 

KFWI 

KFXD 

KFXF 

KFXJ 

KFXM 

KFXR 

KFXY 

KFYO 

KFYR 

KGA 

KGAR 

KGB 

KGBU 

KGBX 

KGBZ 

KGCA 

KGCR 

KGCTJ 

KGCX 

KGDA 

KGDE 

KGDM 

KGDY 

KGEF 

KGEK 

KGER 

KGEW 

KGEZ 

KGFF 

KGFG 

KGFI 

KGFJ 

KGFK 

KGFL 

KGFW 

KGFX 

KGGC 

KGGF 

KGGM 

KGHF 

KGHI 

KGHL 

KGIR 

KGIW 

KGIX 

KGIZ 

KGJF 

KGKB 

KGKL 

KGKO 

KGKX 

KGKY 

KGMB 

KGMP 

KGNF 

KGNO 

KGO 

KGRS 

KGU 

KGVO 

KGW 

KGY 

KHJ 

KHQ 

KICK 

KID 

KIDO 

KIT 

KJBS 



York, Neb. (500) 930 KJR 

Kcnnett, Mo. (250) 1230 KLCN 

Portland. Ore. (100) 1420 KLO 

Paragould, Ark. (100) 1200 KLPM 

Enid, Okla. (100) 1370 KLRA 

Jerome, Ariz. (100) 1310 KLS 

Santa Barbara, Calif. (100)1500 KLX 

Casper, Wyo. (100) 1210 KLZ 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (50000) 980 KMA 

Devil's Lake, N. D. (100). .1210 KMAC 

Salt Lake Citv, Utah (1000)1290 KMBC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1430 KMCS 

Burbank, Calif. (500) 780 KMED 

Portland, Ore. (5000) 118'0 KMJ 

Lincoln, Neb. (5000) 770 KMLB 

Great Falls, Mont. ( 1000) ...1280 KMMJ 

Sacramento, Calif. (100) 1310 KMO 

Everett, Wash. (50) 1370 KMOX 

Beaumont, Tex. (500) 560 KMPC 

Brookings, S. D. (500) 550 KMTR 

Denver, Col. (500) 920 KNX 

St. Joseph, Mo. (2500) 680 KOA 

Boone, la. (100) 1310 KOAC 

Wichita, Kan. (1000) 1300 KOB 

Los Angeles, Calif. (5000).. 640 KOCW 

Spokane, Wash. (100) 1120 KOH 

Juneau, Alaska (10) 1310 KOIL 

Fond du Lac, Wis. (100) ...1420 KOIN 

Marshalltown, la. (250) 1200 KOL 

Oklahoma City, Okla. (5000)1480 KOMO 

Astoria, Ore. (100) 1370 KONO 

Grand Forks, N. D. (100)... .1370 KOOS 

Portland, Ore. (500) _...1300 KORE 

Fort Dodge, la. (100) 1310 KOY 

Fort Worth, Tex. (100) 1370 KPCB 

Greeley, Col. (500) 880 KPJM 

Milford, Kan. (5000) 1050 KPO 

Lawrence, Kan. (500) 1220 KPOF 

Rockford, 111. (500) 1410 KPPC 

Galveston, Tex. (100) 1370 KPQ 

Northfield, Minn. (1000) 1250 KPRC 

Shenandoah, la. (500) 890 KPSN 

Lincoln, Neb. (100) 1210 KQV 

Long Beach, Calif. (1000). .1250 KQW 

Dublin, Tex. (100) 1310 KRE 

Greenville, Tex. (15) 1310 KREG 

Ft. Smith, Ark. (50) 1340 KRGV 

Spokane, Wash. (1000) 1340 KRLD 

Anchorage, Alaska (100)... .1230 KRMD 

Holy Citv, Calif. (100) 1420 KROW 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 1420 KRSC 

San Francisco, Calif. (1000) 610 KSAC 

Columbia Mo. (1000) 630 KSCJ 

San Diego, Calif. (500) 600 KSD 

Los Angeles. Calif. (500)....1120 KSEI 

Galveston, Tex. (500) 1290 KSL 

Colorado Sp'gs, Col. (1000)1270 KSMR 

Clavton, Mo. (500) 550 KSO 

Denver, Col. (100) 1310 KSOO 

Culver City, Calif. (250).... 1000 KSTP 

Cape Girardeau, Mo. (100). .1210 KTAB 

Hollvwood, Calif. (1000).... 950 KTAP 

St. Louis, Mo. (100) .1200 KTAR 

San Francisco, Calif. (500) 930 KTAT 

Nampa, Ida. (50) 1420 KTBI 

Denver, Col. (500) 920 KTBR 

Edgewater, Col. (50) 1310 KTBS 

S. Bernardino, Calif. (100)1210 KTFI 

Oklahoma City, Okla. (100)1310 KTHS 

Flagstaff, Ariz. (100) 1420 KTLC 

Abilene, Tex. (100) 1420 KTM 

Bismarck, N. D. (1000) 550 KTNT 

Spokane, Wash. (5000) 1470 KTRH 

Tucson, Ariz. (100) 1370 KTSA 

San Diego, Calif. (250) 1330 KTSL 

Ketchikan, Alaska (500)-.. 900 KTSM 

St. Joseph, Mo. (100) 1310 KTW 

York, Neb. (500) 930 KTJJ 

Decorah, la. (50) 1270 KUOA 

Watertown, S. D. (100) 1210 KUSD 

Mandan, N. D. (100) 1200 KTJT 

Wolf Point, Mont. (100)....1310 KVI 

Mitchell, S. D. (100) 1370 KVL 

Fergus Falls, Minn. (100).... 1200 KVOA 

Stockton, Calif. (250) 1100 KVOO 

Huron, S. D. (100) 1200 KVOS 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1300 KWCR 

Yuma, Col. (50) 1200 KWEA 

Long Beach, Calif. (1000)....1360 KWG 

Fort Morgan, Col. (100) 1200 KWJJ 

Kalispell, Mont. (100) 1310 KWK 

Alva, Okla. (100) 1420 KWKC 

Oklahoma City, Okla. (100)1370 KWKH 

Corpus Cliristi, Tex. (100) .1500 KWLC 

Los Angeles, Calif. (100).. .1200 KWSC 

Moorhead, Minn. (30) 1500 KWWG 

Raton, N. M. (50) 1370 KXA 

Ravenna, Neb. (100) 1310 KXL 

Pierre, S. D. (200) 580 KXO 

San Francisco, Calif. (100). .1420 KXRO 

Coffeyville, Kan. (500) 1010 KXYZ 

Albuquerque, N. M. (250).... 1230 KYA 

Pueblo, Col. (250) 1320 KYW 

Little Rock, Ark. (100) 1200 KZM 

Billings, Mont _ 950 WAAF 

Butte, Mont. (500) 1360 WAAM 

Trinidad, Col. (100) 1420 WAAT 

Las Vegas, Nev. (100) 1420 WAAW 

Grant Citv, Mo. (100) 1500 WABC 

Little Rock, Ark. (250) 890 WABI 

Tvler, Tex. (100) 1500 WABZ 

San Angelo, Tex. (100) 1370 WACO 

Wichita Falls. Tex. (250).... 570 WADC 

Sandpoint, Ida. (100) 1420 WAIU 

Scottsbluff, Neb (100) 1500 WALR 

Honolulu, Hawaii (500) 1320 WAPI 

Elk Citv, Okla. (100) 1210 WASH 

North Platte, Neb. (500)... .1430 WAWZ 

Dodge Citv, Kan. (100) 1210 WBAA 

San Francisco, Calif. (7500) 790 WBAK 

Amarillo, Tex. (1000) 1410 WBAL 

Honolulu, Hawaii (1000).... 940 WBAP 

Missoula, Mont 1420 WBAX 

Portland, Ore. (1000) 620 WBBC 

Lacey, Wash. (10) 1200 WBBM 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000).. 900 WBBR 

Spokane, Wash. (1000) 590 WBBZ 

Red Oak. la. (100) 1420 WBCM 

Idaho Falls, Ida. (250) 1320 WBEN 

Boise, Ida. (1000) 1250 WBEO 

Yakima, Wash. (50) 1310 WBGF 

San Francisco, Calif. (100)1070 WBIG 



Seattle, Wash. (5000) 970 WBIS 

Blytheville, Ark. (50) 1290 WBMS 

Ogden, Utah (500) 1400 WBNX 

Minot, N. D. (100) 1420 WBOW 

Little Rock, Ark. (1000).. .1390 WBRC 

Oakland, Calif. (250) 1440 WBRE 

Oakland, Calif. (500) 880 WBSO 

Denver, Col. (1000) 560 WBT 

Shenandoah, la. (500) _. 930 WBTM 

San Antonio, Tex 1370 WBZ 

Kansas Citv, Mo. (1000).... 950 WBZA 

Inglewood, Calif 1120 WCAC 

Medford, Ore. (100) 1310 WCAD 

Fresno, Calif. (100) 1210 WCAE 

Monroe, La. (50) 1200 WCAH 

Clav Center, Neb. (1000).... 740 WCAJ 

Tacoma, Wash. (500) 860 WCAL 

St. Louis, Mo. (50000) 1090 WCAM 

Beverlv Hills, Calif. (500).. 710 WCAO 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000).. 570 WCAP 

Hollvwood, Calif. (5000)... .1050 WCAT 

Denver, Col. (12500) 830 WCATJ 

Corvallis, Ore. (1000) 550 WCAX 

State College, N. M. (20000)1180 WCAZ 

Chickasha, Okla. (250) 1400 WCBA 

Reno, Nev. (500) 1380 WCBD 

Council Bluffs, la. (1000). ...1260 WCBM 

Portland, Ore. (1000) 940 WCBS 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 1270 WCCO 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 920 WCCP 

San Antonio, Tex. (100) 1370 WCDA 

Marshfield, Ore. (100) 1370 WCFL 

Eugene, Ore. (100) 1420 WCGTJ 

Phoenix, Ariz. (1000) 1390 WCHI 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 650 WCKY 

Prescott, Ariz. (100) 1500 WCLB 

San Francisco, Calif. (5000) 680 WCLO 

Denver, Col. (500) 880 WCLS 

Pasadena, Calif. (50) 1210 WCMA 

Wenatchee, Wash. (50) 150O WCOA 

Houston, Tex. (1000) 920 WCOC 

Pasadena, Calif. (1000) 1360 WCOD 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (500) 1380 WCOH 

San Jose, Calif. (500) 1010 WCRW 

Berkeley, Calif. (100) 1370 WCSC 

Santa. Ana, Calif. (100) 1500 WCSH 

Harlingen, Tex. (500) 1260 WDAE 

Dallas, Tex. (10000) 1040 WDAF 

Shreveport, La. (50) 1310 WDAG 

Oakland, Calif. (500) 930 WDAH 

Seattle, Wash. (50) 1120 WDAY 

Manhattan, Kan. (500) 580 WDBJ 

Sioux City, la. (1000) 1330 WDBO 

St. Louis, Mo. (500) 550 WDEL 

Pocatello, Ida. (250) 900 WDGY 

Salt Lake Citv. Utah (5000)1130 WDIX 

Santa Maria, Calif. (100). ...1200 WDOD 

Clarinda, la. (500) 1380 WDRC 

Sioux Falls, S. D. (2000)... .1110 WDSU 

St. Paul, Minn. (10000) 1460 WDWF 

Oakland, Calif. (1000) 560 WDZ 

San Antonio, Tex. (100).... 1420 WEAF 

Phoenix, Ariz. (500) 620 WEAI 

Ft. Worth, Tex. (1000) 1240 WEAN 

Los Angeles, Calif. (1000). .1300 WEAO 

Portland, Ore. (500) 1300 WEBC 

Shreveport, La. (1000) 1450 WEBQ 

Twin Falls, Ida. (250) 1320 WEBR 

Hot Springs, Ark. (10000). .1040 WEDC 

Houston, Tex. (100) 1310 WEDH 

Los Angeles, Calif. (500).... 780 WEEI 

Muscatine, la. (5000) _.1170 WEHC 

Houston, Tex. (500) 1120 WEHS 

San Antonio, Tex. (1000)....1290 WELK 

Shreveport, La. (100) 1310 WELL 

El Paso, Tex. (100) 1310 WENR 

Seattle, Wash. (1000) 1270 WEPS 

Longview, Wash. (100).... 1370 WEVD 

Fayetteville, Ark. (1000). ...1390 WEW 

Vermilion, S. D. (500) 890 WEXL 

Austin, Tex. (100) 1500 WFAA 

Tacoma, Wash. (1000) 760 WFAN 

Seattle, Wash. (100) 1370 WFBC 

Tucson, Ariz. (500) 1260 WFBE 

Tulsa, Okla, (5000) _ 1140 WFBG 

Bellingham, Wash. (100) ...1200 WFBL 

Cedar Rapids, la. (100) 1310 WFBM 

Shreveport, La. (100) 1210 WFBR 

Stockton, Calif. (100) 1200 WFDF 

Portland, Ore. (500) 1060 WFDV 

St. Louis, Mo. (1000) 1350 WFDW 

Kansas Citv, Mo. (100) 1370 WFI 

Shreveport, La. (10000) 850 WFIW 

Decorah, la. (100) 1270 WFLA 

Pullman, Wash. (500) 1220 WFOX 

Brownsville, Tex. (500) 1260 WGAL 

Seattle, Wash. (500) 570 WGAR 

Portland, Ore. (100) 1420 WGBB 

El Centro, Calif. (100) 1500 WGBC 

Aberdeen, Wash. (100) 1310 WGBF 

Houston, Tex. (100) 1420 WGBI 

San Francisco, Calif. (1000)1230 WGBS 

Chicago, 111. (10000) 1020 WGCM 

Havward, Calif. (100) 1370 WGCP 

Chicago, III. (500) 920 WGES 

Newark, N. J. (1000) 1250 WGH 

Jersey Citv, N. J. (300) 940 WGL 

Omaha, Neb. (500) 660 WGN 

New York, N. Y. (5000) 860 WGR 

Bangor, Me. (100) 1200 WGST 

New Orleans, La. (100) 1200 WGY 

Waco, Tex. (1000) 1240 WHA 

Akron, O. (1000) 1320 WHAD 

Columbus, O. (500) 640 WHAM 

Zanesville, O. (100) 1210 WHAP 

Birmingham, Ala. (5000).... 1140 WHAS 

Grand Rapids, Mich. (500). .1270 WHAT 

New York Citv 1350 WHAZ 

Lafavette, Ind. (500) 1400 WHB 

Harrisburg, Pa. (500) 1430 WHBC 

Baltimore, Md. (10000) 1060 WHBD 

Ft. Worth, Tex. (50000).... 800 WHBF 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (100) 1210 WHBL 

Brooklvn, N. Y. (500) 1400 WHBQ 

Chicago, 111. (25000) 770 WHBU 

Brooklvn, N. Y. (1000) 1300 WHBY 

Ponca City. Okla. (100) 1200 WHDF 

Bav City, Mich. (500) 1410 WHDH 

Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) 900 WHDI 

Marquette, Mich. (100) 1310 WHDL 

Glenn Falls, N. Y. (50).... 1370 WHEC 

Greensboro, N. C 1440 WHFC 



Boston, Mass. (1000) 1230 

Hackensack, N. J. (250).... 1450 

New York Citv (250) 1350 

Terre Haute, Ind. (100) 1310 

Birmingham, Ala. (500) 930 

Wilkes-Barre, Pa. (100) 1310 

Wellesley Hills, Mass. (250) 920 

Charlotte, N. C. (25000) 1080 

Danville, Va. (100) 1370 

Springfield, Mass. (15000).. 990 

Boston, Mass. (500) 990 

Storrs, Conn. (250) 600 

Caston, N. Y. (500) 1220 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (1000) 1220 

Columbus, O. (500) _.1430 

Lincoln, Neb. (500) 590 

Northfield, Minn. ( 1000)....1250 

Camden, N. J. (500) 1280 

Baltimore, Md. (250) 600 

Asburv Park, N. J. (500)....1280 

Rapid City, S. D. (100) 1200 

Philadelphia, Pa. (10000) ....1170 

Burlington, Vt. (100) 1200 

Carthage, 111. (50) 1070 

Allentown, Pa. (250) 1440 

Zion, 111. (5000) 1080 

Baltimore, Md. (100) 1370 

Springfield, 111. (100) 1210 

Minneapolis, Minn. (7500).. 810 

Newark, N. J. (250) 1250 

New York City (250) 1350 

Chicago, 111. (1500) _ 970 

Brooklvn, N. Y. (500) 1400 

Chicago, 111 _.1490 

Covington, Kv. (5000) 1490 

Long Beach, N. Y. (100) 1500 

Janesville, Wis. (100) 1200 

Joliet, 111. (100) 1310 

Culver, Ind. (500) 1400 

Pensacola, Fla. (500) 1340 

Meridian, Miss. (500) 880 

Harrisburg, Pa. (100) 1200 

Yonkers, N. Y. (100) 1210 

Chicago, 111. (100) 1210 

Charleston, S. C. (500) 1360 

Portland, Me. (1000) 940 

Tampa, Fla. (1000) 1220 

Kansas Citv, Mo. (1000).... 610 

Amarillo, Tex. (1000) 1410 

El Paso. Tex. (100) 1310 

Fargo, N. D. (1000) 940 

Roanoke, Va. (250) 930 

Orlando, Fla. (500) 1120 

Wilmington, Del. (250) 1120 

Minneapolis, Minn. (1000). .1180 

Tupelo, Miss. (100) 1500 

Chattanooga, Tenn. (1000) ..1280 

Hartford, Conn. (500) 1330 

New Orleans', La. (1000) ....1250 

Providence, R. I. (100) 1210 

Tuscola, 111. (100) 1070 

New York Citv (50000) 660 

Ithaca, N. Y. (1000) 1270 

Providence, R. I. (250) 780 

Columbus, O. (750)..._ 570 

Superior, Wis. (1000) 1290 

Harrisburg, 111. (100) 1210 

Buffalo, N. Y. (100) 1310 

Chicago, 111. (100) 1210 

Erie, Pa. (100) 1420 

Boston, Mass. (1000) 590 

Emory, Va. (100) 1200 

Evanston, 111. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100).... 1370 
Battle Creek, Mich. (50).... 1420 

Chicago, 111. (50000) 870 

Worcester, Mass (100) 1200 

New York City (500) 1300 

St. Louis, Mo. (1000) 760 

Royal Oak, Mich. (50) 1310 

Dallas, Tex. (50000) 800 

Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 610 

Knoxville, Tenn. (50) 1200 

Cincinnati, O. (100) 1200 

Altoona, Pa. (100) 1310 

Syracuse, N. Y. (1000) 1360 

Indianapolis, Ind. (1000).... 1230 

Baltimore, Md. (500) 1270 

Flint, Mich. (100) 1310 

Rome, Ga. (100). 1370 

Talladega, Ala. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 560 

Hopkinsville, Kv. (1000).... 940 

Clearwater, Fla. (1000) 620 

Brooklyn, N. Y. (250) 1400 

Lancaster, Pa. (100) 1310 

Cleveland, O. (500) 1450 

Freeport, N. Y. (100) 1210 

Memphis, Tenn. (500) 1430 

Evansville, Ind. (500) 630 

Scranton, Pa. (250) 880 

New York Citv (250) 1180 

Gulfport, Miss. (100) 1210 

Newark, N. J. (250) 1250 

Chicago, 111. (500) 1360 

Newport News, Va. (100).... 1310 

Ft, Wavne, Ind. (100) 1370 

Chicago, 111. (25000) 720 

Buffalo, N. Y. (1000) 550 

Atlanta, Ga. (250) 890 

Schenectadv, N. Y. (50000) 790 

Madison, Wis. (750) 940 

Milwaukee, Wis. (250) 1120 

Rochester, N. Y. (5000) 1150 

New York Citv (1000) 1300 

Louisville, Kv. (10000) 820 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100) 1310 

Trov, N. Y. (500) 1300 

Kansas City, Mo. (500) 860 

Canton. O. (100) 1200 

Mt, Orab, O. (100) 1370 

Roek Island, 111. (100) 1210 

Shebovgan. Wis. (500) 1410 

Memphis. Tenn. (100) 1370 

Anderson, Ind. (100) 1210 

Green Bav. Wis. (100) 1200 

Calumet, Mich. (lpO) 1370 

Boston. Mass. (1000) 830 

Minneapolis, Minn. (500 ) ....1180 
Tupper Lake. N. Y. (10).. ..1420 

Rochester, N. Y. (500) 1430 

Cicero, 111. (100) 1420 



WHIS Bluefield, W. Va. (250) 1410 

WHK Cleveland, O. (1000) 1390 

WHN New York City (250) 1010 

WHO Des Moines, la. (5000) 1000 

WHOM Jersey City, N. J. (500) 1450 

WHP Harrisburg. Pa. (500) 1430 

WIAS Ottumwa, la. (100) 1420 

WIBA Madison, Wis. (500) 1280 

WIBG Elkins Park, Pa. (50) 930 

WIBM Jackson, Mich. (100) 1370 

WIBO Chicago, 111. (1000) _ 560 

WIBR Steubenville, O. (50) 1420 

WIBW Topeka, Kan. (1000) 580 

WIBX Utica, N. Y. (100) _ 1200 

WICC Bridgeport, Conn (500) 600 

WIL St. Louis, Mo. (100) 1200 

WILL Urbana, 111. (250) 890 

WILM Wilmington, Del. (100) 1420 

WIOD Miami Beach, Fla. ( 1000)... .1300 

WIP Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 610 

WIS Columbia, S. C. (500) 1010 

WISJ Madison, Wis. (500) 780 

WISN Milwaukee, Wis. (250) 1120 

WJAC Johnstown, Pa. (100) 1310 

WJAG Norfolk, Neb. (1000) 1060 

WJAK Marion, Ind. (50) 1310 

WJAR Providence, R. I. (250) 890 

WJAS Pittsburgh, Pa. (1000) 1290 

WJAX Jacksonville, Fla. (1000).... 900 

WJAY Cleveland, O. (500) 610 

WJAZ Chicago, 111. (5000) ...„ 1490 

WJBC La Salle, 111. (100) 1200 

WJBI Red Bank, N. J. (100) 1210 

WJBK Detroit, Mich. (50) 1370 

WJBL Decatur. 111. (100) 1200 

WJBO New Orleans, La. (100) 1420 

WJBTJ Lewisburg, Pa. (100) 1210 

WJBW New Orleans, La. (30) 1200 

WJBY Gadsden, Ala. (50) 1210 

WJDX Jackson, Miss. (1000) 1270 

WJJD Mooseheart, 111. (20000) 1130 

WJKS Gary, Ind. (1000) 1360 

WJR Detroit, Mich. (5000) 750 

WJSV Alexandria, Va. (10000) 1460 

WJW Mansfield, O. (100) 1210 

WJZ New York City (30000) 760 

WKAQ San Juan, P. R. (500) 890 

WKAR E. Lansing, Mich. ( 1000) ...1040 

WKAV Laconia, N. H. (100) 1310 

WKBB Joliet. 111. (100) 1310 

WKBC Birmingham, Ala. (100) 1310 

WKBF Indianapolis, Ind. (500) 1400 

WKBH La Crosse, Wis. (1000) 1380 

WKBI Chicago, 111. (100) 1420 

WKBN Youngstown, O. (500) 570 

WKBO Jersey City, N. J. (250) 1450 

WKBQ New York Citv (250) 1350 

WKBS Galesburg, 111. (100) 1310 

WKBV Connersville, Ind. ( 100).. ..1500 

WKBW Buffalo, N. Y. (5000) 1480 

WKBZ Ludington, Mich. (50) 1500 

WKJC Lancaster, Pa. (100)..._ 1200 

WKRC Cincinnati, O. (500) 550 

WKY Oklahoma Citv. Okla. (1000) COO 

WKZO Kalamazoo, Mich. (1000).... 590 

WLAC Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 1470 

WLAP Louisville, Kv. (100) 1200 

WLB St. Paul, Minn. (1000) 1250 

WLBC Muncie, Ind. (50) 1310 

WLBF Kansas Citv, Kan. (100)....1420 

WLBG Petersburg. Va. (100) 1200 

WLBL Stevens Point, Wis. (2000) 900 

WLBW Oil City, Pa. (500) 1260 

WLBX Long Is. City, N. Y. (100). .1500 

WLBZ Bangor, Me. (500) 620 

WLCI Ithaca, N. Y. (50) 1210 

WLEX Medford, Mass. (500) 1410 

WLEY Lexington, Mass. (100) 1370 

WLIT Philadelphia, Pa. (500) 560 

WLOE Boston, Mass. (100) 1500 

WLS Chicago, 111. (5000) 870 

WLSI Providence. R, I. (100) 1210 

WITH Brooklvn, N. Y. (500)..._ 1400 

WLVA Lvnchburg, Va. (100) 1370 

WLW Cincinnati, O. (50000) 700 

WLWL New York Citv (5000) 1100 

WMAC Syracuse. N. Y. (250) 570 

WMAK Buffalo, N. Y. (10001 1040 

WMAL Washington, D. C. (250).... 630 

WMAQ Chicago, 111. (5000)..._ 670 

WMAZ Macon, Ga. (250) 890 

WMBA Newport, R. I. (100) 1500 

WMBC Detroit, Mich. (100) 1420 

WMBD Peoria Heights, 111. (500)....1440 

WMBG Richmond, Va. (100) _...1210 

WMBH Joplin. Mo. (100) 1420 

WMBI Chicago, 111. (5000) 1080 

WMBO Auburn. N. Y. (100) 1310 

WMBQ Brooklvn, N. Y. (100) 1500 

WMBR Tampa. Fla. (100) 1370 

WMC Memphis, Tenn. (500) 780 

WMCA New York Citv. (500) 570 

WMMN Fairmont, W. Va. (250) 890 

WMPC Lapeer, Mich. (100) 1500 

WMRJ Jamaica, N. Y. (100) 1210 

WMSG New York Citv (250) 1350 

WMT Waterloo, la. (500) 600 

WNAC Boston, Mass. (1000) 1230 

WNAD Norman, Okla. (500) 1010 

WNAX Yankton, S. D. (1000) 570 

WNBF Binghamton, N. Y. (100)... .1500 

WNBH New Bedford, Mass. (100). .1310 

WNBO Washington. Pa. (100) 1200 

WNBR Memphis, Tenn. (1000) 1430 

WNBW Carbondale. Pa. (10) 1200 

WNBX Springfield, Vt. (10) 1200 

WNBZ Saranac Lake. N. Y. (50).... 1290 

WNJ Newark. N. J. (250) 1450 

WNOX Knoxville. Tenn. (1000) 560 

WNYC New York Citv (500) 570 

WOAI San Antonio, Tex. (50000). .1190 

WOAX Trenton. N. J. (500) 1280 

WOBT Union Citv, Tenn. (100) 1310 

WOBU Charleston. W. Va. (250).... 580 

WOC Davenport, la. (5000) 1000 

WOCL Jamestown. N. Y. (50) 1210 

WODA Paterson, N. J. (1000) 1250 

WODX Mobile, Ala. (500) 1410 

WOI Ames, la. (5000) 640 

WOKO Albany, N. Y. (500) 1430 

WOL Washington, D. C. (100) 1310 

WOMT Manitowoc. Wis. (100).. 1210 

WOOD Grand Rapids, Mich. (500). .1270 

WOPI Bristol, Tenn. (100) 1500 

WOQ Kansas Citv, Mo. (1000).... 1300 

WOR Newark. N. J. (5000) 710 

WORC Worcester, Mass. (100) 1200 

WOS Jefferson Citv. Mo. (500).... 630 

WOV New York Citv (1000) 1130 

WOW Omaha, Neb. (1000) 590 

WOWO Ft, Wavne, Ind. ( 10000).. ..1160 

WPAD Padueah. Ky. (100) 1420 

WPAP New York City (250) 1010 



May, 193 1 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 33 



N. B. C. 


C. B. S. 


Kyc. Stations Heard 


KSD-KFYR 


WGR-WKRC 


550 -<■ 


WFI-VVISO 
WLIT 


KLZ-WQAM 


560 -<■ 




WKBN-WNAX 
WWNC 


570 ■<■ 


WTAG 


WIBW 


580 ■<■ 


WEEI-WOW 
KHQ 




590 -<■ 


KFSD 


WCAO-WMT 
WREC 


600 -<■ 


WDAF 

WFLA-WTMJ 
KGW-KTAR 


WFAN-KFRC 


610 ■<? 


WLBZ 


620 <■ 




WMAL 


630 <■ 


KFI 


WAIU 


640^- 


WSM 




650 ** 


WEAF 




660 <• 




WMAQ 


670 ■<■ 


KPO-WPTF 




680 ■<• 


CKGW 




690** 


WLW 




700 <• 


WGN 




720 <■ 




CKAC 


730 -<■ 


WSB 




740 <• 


WJR 




750 ■<? 


WJZ 


KVI 


760 -<■ 


KFAB 


WBBM 


770 <• 


WMC 


WEAN-WTAR 


780 <r 


WGY-KGO 




790 ■<• 


WFAA-WBAP 




800 •<■ 




WCCO 


810 <■ 


WHAS 




820 ■<;■ 


KOA 




830 -* 




WABC 


860 <• 


WENR-WLS 




870** 


WJAR 


WGST 


890 -<■ 


WBEN-WJAX 

WK V 


KHJ 


900 <• 


KPflC-KOMO 
WWJ 




920 *<• 




WBRC-WDBJ 


930 <• 


WCSH-WDAY 


KOIN 


940 ■<• 


WRC 


KMBC 


950 <• 




CFRB 


960 <■ 


WCFL 




970 -* 


KDKA 




980 ■<■ 


WBZ 




990 -* 


WHO-WOC 




1000 ■<■ 


KYW 




1020 ■<• 


CFCF 




1030 -* 


KTHS 


KRLD 


1040 -<■ 


WBAL-WTIC 




1060 -* 


WTAM 




1070 «* 




WBT 


1080 ■<■ 




KMOX 


1090 -<■ 




WPG 


1100 <■ 


WRVA 




1110 -<• 




KTRH-WDBO 
WISH 


1120 «•> 


KSL 


WJJD 


1130 <■ 


KVOO-WAPI 




1140 <■ 


WHAM 




1150 -*■ 




wowo 


1160 -«* 




WCAU 


1170 -* 


WOAI 




1190 •<• 




WORC 


1200 -<• 


WCAE-WREN 


WDAE 


1220 <• 




WFBM-WNAC 


1230 <- 




WXYZ-WACO 


1240 ■<■ 




WDSU 


1250 -«<• 




KO.^WLBW ! 1260<< . 


WJDX 


KOL 


1270 -«• 




WDOD-WRR 


1280 <• 


WEBC 


KDYL-KTSA 
WJAS 


1290 -**■ 


WIOD (KFH 


1300 ■<■ 


WSMB 


WADC 


1320 -<■ 


WSAI 


KSCJ-WTAQ 


1330 <<• 




WSPD-KFPY 


1340 ■<• 


KWK 




1350 <■ 




WFBL 


1360 <? 




KLRA-WHK 1 1 390 -«■ 




WBCM 1 1410 <• 


KECA 


WCAH-WHP |1430<* 




WHEC-W0K0 1 1440 <+ 


WGAR 


!1450 •* 


KSTP 


1460 ■*■ 




WLAC |1470^- 




KFJF-WKBW I 1480 <■ 


WCKY 


1490 ■*■ 



WPAW 

WPCO 

WPCH 

WPEN 

WPG 

WPOE 

WPSC 

WPTF 

WQAM 

WQAN 

WQAO 

WQBC 

WQDM 

WQDX 

WEAF 

WEAK 

WEAW 

WEAX 

WEBI 

WEBJ 

WEBL 

WEBQ 

WEBT 

WEBX 

WEC 

WEDO 

WEDW 

WEEC 

WEEN 

WEHM 

WEJN 

WENY 

WEOL 

WEE 

WEUF 

WEVA 

WSAI 

WSAJ 

WSAN 

WSAE 

WSAZ 

WSB 

WSBC 

WSBT 

WSEN 

WSFA 

WSIX 

WSJS 

WSM 

WSMB 

WSMK 

wsoc 

WSPA 

WSPD 

WSSH 

WSUI 

WSTJN 

WSVS 

WSYB 

WSYE 

WTAD 

WTAG 

WTAM 

WTAQ 

WTAE 

WTAW 

WTAX 

WTBO 

WTEL 

WTFI 

WTIC 

WTMJ 

WTNT 

WTOC 

WWAE 

WWJ 

WWL 

WWNC 

WWEL 

WWSW 

WWVA 

WXYZ 



CFAC 

CFBO 

CFCA 

CFCF 

CFCH 

CFCN 

CFCO 

CFCT 

CFCY 

CFJC 

CFLC 

CFNB 

CFQO 

CFRB 

CFRC 

CHCA 

CIICK 

CHCS 

CHCT 

CHGS 

CIILS 

C1IML 

CHNS 

CHRC 

CHWO 



Pawtucket, R. I. (100) 1210 

Chicago, 111. (500) _ 560 

New York City (500) 810 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100) 1500 

Atlantic City, N. J. (5000)..1100 

Patchogue, N. Y. (100) 1370 

State College, Pa. (500).. ..1230 

Raleigh, N. C. (1000) 680 

Miami, Fla. (1000) 560 

Scranton, Pa. (250)...- 880 

New York City (250) 1010 

Vicksburg, Miss. (300) 1360 

St. Albans, Vt. (100) 1370 

Thomasville, Ga. (100) 1210 

La Porte, Ind. (100) 1200 

Williamsport, Pa. (100) 1370 

Reading, Pa. (100) 1310 

Philadelphia, Pa. (250) 1020 

Tifton, Ga. (100) 1310 

Hattiesburg, Miss. (10) 1370 

Columbus, Ga. (50) 1200 

Greenville, Miss. (100) 1210 

Wilmington, N. C. (100) 1370 

Roanoke, Va. (250). -.1410 

Washington, D. C. (500) 950 

Augusta, Me. (100) 1370 

Augusta, Ga. (100).— _.15O0 

Memphis, Tenn. (500) 600 

Lawrence, Kan. (1000) 1220 

Minneapolis, Minn. (1000). .1250 

Racine, Wis. (100) -.1370 

New York City (700) 1010 

Knoxville, Tenn. (50) 1310 

Dallas, Tex. (500) 1280 

Gainesville, Fla. (5000) 830 

Richmond, Va. (5000) 1110 

Cincinnati, O. (500) 1330 

Grove City, Pa. (100) 1310 

Allentown, Pa. (250) ..1440 

Fall River, Mass. (250) 1450 

Huntington, W. Va. (1000) 580 

Atlanta, Ga. (5000) 740 

Chicago, III. (100) 1210 

South Bend, Ind. (500) 1230 

Columbus, O. (50) 1210 

Montgomery, Ala. (500) 1410 

Springfield, Tenn. (100) 1210 

Winston-Salem, N. C (100)1310 

Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 650 

New Orleans, La. (500) 1320 

Dayton, O. (200) 1380 

Gastonia, N. C 1210 

Spartanburg, S. C. (100).... 1420 

Toledo, O. (500) 1340 

Boston, Mass. (500) 1410 

Iowa Citv, la. (500) 880 

St. Petersburg, Fla. (1000) 620 

Buffalo, N. Y. (50) 1370 

Rutland, Vt. (100) 1500 

Syracuse, N. Y. (250) 670 

Quincy, 111. (500) 1440 

Worcester, Mass. (250) 580 

Cleveland, O. (50000) 1070 

Eau Claire, Wis. (1000) 1330 

Norfolk, Va. (500) 780 

College Station, Tex. (500)1120 

Streator, 111. (50) 1210 

Cumberland, Md. (100) 1420 

Philadelphia, Pa. (100) 1310 

Toccoa, Ga. (500) 1450 

Hartford, Conn. (50000) 1060 

Milwaukee, Wis. (1000) 620 

Nashville, Tenn. (5000) 1470 

Savannah, Ga. (500) 1260 

Hammond, Ind. (100) 1200 

Detroit, Mich. (1000) 920 

New Orleans, La. (5000).... 850 

Asheville, N. C. (1000) 570 

Woodside, N. Y. (100) 1500 

Pittsburgh, Pa. (100) 1500 

Wheeling, W. Va. (5000) ...1160 
Detroit, Mich. (1000) 1240 

CANADIAN STATIONS 

Caltrarv, Alta. (500) 690 

St. John, N. P.. (50) 890 

Toronto, Out. (500) 840 

Montreal, Que. (500) 1030 

North Bay, Ont. (250) 1200 

Calgnrv, Alta. (500) 690 

Chatham. Ont (100) 1210 

Victoria, B. C. (500) 630 

Charlottetown, r. E. 1. (250) 960 

Kamloops, B. C. (15) 1120 

Prescott, Ont. (50) 1010 

Krcl. rirkton, N. B. (50).. ..1210 

Saskatoon, s»sk, (500) 910 

Toronto, Onl ( 1000) 960 

Km- Inn, Out (500) 930 

Calgary, Alta. (500) „ .. 690 

Oharlottetown, P. E, I. (30) 960 
Hamilton, Ont. (10) .... 880 

Etl I l><cr, Alta. (1000) 840 

Summer Idi . P E. t ( 100) .1120 

Vancouver, B. 0. (50) 730 

Hamilton, ont (50) 880 

Hnlifnx, N. S. (500) 910 

Quebec, Quo. (100) 880 

Rogina, Sask. (500) 060 



CHWK 

CHYC 

CJBR 

CJCA 

CJCB 

CJCJ 

CJGC 

CJGX 

CJOC 

CJOR 

CJEM 

CJEW 

CKAC 

CKCD 

CKCI 

CKCK 

CKCL 

CKCO 

CKCE 

CKCV 

CKFC 

CKGW 

CKIC 

CKLC 

CKMC 

CKMO 

CKNC 

CKOC 

CKPC 

CKPE 

CKUA 

CKWX 

CKX 

CKY 

CNEA 

CNEC 

CNED 

CNEH 

CNEL 

CNEM 

CNEO 

CNEQ 

CNEE 

CNES 

CNET 

CNEV 

CNEW 

CNEX 

CPEY 



CMHD 

CMHA 

CMGA 

CMBC 

CMBD 

CMBG 

CMBS 

CMBT 

CMBW 

CMBY 

CMBZ 

CMC 

CMCA 

CMCB 

CMCF 

CMCJ 

CMCN 

CMCO 

CMCQ 

CMCX 

CMK 

CMQ 

CMW 

CMX 

CMKC 

CMKE 

CMKH 

CMHC 



HHK 



XFC 

XFF 

XEA 

XEJ 

XEQ 

XEP 

XEY 

XEB 

XEFA 

XEG 

XEN 

XEO 

XETA 

XEX 

XEW 

XEZ 

XFG 

XFI 

XFX 

XET 

XED 

XFM 

XES 

XETF 

XEH 



Chilliwack, B. C. (5) 1210 

Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

Edmonton, Alta. (500) 930 

Sydney, N. S. (50) 880 

Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

London, Ont. (5000) 910 

Yorkton, Sask. (500) 630 

Lethbridge, Alta. (50) 1120 

Sea Island, B. C. (50) 1210 

Moose Jaw, Sask. (500) 600 

Fleming, Sask. (500) 600 

Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

Quebec, Que. (22%) 880 

Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

Toronto, Ont. (500) 580 

Ottawa, Ont. (100) 890 

Waterloo, Ont. (50) 1010 

Quebec, Que. (50) 880 

Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 

Wolfville, N. S. (50) 930 

Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

Cobalt, Ont. (15) 1210 

Vancouver, B. C. (50) 730 

Toronto, Ont. (500) 580 

Hamilton, Ont. (50) 1120 

Preston, Ont. (25) 1210 

Midland, Ont. (50) 930 

Edmonton, Alta. (500) 580 

Vancouver, B. C. (100) 730 

Brandon, Man. (500) 540 

Winnipeg, Man. (5000) 780 

Moncton, N. B. (500) 630 

Calgary, Alta. (500) 690 

Red Deer, Alta. (1000) 840 

Halifax, N. S. (500) 910 

London, Ont. (500) 910 

Montreal, Que. (5000) 730 

Ottawa, Ont. (500).— 600 

Quebec, Que. (50) 880 

Regina, Sask. (500) 960 

Saskatoon, Sask. (500) 910 

Toronto, Ont. (500) 840 

Vancouver, B. C. (500) 1030 

Winnipeg, Man. (5000) 780 

Toronto, Ont. (4000) 960 

Toronto, Ont. (5000) 690 

CUBA 

Caibarien (250) 920 

Cienfuegos (200) 1154 

Colon (100) 834 

Havana (150) 955 

Havana (150) _... 955 

Santiago de las Vegas (150)1070 

Havana (150) _ 790 

Havana (150) „ 1070 

Havana (150) 1010 

Marianac (100) 1405 

Havana (150) _ 1010 

Havana (500) _ 845 

Havana (150) 1225 

Havana. (150) 1070 

Havana (250) 900 

Havana (250) 55(0 

Havana (250) ...1225 

Marianao (250) _ 660 

Havana (600) 1150 

Havana (250) 1010 

Havana (3000) 730 

Havana (250) 1150 

Havana (700) 588 

Havana (500) „... 900 

Santiago de Cuba (150) 1034 

Santiago (250) 1250 

Santiago (250) 1327 

Tuinucu (500) 791 

HAITI 

Port au Prince (1000) 920 

MEXICO 

Ajuas Calientes (350) — . 805 

Chihuahua (250) 915 

Gaudaljara (100) 1000 

Juarez (1001 1000 

Juarez (1000) 750 

Laredo (2500) 1430 

Merida (100) 1000 

Mexico Citv (1000) 1030 

Mexico Citv (250) 1250 

Mexico Citv (2000) 840 

Mexico Citv (1000) 719 

Mexico Citv (5000) 940 

Mexico Citv (500) 1140 

Mexico Citv (500) 1210 

Mexico Citv (5000) 780 

Mexico Citv (500) 588 

Mexico Citv (2000) 638 

Mexico Citv (1000) 818 

Mexico City (500) 860 

Monterrey (500) 1000 

Revnosa '(10000) 075 

Tampion (500) 730 

Tampico (500) 890 

Vera Cruz (500) 680 

Monterrey (5000) 1080 



Call 
Letters 



♦W3XK 
♦W2XCR 
W'JXBU 
*W9XAO 
•W2XCD 



♦W3XAD 
♦W2XBS 

W2XCW 
♦WBXAV 

W.:XR 
*W0XAP 

W3XAX 



W2XAB 

WOXAA 

wnxo 

W2XBO 



♦W1XAV 

woxe 

*W2XE 



Television Stations Now Broadcasting 

Power 
Company and Location (Watts) 

2000-2100 Kilocycles 

■ ''"I' 1 I iboi i "1'n" . Wheaton, Mil 5,000 

Jenkln 1 I Corporation, New Vorli N. Y 5,000 

Harold E, Smith, Beacon, N. Y. 100 

"" Corp., Chicago, m 600 

(Sound Synchronised on 1001 K.), Passlac, N. .1 5,000 

2100-2200 Kilocycles 

1.' 1 \ \ It '"i '-in:. in' . 1 amden, v. .1 iOO 

National Broadcasting Co., New York, N. Y 6,000 

General Electric ''".. s Sohenectady, N. v 20,000 

1 tint 1 1 . 1: Pittsburgh, Pa 20,000 

Radio Plcturi . tnc, 1 iong 1 land City, N, v. BOO 

to I'.ii!' News, Chicago, 111 1.000 

Bound Brook, N. J 5,000 

2750-2850 Kilocyclos 

Ini 'in 500 

Chicago Federation of Labor, Chicago, 111 1.000 

Purdue University, w. Lafayette, Tnd 1,500 

1 tilted Research Corp., Long Island City, N. Y 500 

2850-2050 Kilocycles 

Shortwave ami Television Lab., Inc., Boston, Msbs . 5 00 

(ircat Lakes Broadcasting Co., Downer's Grov.ei 111... 5, 000 

Radio Pictures, in'.. Long Island City, N. Y 500 

*Stations operating on regular schedules. 



Lines per 
Franio 



•18 

• is 
■18 

I i 



60 

1,11 



(10 

.1* 

45 
60 



60 

48 



48 

24 
48 



Ala. 

Ariz. 
Ark. 

Calif. 



State Index— Chain Stations 



Col. 

Conn. 

D.C. 

Fla. 



Ga. 



111. 



Ind. 
la. 

Kan. 

Ky. 
La. 
Me. 
Md. 

Mass. 

Mich. 

Minn 

Miss. 
Mo. 

Neh. 

Nev. 
N.J. 



WAPI 

WBRC 

KTAR 

KTHS 

KLRA 

KGO 

KPO 

KFRC 

KECA 

KFI 

KHJ 

KFSD 

KOA 

KLZ 

WTIC 

WDRC 

WMAL 

WRC 

WFLA 

WJAX 

WIOD 

WQAM 

WDBO 

WDAE 

WSB 

WTOC 

WGST 

KYW 

WBBM 

WENR 

WLS 

WGN 

WIBO 

WMAQ 

WCFL 

WJJD 

WOWO 

WGL 

WFBM 

KOIL 

KSCJ 

WHO 

WMT 

WREN 

WIBW 

KFH 

WCKY 

WHAS 

WDSU 

WSMB 

WLBZ 

WCSH 

WBAL 

WCAO 

WBZ 

WEEI 

WNAC 

WORC 

WTAG 

WBCM 

WXYZ 

WJR 

WWJ 

WCCO 

KSTP 

WJDX 

KMBC 

WDAF 

KMOX 

KSD 

KWK 

KFAB 

WOW 

KOH 

WPG 



1140 
930 
620 
1040 
1390 
790 
680 
610 
1430 
640 
900 
600 
830 
560 
1060 
1330 
630 
950 
620 
900 
1300 
560 
1120 
1220 
740 
1260 
890 
1020 
770 
870 
870 
720 
560 
670 
970 
1130 
1160 
1370 
1230 
1260 
1330 
1000 
600 
1220 
580 
1300 
1490 
820 
1250 
1320 
620 
940 
1060 
600 
990 
590 
1230 
1200 
580 
1410 
1240 
750 
920 
810 
1460 
1270 
950 
610 
1090 
550 
1350 
770 
590 
1380 
1100 



N.Y. 



N.C. 



N.D. 



Ohio 



Okla. 



Ore. 



Pa. 



R.I. 

S.D. 

Tenn. 



Tex. 



Utah 



Va. 



Wash 



Wis. 



Can. 



WABC 

WEAF 

WJZ 

WBEN 

WGR 

WKBW 

WHAM 

WHEC 

WGY 

WFBL 

WOKO 

WBT 

WPTF 

WWNC 

WDAY 

KFYR 

WSPD 

WTAM 

WGAR 

WHK 

WADC 

WKBN 

WAIU 

WCAH 

WLW 

WSAI 

WKRC 

KFJF 

WKY 

KVOO 

KGW 

KOIN 

KDKA 

WCAE 

WJAS 

WLBW 

WHP 

WCAU 

WIP 

WLIT 

WEAN 

WJAR 

WNAX 

WMC 

WREC 

WLAC 

WSM 

WDOD 

KRLD 

WFAA 

WBAP 

WRR 

WACO 

KPRC 

KTRH 

KTSA 

WOAI 

KDYL 

KSL 

WTAR 

WRVA 

WDBJ 

KHQ 

KOMO 

KOL 

KFPY 

KVI 

WTAQ 

WEBC 

WISN 

WTMJ 

CFCF 

CKAC 

CKGW 

CFRB 



860 
660 
760 
900 
550 
1480 
1150 
1440 
790 
1360 
1440 
1080 
680 
570 
940 
550 
1340 
1070 
1450 
1390 
1320 
570 
640 
1430 
700 
1330 
550 
1480 
900 
1140 
620 
940 
980 
1220 
1290 
1260 
1430 
1170 
610 
560 
780 
890 
570 
780 
600 
1470 
650 
1280 
1040 
800 
800 
1280 
1240 
920 
1120 
1290 
1190 
1290 
1130 
780 
1110 
930 
590 
920 
1270 
1340 
760 
1330 
1290 
1120 
620 
1030 
730 
690 
960 



Page 34 



WHAT'S OX THE AIR 



May, 1931 



Stations Classified by Wave-lengths 



640 KC, 555.6 Meters 
CKX — Brandon, Man., Can. 

650 KC, 545.1 Meters 

CMCJ — Havana. Cuba. 
KFDY — Brookings, S. D. 
KFUO — Clayton. Mo. 
IKFYR — Bismarck, N. D. 
IKOAC — Corvallis, Ore. 
KSD — St. Louis. Mo. 
SWGR — Buffalo. N. Y. 
IWKEC — Cincinnati. O. 

560 KC, 535.4 Meters 

KFDM — Beaumont. Tex. 
8KLZ— - Denver, Col. 
jKTAB — Oakland. Calif. 
5WNOX — Knoxvllle, Tenn. 
WFI— Philadelphia, Pa. 
5W1BO— Chicago, 111. 
WLIT — Philadelphia, Pa. 
WPCC— Chicago. 111. 
8WQAM — Miami Beach, Fla. 

570 KC, 526.0 Meters 
KGKO — Wichita Falls. Tex. 
KMTH — Hollywood, Calif. 
KXA — Seattle, Wash. 
WEAO — Columbus, O. 
WKBN — Youngstown. O. 
WMAC — Syracuse. N. Y. 
WMCA — New York, N. Y. 
SWNAX — Yankton, S. D. 
WNYC — New York, N. Y. 
IWWNC — Asheville. N. C. 
WSYR — Syracuse, N. Y. 

680 KC, 516.9 Meters 
CFCL — Toronto, Ont. Can. 
CKCL — Toronto. Ont., Can. 
CKNC — Toronto, Ont., Can. 
CKUA — Edmonton. Alta., Can. 
KGFX — Pierre, S. D. 
KSAC — Manhattan. Kan. 
§WIBW — Topeka. Kan. 
WOBU — Charleston. W. Va. 
WSAZ — Huntington, W. Va. 
WTAG — Worcester, Mass. 

590 KC, 508.2 Meters 
CMW — Havana. Cuba. 
sKHQ — Spokane. Wash. 
WCAJ — Lincoln, Neb. 
SWEEI — Boston. Mass. 
§WKZO — Berrien Sp'gs, Mich. 
§WOW — Omaha, Neb. 
XEZ — Mexico City, Mex. 

600 KC, 499.7 Meters 

CJRM — Moose Jaw, Sask., 

Can. 
CJRW — Fleming. Sask.. Can. 
CNRO — Ottawa, Ont., Can. 
KFSD — San Diego. Calif. 
WCAC — Storrs, Conn. 
WCAO — Baltimore, Md. 
WGBS — New York City. 
WICC — Bridgeport. Conn. 
WMT — Waterloo. la. 
WREC — Memphis, Tenn. 

610 KC, 491.5 Meters 

5HFRC — San Francisco, Calif. 
SWDAF — Kansas City. Mo. 
WFAN — Philadelphia. Pa. 
WIP — Philadelphia, Pa. 
WJAY — Cleveland. O. 

620 KC, 483.6 Meters 

§KGW — Portland, Ore. 
SWFLA — Clearwater. Fla. 
SWSUN — St. Petersburg, Fla. 
8WTMJ — Milwaukee, Wis. 
KTAR — Phcenix, Ariz. 
WLBZ — Bangor, Me. 

630 KC, 475.9 Meters 
Cl'TT — Victoria, B. C. Can. 
C.IG.X — Yorkton, Sask.. Can. 
CNRA — Moncton. N. B.. Can. 
KFRU — Columbia, Mo. 
WGBF — Evansville, Ind. 
WOS — Jefferson City, Mo. 
WMAL — Washington, D. C. 
XET — Monterrey, Mex. 

640 KC, 468.5 Meters 

CHRC — Quebec, Que., Can. 
CMH.l — Cicnfuegos, Cuba. 
S'KFI— Los Angeles. Calif. 
WAIU — Columbus. O. 
8 WO I — Ames. la. 
8XFG — Mexico City, Mex. 

650 KC, 461.3 Meters 

KPCB— Seattle. Wash. 
8WSM — Nashville, Tenn. 
XER — Mexico City. Mex. 

660 KC, 454.3 Meters 
CHWK — Chllllwack, B. C. 
CMCO Havana, Cuba. 
8WEAF — New York City. 
WAAW — Omaha, Neb. 

670 KC, 447.5 Meters 
SWMAQ — Chicago, 111, 

680 KC, 440.9 Meters 

SKFEQ— St. Joseph. Mo. 

§KPO— San Francisco, Calif. 
8WPTF— Raleigh. N. C. 

SBTF -Vera Cruz, Mex. 

8WMC — St. Johns. N. I'\, 
Can. 

690 KC, 434.5 Meters 

CFAC— Calgary, Alta., Can. 
CFCN— Calgary, Alta.. Can. 
cn< \ Calgary, Alia.. Can. 
C.M'.l Calgary, Alta.. Can. 
8CKOW- Toronto, Can, 
CNRC -Calgary, Alta., Can. 
SCPRY— Toronto, Out., Can. 
jVAS -Glace Hay. N. S., 

Can. 
§NAA Arlington. Va. 

700 KC, 428.3 Meters 
§WLW — Cincinnati, O. 

710 KC, 422.3 Meters 
8WOR — Newark. N. J. 
KMI'C— Beverly Hills, Calif. 



§ Stations Using Power of 1000 Watts or More 



720 KC, 416.4 Meters 

s'WGN— Chicago. 111. 
SXEN — Mexico City, Mex. 

730 KC, 410.7 Meters 
CIILS — Vancouver, B. C, Can. 
SCHYC — Montreal, Que., Can. 
5CKAC — Montreal, Que., Can. 
CKCD — Vancouver, B. C., Can. 
CKFC — Vancouver. B. C, Can. 
CKMO — Vancouver, B. C., 

Can. 
SCNRM — Montreal. Que., Can. 
gCMK — Havana, Cuga. 
XEM — Tampico, Mex. 

740 KC, 405.2 Meters 
8KMM.I— Clay Center, Neb. 
§WSB — Atlanta, Ga. 

750 KC, 399.8 Meters 

8W.IR — Detroit, Mich. 
TIC — San Jose, C. R. 
8XEQ — Juarez, Mex. 



760 KC, 394.5 Meters 

8KVI — Tacoma, Wash. 
SWliW — St. Louis, Mo. 
§WJZ — Boundbrook. N. J. 

770 KC, 389.4 Meters 

SKFAB — Lincoln. Neb. 
SWBBM — Chicago, 111. 
s'WJBT — Chicago, 111. 

780 KC, 384.4 Meters 

8CKY — Winnipeg, Man.. Can. 
§CNRW — Winnipeg, M a n.. 

Can. 
KELW — Burbank. Calif. 
WMC — Memphis. Tenn. 
WTAR — Norfolk, Va. 
KTM — Santa Monica. Calif. 
WEAN — Providence, R. I. 
WIS'J — Madison, Wis. 
WPOR — Norfolk, Va. 
§XEW — Mexico City, Mex. 

790 KC, 379.5 Meters 

CMBS — Havana, Cuba. 
CMHC — Tuinucu. Cuba. 
8.KGO — Oakland, Calif. 
SWGY — Schenectady, N. Y. 

800 KC, 374.8 Meters 
SWBAP — Ft. Worth. Tex. 
8WFAA — Dallas, Tex. 
XFC — Aguascalientes, Mex. 

810 KC, 370.2 Meters 
§WCCO — Minneapolis, Minn. 
WPCH — New York City. 

820 KC, 365.5 Meters 
§WHAS — Louisville, Ky. 
SXFI — Mexico City, Mex. 

830 KC, 361.2 Meters 
CMGA — Colon, Cuba. 
8KOA — Denver, Col. 
SWRUF — Gainesville, Fla. 
8WHDH — Gloucester, Mass. 

840 KC, 356.9 Meters 

CFCA — Toronto. Ont., Can. 
8CHCT — Red Deer, Alta., 

Can. 
8CKLC — Red Deer. Alta.. 

Can. 
CMC — Havana, Cuba. 
SCNRD — Red Deer. Alta., 

Can. 
CNRT — Toronto. Out., Can. 
8XETY — Mexico City, Mex. 

850 KC, 352.7 MeteTS 
KWKH — Shreveport. La. 
WWL — New Orleans, La. 



860 KC, 348.6 Meters 
CM.IE — Camaguey, Cuba. 
KMO — Tacoma. Wash. 
SWBOQ — New York City. 
§WABC — New York City. 
WHB — Kansas City. Mo. 
XKX — Mexico City, Mex. 

870 KC, 344.6 Meters 
CMIIH — Cifucntes. Cuba. 
8WENR — Chicago, 111. 
§WLS — Chicago. 111. 



910 KC, 329.6 Meters 

CFQC — Saskatoon, Sask., Can. 
CHNS, Halifax. N. S., Can. 
SCJGC — London, Ont.. Can. 
C.VRH — Halifax, N. S. , Can. 
CNRL — London. Ont.. Can. 
CNRS — Saskatoon, Sask., Can. 

920 KC, 325.9 Meters 
CMHD — Caibarien. Cuba. 
SHHK — Port au Prince, H. 
KFXF — Denver, Col. 
8KOMO — Seattle, Wash. 
WAAF — Chicago, 111. 
5 WW J — Detroit. Mich. 
WBSO — Needham, Mass. 
SKPRC— Houston, Tex. 
KFEL — Denver, Col. 
XFF — Chihuahua. Mex. 

930 KC, 322.4 Meters 

CJCA — Edmonton, Alta., Can. 
CFRC — Kingston. Ont., Can. 
KFWI — San Francisco, Calif. 
KGBZ — York, Neb. 
KMA — Shenandoah. la. 
KROW — Oakland, Calif. 
WBRC — Birmingham, Ala. 
WDBJ — Roanoke. Va. 
WIBG — Elkins Park, Pa. 

940 KC, 319.0 Meters 
SKOIN — Portland. Ore. 
SWCSH — Portland, Me. 
8 WD AY — Fargo. N. D. 
§WFIW — Hopkinsville, Ky. 
WHA — Madison, Wis. 
WAAT — Jersey City. N. 1. 
§KGU — Honolulu, Hawaii. 
8XEO— Mexico City, Mex. 

950 KC, 315.6 Meters 

CMBC — Havana. Cuba. 
CMBD — Havana, Cuba. 
8KFWB — Hollywood, Calif. 
8KGHL — Billings. Mont. 
8KMBC — Independence, Mo. 
WRC — Washington, D. C. 

960 KC, 312.3 Meters 
CFCY — Charlottetown, P. E. 

I.. Can. 
8CFRB — Toronto, Ont., Can, 
CHCK — Charlottetown, P. E. 

I., Can. 
CHWC — Regina, Sask., Can. 
CJBR — Regina, Sask., Can. 
CKCK — Regina, Sask., Can. 
CNRR — Regina. Sask., Can. 
§CNRX — Toronto, Ont., Can. 

970 KC, 309.1 Meters 
CMGF — Matanzas. Cuba. 
SKJR— Seattle. Wash. 
8WCFL — Chicago, 111. 
§XED — Reynosa, Mex. 



980 KC, 305.9 Meters 
SKDKA — E. Pittsburgh, Pa. 

990 KC, 302.8 Meters 
SWBZ — Springfield. Mass. 

1000 KC, 299.8 Meters 
8WHO — Des Moines, la. 
8WOC — Davenport. la. 
KFVD — Culver City. Calif. 
XEA — Gaudalajara. Mex. 
XEC — Toluca, Mex. 
XEE — Linares, Mex. 
XEF — Oaxaca. Mex. 
XEFE — Laredo, Mex. 
XEI — Morelia. Mex. 
XE.l — Juarez. Mex. 
XEL — Saltillo, Mex. 
XEK — Mexico City. Mex. 
XEU — Veracruz. Mex. 
XEV — Puebla, Mex. 
XEY— Mcrida, Mex. 

1010 KC, 269.9 Meters 



CFLC- 
CKCR- 
CKIC- 
CMBW 
CMBZ- 
CMCX- 
KGGF- 
KQW- 
WNAD 
WPAP- 
WIS — 
WRNY 
WQAO 
WHN 



■Preseott. Ont.. Can. 

-Waterloo, Ont., Can. 

Wnlfville. N. S., Can. 

—Havana, Cuba. 

-Havana, Cuba. 

-Havana, Cuba. 

-So. Coffeyville, Okla. 

S'an Jose, Calif. 

—Norman, Okla. 

-Cliffside, N. J. 
Columbia. S. C. 

New York City. 
— New York City. 

New Y'ork City. 



880 KC, 340.7 Meters 1020 KC, 293.9 Meters 



CHML — Hamilton. Out., Can. 
C.ICB — Sydney. N. S., Can. 
CKC1 — Quebec. Que.. Can. 
CKCV — Quebec. Que.. Can. 
c.NRQ — Quebec. Que.. Can. 
KF-KA— Greeley, Col. 
KLX— Oakland, Calif. 
KPOF — Denver. Col. 
WCOC— Meridian. Miss. 
WGB1 — Scranton, Pa. 
WQAN — Scranton. Pa. 
WSUI— Iowa City. la. 



8KFKX— Chicago, 111. 
8KYW — Chicago, 111. 
WRAX — Philadelphia. Pa. 

1030 KC, 291.1 Meters 

8CFCF — Montreal, Que., Can. 
CMCK — Santiago de Cuba. 
CNRV— Vancouver. B. C, 

Can. 
§XEB — Mexico City, Mex. 



890 KC, 336.9 Meters 1040 KC, 288.3 Meters 

8KRLD— Dallas. Tex. 
SKTI1N -lint Springs, Ark. 
8WKAR — E. Lansing. .Midi. 
8VVMAK— Buffalo. N. Y. 



CFBO 
CKCO— 
CKPR— 
C 
KFNF— 
KUSD- 
VYGST- 
WMAZ- 
WMMN 
WILL— 
WKAQ- 
W.IAII-- 
KGJF— 
XES— 'I 



St. John, X. II., Can. 
Ottawa. Ont., Can. 
Port Arthur. Ont., 
an. 

Shenandoah. la. 
Vermillion. S. D. 
-Atlanta, Ga. 
-Macon, Oa. 
— Fairmont. W. Va. 
(Jrbana, 111. 
-San Juan. P. R. 
-Providence. R. I. 
Little Rock, Ark. 
ampico. Mex, 



900 KC, 333.1 Meters 

('.MX -Havana. Cuba. 
CMCK — Havana. Cuba. 
8KH.I— Los Angeles. Calif. 
BWBEN — Buffalo. N. Y. 
SWJAX — Jacksonville. Fla. 
JWKY— Oklahoma City, Okla. 
8WI.HL — Stevens Point. Wis. 
KGBU— Ketchikan, Alaska. 
KSE1 — ;Pocatello, Ida. 



1050 KC, 285.5 Meters 

8KNX— Hollywood, Calif. 
5KFKB- .Mllfi.nl. Kan. 

1060 KC, 282.8 Meters 
KW.IJ — Portland, Ore 
BWBAL -Baltimore, Md. 
BWJAG- -Norfolk, Nab. 
SWTIC — Hartford, Conn. 

1070 KC, 280.2 Meters 

CMBG — Havana. Cuba. 
CMItT — Havana. Cuba. 
CMCB Havana, Cuba, 
KJBS — San Francisco. Calif. 
8WTAM -Cleveland. O. 
WDZ— Tuscola, 111. 
WCAZ— Carthage, ill. 



1080 KC, 277.6 Meters 

8WBT— Charlotte. N. C. 
8WCBD— Zion. III. 
IWMBI — Addison, 111. 
8XEH — Monterrey, Mex. 

1090 KC, 275.1 Meters 

CMAA — Guanajay, Cuba. 
CMGI — Matanzas. Cuba. 
SKMOX— St. Louis. Mo. 

1100 KC, 272.6 Meters 

CMKD — Santiago de Cuba. 
SWLWL — New York City. 
8WPG — Atlantic City. N. J. 
KGDM — Stockton, Calif. 

1110 KC, 270.1 Meters 

CMHI— Santa Clara. Cuba. 
s'KSOO — Sioux Falls, S. D. 
s'WRVA — Richmond, Va. 

1120 KC, 267.7 Meters 
CFJC — Kamloops, B. C, Can. 
CHCS — Hamilton, Ont., Can. 
CHGS — Summerside, P. E. I., 

Can. 
CJOC — Lethbridge, Alta., 

Can. 
CKOC — Hamilton, Ont., Can. 
KFIO — Spokane. Wash. 
KMCS — Inglewood. Calif. 
KESC — Seattle, Wash. 
KFSG — Los Angeles. Calif. 
WDBO — Orlando, Fla. 
WDEL — Wilmington. Del. 
WTAW — College Station, Tex. 
WISN — Milwaukee. Wis. 
WHAD — Milwaukee. Wis. 
KTRH — Houston, Tex. 

1130 KC, 265.3 Meters 

§KSL — Salt Lake City. Utah. 
8VVJJD — Moosehcart. 111. 
s'WOV — New York City. 

1140 KC, 263.0 Meters 
CMGD — Matanzas, Cuba. 
s'KVOO — Tulsa. Okla. 
SWAPI — Birmingham, Ala. 
XETA — Mexico City, Mex. 

1150 KC, 267.7 Meters 

CMCQ — Havana, Cuba. 
CMHA — Cienfuegos. Cuba. 
CMQ — Havana, Cuba. 
8WHAM— Rochester, N. Y. 



1160 KC, 258.5 Meters 

8WOWO — Ft. Wayne, Ind. 
SWWVA — Charleston, W. Va. 

1170 KC, 256.3 Meters 

SWCAU — Philadelphia. Pa. 
SKTNT — Muscatine. la. 

1180 KC, 254.1 Meters 
. CMBG — Matanzas. Cuba. 
CMKG — Santiago de Cuba. 
§KEX — Portland. Ore. 
SKOB — State College. N. M. 
gWDGY — Minneapolis, Minn. 
WHDI — Minneapolis. Minn. 
WGBS — New York City. 

1190 KC, 252.0 Meters 
8WOAI — San Antonio. Tex. 

1200 KC, 249.9 Meters 
CFCH — North Bay, Ont.. Can. 
CMKB — Santiago de Cuba. 
KBTM — Paragould, Ark. 
KFJB — Marshalltown. la. 
KFWF — St. Louis. Mo. 
KGCU — Mandan, N. D. 
KGDE — Fergus Falls. Minn. 
KGDY — Oldham, S. D. 
KGEK — Yuma. Col. 
KGEW — Fort Morgan, Col. 
KGFJ — Los Angeles, Calif. 
KGHI — Little Rock. Ark. 
KGY — Lacey, Wash. 
KMLB — Monroe. La. 
KSMR — Santa Maria, Calif. 
KVOS — Belllngham. Wash. 
KWG — Stockton. Calif. 
WABI — Bangor. Me. 
WABZ — New Orleans, La. 
WBBZ — Ponca City. Okla. 
WCAT — Rapid City. S. D. 
WCAX — Burlington, Vt. 
WCLO — Kenosha, Wis. 
WCOD — Harrisburg. Pa. 
WEHC — Emory. Va. 
WEPS — Worcoster. Mass. 
WFBC — Knoxvllle, Tenn. 
WFBE — Cincinnati. O. 
WHBC — Canton. O. 
W1IBY — Green Bay. Wis. 
WIBX— Utlca, N. Y. 
WIL — St. Louis. Mo. 
W.IBC — La Salle, 111. 
W.IBL — Decatur. 111. 
W.IBW — New Orleans. La. 
WK.IC — Lancaster, Pa. 
WLAP— Louisville. Ky. 
WLBG — Petersburg. Va. 
WNBO — Washington. Pa. 
WNBW — Carbondale, Pa. 
WNBX — Springfield. Vt. 
WORC — Worcester. Mass. 
WRAF— La Porte. Ind. 
WRBL — Columbus, Ga. 
WWAE — Hammond. Ind. 

1210 KC, 247.8 Meters 



CKCO 
CFNB 

C.IOR- 

CKMC 
CKP( 
KDFN 
KDLR 

KFOR 

KFVS- 

KFXM 

KGCR 

KGMP- 

KGNO- 

KM.l 

KPPC- 



-Chatham. Ont.. Can. 
-Frederlckton, N. B., 

Can. 

Sea Island. B. C, 
Can. 
— Cobalt. Ont.. Can. 

Preston, Ont., Can. 

-Casper. Wyo. 

-Devil's Lake. N. D. 

-Lincoln. Nob, 

Cape Girardeau, Mo. 
— S. Bernardino, Calif. 

-Wntertown. S. D. 

-Elk City. Okla. 

-Dodge City, Kan. 

'resnn. Calif. 

Pasadena, Calif. 



KWEA — Shreveport. La. 
WALR — Zanesville, O. 
WBAX — Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
WBBL — Richmond, Va. 
WCBS— Springfield. 111. 
WCOH — Yonkers. N. Y. 
WCRW— Chicago, 111. 
WDWF — Providence, R. I. 
WEBQ — Harrisburg. 111. 
WEDC — Chicago, 111. 
WGBB — Freeport, N. Y. 
WGCM — Gulfport. Miss. 
WHBF— Rock Island. 111. 
WHBU — Anderson. Ind. 
WIBU — Poynette. Wis. 
WJBI — Red Bank, N. J. 
WJBU — Lewisburg, Pa. 
WJBY — Gadsden, Ala. 
WJW — Mansfield. O. 
WLCI — Ithaca. N. Y. 
WLSI — Providence. R. I. 
W.MBG — Richmond. Va. 
WMRJ — Jamaica, N. Y. 
WOCL — Jamestown, N. Y. 
WOMT — Manitowoc, Wis. 
WQDX — Thomasville, Ga. 
WPAW — Pawtucket, R. I. 
WRBQ — Greenville. Miss. 
WSBC— Chicago, 111. 
WSEN — Columbus, O. 
WSOC — Gastonia. N. C. 
WSIX — Springfield. Tenn. 
WTAX — Streator, 111. 
XEX — Mexico City, Mex. 

1220 KC, 245.8 Meters 

CMCA — Havana, Cuba. 
CMCN — Havana. Cuba. 
KFKD — Lawrence, Kan. 
5KWSC — Pullman, Wash. 
WCAD— Canton, N. Y. 
8WCAE — Pittsburgh. Pa. 
§\VDAE — Tampa. Fla. 
SWREN — Lawrence, Kan. 

1230 KC, 243.8 Meters 

KFQD — Anchorage. Alaska. 
§KYA — San Francisco, Calif. 
5WBIS — Boston. Mass. 
8WFBM — Indianapolis, Ind. 
§WNAC — S. Boston. Mass. 
WPSC — State College, Pa. 
WSBT — South Bend. Ind. 
KGGM — Albuquerque. N. M. 

1240 KC, 241.8 Meters 
SKTAT — Ft. Worth. Tex. 
SWXYZ — Detroit, Mich. 
8WACO — Waco, Tex. 

1250 KC, 239.9 Meters 

CMAB — Pinar del Rio, Cuba. 
CUKE — Santiago de Cuba. 
CMGH — Matanzas. Cuba. 
§KFMX — Northfield, Minn. 
SWCAL — Northfield. Minn. 
WCCP — Newark. N. J. 
SWDSU — New Orleans, La. 
WEFA — Mexico City, Mex. 
WGCP — Newark, N. J. 
§WLB — Minneapolis, Minn. 
8WODA — Paterson. N. J. 
5WRHM — Minneapolis, Minn. 
8KFOX — Long Beach, Calif. 
8KIDO — Boise, Ida. 
8WAAM — Newark, N. J. 

1260 KC, 238.0 Meters 
8KOIL — Council Bluffs. la. 
KRGV — Harlingen. Tex. 
KWWG — Brownsville, Tex. 
WLBW — Oil City, Pa. 
KVOA — Tucson, Ariz. 
WTOC — Savannah. Ga. 

1270 KC, 236.1 Meters 

KFUM — Col. Springs, Col. 
KGCA — Decorah, la. 
KWLC — Decorah, la. 
8KTW — Seattle. Wash. 
SWEAI — Ithaca, N. Y. 
WOOD — Grand Rapids, Mich. 
SKOL — Seattle, Wash. 
WASH — Grand Rapids. Mich. 
SWJDX — Jackson, Miss. 
WFBR — Baltimore, Md. 



1280 KC, 234.2 Meters 

CMB.I — Havana, Cuba. 
CMBM — Havana. Cuba. 
CMCG — Havana. Cuba. 
CMCH — Havana. Cuba. 
CMCR — Havana, Cuba. 
CMJB — Ciego de Avila, Cuba. 
WCAM — Camden, N. J. 
WCAP — Ashbury Park. N. J. 
SWDOD — Chattanooga. Tenn. 
WOAX — Trenton. N. J. 
WRR — Dallas, Tex. 
SKF BB — Great Falls. Mont. 
WIBA — Madison. Wis. 

1290 KC, 232.4 Meters 

8KDYL— Salt Lake City. 
KFUL — Galveston. Tex. 
KLCN — Blytheville, Ark. 
BKTSA — San Antonio. Tex. 
SWEBC — Superior. Wis. 
SW.1AS — Pittsburgh, Pa. 
WNBZ — Saranac Lake. N. Y. 

1300 KC, 230.6 Meters 
8KGEF — Los Angeles. Calif. 
sKKH —Wichita. Kan. 
KF.IR — Portland. Ore. 
WBBR — Rnssville. N. Y. 
SKTHI — Los Angeles. Calif. 
KTBR — Portland. Ore. 
WEVD — Forest Hills. N. Y. 
8WHAP — New York City. 
WT1AZ — Troy. N. Y. 
SWIOI) — Miami Beach. Fla, 
§\VOQ — Kansas City, Mo. 

1310 KC, 228.9 Meters 

CMGC — Matanzas, Cuba. 
KCR.l — Jerome. Ariz. 
KFBK — Sacramento. Calif. 
KFGQ — Boone. la. 
KFIU — Juneau. Alaska. 
KFJY — Ft. Dodge, la. 
KFPL — Dublin. Tex. 
KFPM— Greenville. Tex. 
KFUP — Denver. Col. 
KFXJ — Edgewater. Col. 
KFXR — Oklahoma City. Okla. 
KGBX— St Joseph. Mo. 
KGCX— Wolf Point. Mont. 



KGEZ — Kalispell, Mont. 
KGFW— Ravenna. Neb. 
KIT — Yakima, Wash. 
KMED. Medford. Ore. 
KRMD — Shreveport. La. 
KTLC — Houston, Tex. 
KTSL — Shreveport, La. 
KTSM— El Paso, Tex. 
KWCR — Cedar Rapids, la. 
KXRO — Aberdeen. Wash. 
WBOW — Terre Haute, Ind. 
WBEO — Marquette. Mich. 
WBRE — Wilkes-Barre, Pa. 
WCLS — Joliet, 111. 
WDAH — El Paso. Tex. 
WEBR— Buffalo, N. Y. 
WEXL — Royal Oak. Mich. 
WFBC — Altoona, Pa. 
WFDF — Flint, Mich. 
WGAL — Lancaster, Pa. 
WGH — Newport News. Va. 
WHAT — Philadelphia. Pa. 
WJAC — Johnstown. Pa. 
WJAK — Marion, Ind. 
WKAV — Laconia. N. H. 
WKBB — Joliet. 111. 
WKBC — Birmingham, Ala. 
WKBS — Galesburg, III. 
WLBC — Muncie, Ind. 
WMBO — Auburn, N. Y. 
WNBH — New Bedford. Mass. 
WOBT — Union City. Tenn. 
WOL — Washington. D. C. 
WRAW— Reading. Pa. 
WRBI — Tifton. Ga. 
WROL — Knoxville, Tenn. 
WSAJ — Grove City, Pa. 
WSJS — Winston-Salem, N. C. 
WTEL — Philadelphia, Pa. 

1320 KC, 227.1 Meters 

CMJC — Camaguev, Cuba. 
KTFI — Twin Falls, Ida. 
8WADC — Akron. O. 
WSMB — New Orleans, La. 
KID — Idaho Falls, Ida. 
KGMB — Honolulu. Hawaii. 
KGHF — Pueblo, Col. 

1330 KC, 225.4 Meters 

CMKH — Santiago de Cuba. 
CMJA — Camaguey. Cuba. 
KGB — S'an Diego, Calif. 
SKSCJ — Sioux City. la. 
WDRC — Hartford. Conn. 
WSA1 — Cincinnati, O. 
§WTAQ — Eau Claire, Wis. 

1340 KC, 223.7 Meters 
CMBA — Havana, Cuba. 
C.MBF — Havana, Cuba. 
CMCD — Havana, Cuba. 
CMCU — Havana. Cuba. 
CMCY — Havana, Cuba. 
KFPW — Fort Smith. Ark. 
gKFPY — Spokane, Wash. 
WCOA — Pensacola. Fla. 
WSPD — Toledo, O. 

1350 KC, 221.1 Meters 
8KWK — St. Louis. Mo. 
WAWZ — New York City. 
WCDA — New York City. 
WBNX — New York City. 
WMS'G — New York City. 

1360 KC, 220.4 Meters 

CMKF — Holguin, Cuba. 
sKGER — Long Bead). Calif. 
KGIR — Butte. Mont. 
SKPSN — Pasadena. Calif. 
WCSC — Charleston. S. C. 
8WFBL — Syracuse. N. Y. 
WGES— Chicago. 111. 
8W.IKS — Gary. Ind. 
WQBC — Vicksburg. Miss. 

1370 KC, 218.8 Meters 
CMGE — Cardenas. Cuba. 
KCRC — Enid, Okla. 
KFBL — Everett. Wash. 
KFJI — Astoria, Ore. 
KFJM — Grand Forks. N. D. 
KFJZ— Ft. Worth. Tex. 
KFLX — Galveston. Tex. 
KGAR — Tucson, Ariz. 
KGDA — Mitchell. S. D. 
KGFG — Oklahoma City, Okla. 
KGFL — Raton. N. M. 
KGKL — San Angelo. Tex. 
KMAC — San Antonio, Tex. 
KONO — San Antonio. Tex. 
KOOS — Marshfleld. Ore. 
KRE — Berkeley, Calif. 
KUJ — Walla Walla. Wash. 
KVL — Seattle, Wash. 
KWKC — Kansas City. Mo. 
KZM — Hayward. Calif. 
WBTM— Danville. Va. 
WBGF— Glen Falls. N. Y. 
WCBM — Baltimore. Md. 
WELK— Philadelphia. Pa. 
WFDV — Rome. Ga. 
WGL- — Fort Wayne, Ind. 
WHBD— Mount Orab. O. 
WHBQ — Memphis. Tenn. 
WHDI' — Calumet. Mich. 
WIBM — Jackson. Mich. 
WJBK — Ypsilanti. Mich. 
WI.1TY — Lexington, Mass. 
WLVA — Lvnchburg. Va. 
WMItR— Tampa, Fla. 
WPOE — Patehogue. N. Y. 
WQDM — St. Albans. Vt. 
WRAK — Williamsport, Pa. 
WRB.I — Hatticsburg, Miss. 
WRBT — Wilmington. N. C. 
WRDO — Augusta. Me. 
WR.IN — Racine, Wis. 
WSVS— Buffalo, N. Y. 

1380 KC, 217.3 Meters 
KOH — Reno. Nev. 
KQV — Pittsburgh. Pa. 
KSO — Clarinda. la. 
8WKBH- I. a Crosse, Wis. 
WSMK — Dayton, O. 

1390 KC, 215.7 Meters 

SKI, HA— Little Rock. Ark. 
SKl'OA — Kayettcville. Ark. 

5WHK — Cleveland. O. 

KOY -Phcenix, Ariz. 

1400 KC, 214.2 Meters 
CMBI — Havana. Cuba. 
CMBK— Havana, Cuba. 

< MUX — Havana. Cuba. 

< .MRQ— Havana. Cuba. 



CMBX 
C.MBY 
KLO— 
KOCW 
WCMA 
WCGU 
WBAA 
WBBC- 
WKBF 
WFOX 
WLTH 



—Havana, Cuba. 
—Havana. Cuba. 
Ogden, Utah. 
— Chickasha. Okla. 

Culver. Ind. 
— Coney Island, N. Y 
West Lafayette, Ind 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 
-Indianapolis.. Ind. 
: — Brooklyn. N. Y. 
Brooklyn. N. Y. 



1410 KC, 212.6 Meters 
SKGRS' — Amarillo. Tex. 
KFLV — Rockford. 111. 
WDAG — Amarillo, Tex. 
WHBL — Sheboygan. Wis. 
WBCM — Hampton Township. 

Mich. 
WHIS — Bluefleld. W. Va. 
WLEX — Lexington, Mass. 
WODX — Springhill, Ala. 
WSFA — Montgomery, Ala. 
WSSH — Boston, Mass. 
WRBX — Roanoke. Va. 

1420 KC, 211.1 Meters 
KBPS- Portland. Ore. 
KFIZ — Fond du Lac. Wis. 
KFQU — Holy City. Calif. 
KFQW — Seattle, Wash. 
KFXD — Jerome. Ida. 
KFXY — Flagstaff. Ariz. 
KFYO — Abilene. Tex. 
KGFF — Alva, Okla. 
KGGC — S'an Francisco. Calif. 
KGIW — Trinidad. Col. 
KGIX — Las Vegas. Nev. 
KGKX — Sand Point. Ida. 
KGVO — Missoula, Mont. 
KICK — Red Oak, la. 
KLPM — Minot. N. D. 
KORE — Eugene, Ore. 
KTAP — San Antonio. Tex. 
KXL — Portland. Ore. 
KXYZ^ — Houston, Tex. 
WEDH — Erie, Pa. 
WEHS — Evanston. 111. 
WELL — Battle Creek, Mich. 
WFDW — Talladega. Ala. 
WHDL — Tupper Lake, N. Y. 
WHFC — Cicero. 111. 
WIAS — Ottumwa, la. 
WIBR — Steubenville. O. 
WILM — Wilmington. Del. 
WJBO — New Orleans. La. 
WKBI— Chicago. 111. 
WLBF — Kansas City, Kan. 
WMBC — Detroit. Mich. 
WMBH — Joplin. Mo. 
WPAD — Paducah. Ky. 
WSPA — Spartanburg. S. C. 
WTBO — Cumberland. Md. 

1430 KC, 209.7 Meters 

CMHE — Santa Clara. Cuba. 
8KECA — Los Angeles. Calif. 
KGNF — No. Platte, Neb. 
WCAH — Columbus. O. 
WBAK — Harrisburg. Pa. 
WGBC — Memphis, Tenn. 
WHP — Harrisburg, Pa. 
WNBR — Memphis. Tenn. 
8XEP — Laredo. Mex. 

1440 KC, 208.2 Meters 
KLS — Oakland. Calif. 
WBIG — Greensboro. N. C. 
WCBA — Allentown, Pa. 
WHEC — Rochester, N. Y. 
WMBD — Peoria Heights. 111. 
WOKO — Albany. N. Y. 
WTAD — Quincy. 111. 
WSAN — Allentown, Pa. 

1450 KC, 206.8 Meters 

CMKA — Santiago de Cuba. 
8KTBS — Shreveport, La. 
WBMS— Ft. Lee. N. J. 
WGAR — Cleveland, O. 
WHOM — Jersey City. N. J. 
WKBO— Jersey City. N. J. 
WNJ — Newark. N. J. 
WSAR — Fall River. Mass. 
WTFI — Toccoa. Ga. 

1460 KC, 205.4 Meters 

5KSTP— St Paul. Minn. 
BWJSV — Alexandria. Va. 

1470 KC, 204.0 Meters 
BWLAC— Nashville, Tenn. 
IWTNT— Nashville. Tenn. 
§KGA — Spokane, Wash. 

1480 KC, 202.6 Meters 

SKFJF— Oklahoma City, Okla. 
§WKBW — Amherst. N. Y. 

1490 KC, 201.6 Meters 

fWCHI — Chicago, 111. 
SWCKY — Covington. Ky. 
5 \v.i AZ— Chicago. 111. 

1500 KC, 199.9 Meters 

CMBL — Havana, Cuba. 
CMBI' — Havana. Cuba. 
CMBR — Havana. Cuba. 
CMCM — Havana. Cuba. 
C.MCT — Havana. Cuba. 
CMIII1 — Sagua la Grande, 

Cuba. 
KDB — Santa Barbara. Calif. 
KOFI — Corpus Christi. Tex. 
KGFK — Moorhead. Minn. 
KGIZ^ — Grant City. Mo. 
KGKB — Brownwood. Tex. 
KGKY — Seottsbluff. Neb. 
KP.IM — Preseott. Ariz. 
KPQ — Wenatchee. Wash. 
KREG — Santa Ana. Calif. 
Kl'T — Austin. Tex. 
KXO— El Centro. Calif. 
WCLB — Long Beach. N. Y. 
WDIX— Tupelo. Miss. 
WKBV — Connersvllle, Ind. 
WKI1Z — Ludington, Mich. 
WI.P.X— Long Island City. 

N. Y. 
WLOE — Boston. Mass. 
WMBA— Newport. R. I. 
WMBQ — Brooklyn. N. Y. 
WMPC — Lapeer. Mich. 
WXBF — Binghamton. X. Y. 
WOPI — Bristol. Tenn. 
WPEN — Philadelphia. Pa. 
WRDW — Augusta. Ga. 
WSYB — Rutland, Vt. 
WWRL — Woodside, N. Y. 
WWSW — Pittsburgh. Pa. 










From early childhood, LILLIAN TAIZ has had a way of delighting her audiences — and she is not so thoroughly grown-up yet. Her rise 
to stardom on the musical comedy stage and before the microphone reads like those beloved fair)' tales wherein the beautiful and talented heroine 
is providentally recognized by the powers that be — the powers in this story being: Dr. Lucy Langdon Wilson, Leopold Stokowski, George 
Gershwin, the Messrs. Aarons and Freedley and the Columbia Broadcasting System. 




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orraarb 



J)rokeruskire 




A quartet of artists who 
need no introduction to 
followers of radio. "Broke" 
is back in New York, and 
will soon be heard over 
the CBS chain. 

ALMA PETERSON, 
popular NBC soprano, 
was featured on a recent 
NBC Artist Service 
program. ROBERT SIM- 
MONS' tenor voice is 
often heard on N B C 
programs. OLIVE 
PALMER sings exclusive- 
ly each week on the 
Palmolive Hour. 







/ 



./ 



fetersorb 



©live 



► 




/ 



S.E.JUN -1 193! 

THE RADIO LISTENER'S PROGRAM GUIDE 



WhdtS 



on 
the 

AND WHO WILL PUT IT THERE IN JUNE 1931 



nir 



D 




VOL 2. N0.8. 



CHILDREN ON THE AIR -PAGE 17 



PRICE 15 CENTS 




TrEsh 2MR / 

T6,xiCab Co. 

Of &M^R<;A INC, 



While nationally BILL HAY is known as the an- 
nouncer for Amos 'n' Andy, in Chicago and vicin- 
ity he is thought of as a favorite announcer and 
artist of Station WMAQ. Bill was the Gosden and 
Correll announcer long before the boys were taken 
over by NBC, and, when they went "chain," they 
insisted that their "WMAQ relationship should be 
continued in spite of the fact that WMAQ is af- 
filiated with CBS. Even when the boys are in New 
York, Bill usually is their announcer by means of a 
long-distance telephone hook-up between WMAQ 
studios and WJZ, New York. 



Here are "JOE AND VI," warming up to another 
bit of family argument which will last "far, far 
into the night." Graybar's "Mr. and Mrs." pro- 
grams each Tuesday at 10 p. m. (E. D. T.) have 
a wide following; and Jack Smart as "Joe" and 
Jane Houston as "Vi" have a host of admirers 
among radio listeners. Hundreds have written in 
for pictures of "Joe and Vi." Here they are. 







WHAT'S ON THE AlR 

THE MAGAZINE FOR THE RADIO LISTENER 



VOLUME II. 



JUNE, 1931 



No. 8 



^eieufslon {eeps proarcd file vpmer 

^ Don Dagte 



PART TWO 

STATIC is not going to bother television much. 
A recent demonstration of television reception 
in New York during an electrical storm proved this 
point. Excepting for slight white streaks flashing 
across the screen coincident with the lightning, no 
harm was done and the pictures flicked on un- 
molested. 

During the past few weeks there have been a 
number of interesting developments along the tele- 
vision front. 

The Columbia Broadcasting System has definitely 
announced that it will be on the air throughout 
the summer with an experimental television pro- 
gram daily for six hours. 

Some, months ago CBS selected Natalie Towers, 
a young and very beautiful actress, as its television 
girl. Last week NBC announced that it had signed 
Dorothy Knapp to fill a similar role there. 

Meanwhile WGBS and W2XCR are continuing 
their sight-and-sound broadcasts with very encour- 
aging results. 

Chicago and Boston likewise are continuing tele- 
vision programs, although nothing startling has 
been reported from cither of these cities in the way 
of new developments. Boston will be on sixty- 
line scanning after June 1, as will Station W3XK 
in Washington. All New York stations have 
adopted this standard. 

Make-up on the faces of artists who appear be- 
fore the television camera is considered of utmost 
importance. Such make-up is neither like that of 
the stage nor screen. It is more vivid and of the 
most grotesque color combinations. 




Charles E. Butterfield, radio editor of the Asso- 
ciated Press, who has been making an exhaustive 
study of this phase of the new industry, told this 
writer that red-headed girls are the best for tele- 
vision, with the brown heads a close second. Blondes 
are not so good, because there is not sufficient con- 
trast. 

Noses are dangerous to beauty when it comes to 
the television camera. If not properly powdered 
and colored by grease paint, they look unnaturally 
large and very, very red. 

During its summer experiments the Columbia 
System plans to employ a number of its sustaining 
acts. "Those who have had motion-picture experi- 
ence," Edwin K. Cohan says in a recent statement, 
"will be televised from time to time. Morton 
Downey and the Dodge Twins are foremost in this 
group." 

Other reports from the large broadcasting sta- 
tions show that a tremendous army of theatrical 
people are seeking to establish themselves for tele- 
vision. At the present there is little hope for them, 
especially since the networks are going into the 
new field only in an experimental manner for the 
time being. 

As the technique of television is improved, so 
will a new art be born — an art entirely different 
from the motion-picture world and the sound- 
broadcasting studios, an art which will be individ- 
ually and wholly adapted to the new science. 

Reactions of the general public to television arc 
sometimes very amusing. For example, some aver- 
age radio listeners are of the belief that television 
has been perfected to the point that pictures with 
the clarity of present-day movies are obtainable 
with simple equipment. 

True enough, pictures are available from quite 
simple equipment, but they are not anywhere nearly 
so clear as movies of even ten years ago. 

For example, television reception is such that 






These two young women 
rfcel ion, "televi- 
sionally speaking." They are 
ilic Television Girls "f NB( 
.ind < BS, rcspe< tivel) . and 
will Ik- .i major incentive !"r 

folk to equip with short - 

wave television lets. 



only the head and shoulders of the subject can be 
seen with any great clarity. Two people in the pic- 
ture are the limit for the televisor of to-day. Back- 
ground detail is missing. However, television has 
progressed. It is marvelous — even miraculous — 
that pictures of any kind can be transmitted hun- 
dreds of miles through nothing more substantial 
than air! 

Television to-day is sending you pictures of old 
film, wooden cats, dolls and pictures of orchestra 
leaders, and the like. Of them all, the silhouettes 
(black and white action pictures) are the most in- 
teresting. Why? Because they have action, and 
plenty of it. 

To this writer's way of thinking, television will 
be given its first real impetus when the two nation- 
wide radio networks begin to conduct experimental 
programs. 

Then, there's the high cost of equipment. Is 
there any reason why television receivers should cost 
so much? 

If you possess a short-wave receiver, one which 
will tune from 100 to 200 meters and one that 
should possess wide band tuning and resistance- 
coupled audio, you need only the televisor. Yet this 
televisor, employing a synchronous motor, a scan- 
ning-disk, a neon tube and a magnifying-glass, will 
cost you (completely assembled) somewhere in the 
neighborhood of $100. 

With all these so-called drawbacks television is 
here and it is going to stay with us for some time 
to come. Prices will be cut. They've got to be 
cut. Programs will improve, and sight and sound 
will be successfully synchronized. 




cOorothy 
I\n&/pp 

NBC 




atalie 
ouJeroT 

CBS 



. 



Page 4 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



june, 1 93 1 



THIS summer people will 
listen to radio just about 
as much as they have the past 
winter. 

That is no daring prophecy. 
It is a certainty, so sure and 
so much a matter of course 

that many a rooky in the listener army probably 
thinks it hardly worth mentioning. But 'twas not 
ever thus. Ask any old-timer. 

Back in the days when fans had something akin 
to cauliflower ear from wearing headphones, radio 
passed out of the picture in summer about as com- 
pletely as winter wraps. If a B battery went dead 
or a tube blew in May, it wasn't thought worth 
while to replace it till September, because precious 
little listening would be done until then. Careful 
souls even dismantled the bristling breadboards ihat 
were the last word in sets and packed them away in 
a cool, dry place, the next best thing to mothballs. 
Station schedules — none too plump anyway — were 
pared down to a skeleton. Of course a few of the 
undaunted sweated under headphones to browse 
about the dial now and then. But for the most 
part radio simply marked time from June to Sep- 
tember. 

It's as much of a laugh as the quaint days when 
everybody jacked up the family chariot and deflated 
the tires for the winter, isn't it? But it's true. 
And the anwer is Old Man Static. 

He was not just a convenient excuse, either. Far 
from it. When a 5 00-watt station was something 
to get excited about, and a 1,000-watter was an 
awesome superpower outfit, static really meant 
something, especially with antiques at the receiving 
end. It's small wonder that radio had such a strug- 
gle to iron out the "summer slump." But now, as 
everybody knows, the job has been done. 

Every year for the last three or four the hot- 
weather hurdle has been topped more and more 
easily. And this year it has dwindled so much that 
it threatens to be no obstruction at all. 

Higher station power is, of course, the big thing 
that is making summer safe for radio. With 5,000 
watts common and the cleared-channel boys ham- 
mering out to the tune of 50,000 watts, it takes 
a man-sized thunder-storm to kick up as much as a 
ripple in loud-speakers within ordinary reception 
range. 

And another thing that helps mightily is th; 
wider distribution of chain programs. In the old 
days only a dozen or two stations were tied to- 
gether for big features. This meant that many lis- 
teners had to rely on an outlet 500 or 1,000 miles 
away; not so good in hot weather with low power. 
But now, with forty to sixty stations hooked up 
nightly, the cream of the air shows can be picked 
up close enough home to assure high-class reception 
under almost any conditions. 

However, still another thing that has done its 
bit in making radio a year-round proposition, in- 
stead of a winter-only pastime, is the steady im- 
provement in receivers. Most present-day listeners 
may not know it, because they did not tinker with 
single-circuit squealers of the vintage of 1922. But 
the fact is that modern receivers .deliver more pro- 
gram and less static than their museum-piece pred- 
ecessors, which has made listening considerably 
more enjoyable while Old Sol is beaming down on 
Mother Earth. 

But "even after that," as Andy would say, there 



VOL. II. No. 8. Published monthly at Ninth and Cutter 
Sts., Cincinnati, O., by What's on the Air Co. Printed 
in U. S. A. Price, 15c. per copy; $1.50 per year, in 
advance. 

Copyright, 1931, by What's on tiik Air Co. Title registered 
in U. S. Patent Office. 

Entered as second-class matter, Apr. 19, 1930, at the post- 
office at Cincinnati, O., under the Act of March 3, 1879. 



Scmner K&ri? o 7 1*131 Style 



are reasons why 1931 promises to provide more 
summer pleasure than any other year in radio's his- 
tory. They are the automobile receiver and the 
midget. 

The automobile set makes it possible to take a 
cooling drive, hear a favorite program and enjoy 
both, to paraphrase an advertising line. With one 
of these efficient receivers in a car, the question of 
staying at home to get a popular program or tak- 
ing a pleasant ride after a punishing day is disposed 
of without a moment wasted on argument. Both 
can be done simultaneously, thanks to the perfec- 
tion of the little set tucked behind the dashboard. 

On camping tours, too, they offer much pleasure 
without inconvenience. After a long day's trek, it 
is not necessary to unpack a set from dusty lug- 
gage, make intricate connections and shin up a tree 
to fasten a temporary aerial. Wherever the car is 
stopped for the night's bivouac, programs can be 
had for nothing more troublesome than the turn of 
a switch. That may not be roughing it in the 
best wild- West manner, but it is comfort. 

The now popular midget also has particular sum- 
mer advantages, both at home and in camp. 

At home it enables radio to be brought to the 
coolest spot, instead of requiring the listener to go 
to the radio. On an extension cord (no aerial or 
ground is needed for local reception) the little fel- 
low can be moved to the porch or into the yard, 
wherever there is a haven from the heat. Com- 
pared with the alternative of turning up a perma- 
nently installed receiver so it can be heard at a re- 
mote point, this arrangement will appeal instantly 
to the neighbors, if not the owner. 

And for the migrating army of summer cot- 
tagers the midget can do as much. Brought from 
home in no more space than a bag, it can be 
plugged into an outlet wherever the proper current 
is available (by the way, be sure about that before 



WE return to our April system of program 
service. We thank the hundreds who 
wrote. We have had twenty thousand letters 
from listeners containing suggestions as to the 
service they desire. As facilities permit, we 
shall hope to meet the want felt by the ma- 
jority of folks who like to know just what is 
on the air and where to get their choice when- 
ever they are in a mood to listen. 



throwing the switch, unless repair bills mean noth- 
ing in your carefree life), and the transplanted fire- 
side is complete even to radio. 

Also, either with the "half-pinter" or a car re- 
ceiver, the summer vacationist can expect to get 
something more from radio than programs that 
might be heard at home. If his wanderings take 
him even a moderate distance from his winter baili- 
wick, he is pretty certain to get a fresh viewpoint 
on broadcasting. 

Small stations, which he may not be able to hear 
at home because of congested channels, can be 
picked up in the new location. The station back 
home that he may not regard so highly because it 
is just a home-town local will warm his heart like 
the voice of an old friend when it comes through. 
There will be a fresh zest to dialing, and, still more, 
he will get an illuminating insight into what radio 
is like in another section of the country. That 
alone ought to be worth while, after one has been 



accustomed to thinking in 
t;rms of his own territory. 

As to programs themselves, 
every indication points to 1931 
being the banner summer of 
radio thus far. A few fea- 
tures will be canceled because 
their sponsors' products are seasonal in character. 
A few others will go off the air because artists will 
be away from the studios on vacations. But most 
of the programs which make up the backbone of 
schedules will go on just as they did during the 
winter months. 

Besides, features which are not heard during the 
winter will provide special interest along several 
lines. Sports broadcasting will be much in the spot- 
light, with baseball, racing and the Stribling- 
Schmelling fight to draw fans to loud-speakers. 
Outdoor concerts will do as much for music lovers. 
Already Columbia has announced that it will air 
the notable Lewissohn Stadium concerts, and the 
NBC probably will carry the Goldman Band pro- 
grams from Central Park, as has been its custom 
for the past few years. 

Yes, the summer of 1931 will be a far cry from 
the days when radio was put away along with the 
heavy underwear. In fact, the once prevalent 
"summer slump" looks to be as gone forever as the 
aforementioned apparel. 



NBC PLANS FOR THE SUMMER 

The American radio audiences will be served 
programs of consistently higher quality than dur- 
ing any previous summer schedule. The warm 
weather slackness, always expected until last year, 
has been eliminated, according to NBC executives, 
who contemplate the most active season in radio 
history. 

Many program sponsors will continue their pro- 
grams through the summer, instead of deserting the 
air waves, as was the practice several years ago. 
Many of these programs will be revised to meet the 
requirements of the hot season. 

The greatest improvement will be found in the 
special broadcast events and the international ex- 
change of programs of all types. More and more, 
radio takes its place as a supplement to the daily 
newspaper, and the program director's schedule 
grows as uncertain as the city editor's assignment 
sheet. No one can predict positively what will be 
broadcast to-morrow. Of course, the program 
schedules are made up weeks in advance, and the 
listener can rest assured that he may expect to hear 
his favorite programs regularly, but unusual pro- 
grams and events will be offered him daily. 

It has been arranged, almost definitely, that the 
Poughkeepsie Regatta on the Hudson will be heard 
over the air June 16, and the Yale-Harvard boat- 
race on June 19. NBC short-wave mobile trans- 
mitters will be mounted on the observation trains, 
and announcers, keeping abreast of the shells, will 
describe the sight. 

A series of one-hour pop concerts by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra are scheduled for Saturday 
nights during June and part of July. Numerous 
conventions will have NBC microphones present 
before the speakers' dais. RKO is planning a pick- 
up from the Westchester Country Club. Many 
famous horse-races will be described over the air, 
including the rich Belmont Futurity in September. 

Plans are under way for having announcers fol- 
low the leaders in the Ryder Cup golf matches be- 
tween English and American amateurs at Colum- 
bus, O., June 27, and the next week the National 
Open Championship matches will be aired for the 
stay-at-homes. 

Newton D. Baker's address to the graduating 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 5 




"SALT AND PEANUTS," favorites at WLW. 

class of Mechanics' Institute, Rochester, N. Y., will 
be heard over an NBC network Tuesday, June 9, 
as will Maj.-Gen. Smedley D. Butler's address at 
Charlestovvn, Mass., on the eve of Bunker Hill Day, 
Tuesday, June 16. These are merely examples of 
the talks of varied interest that listeners may hear 
during the summer months. 

In the field of world-wide broadcasts, NBC ex- 
pects to establish new records, performing marvels 
of program exchanges that only the most daring 
believed possible a few years ago. The first will be 
a pick-up of the great English Derby at Epsom 
Downs, June 3. Racing experts, distributed around 
the track, will give a running commentary of this 
historic sporting event. Similar contests will be 
picked up from other countries. 

During the winter Americans have become ac- 
customed to hearing programs originating in En- 
gland, Italy, France, Germany, South America, 
Hawaii, Australia, Japan and from aboard ships at 
sea. In addition to many political leaders of every 
important country, the Pope and other prominent 
church-members have spoken over the air waves to 
an entire world. Radio carries the listener around 
the world in a few minutes. Anything seems pos- 
sible. 

It is not only possible, but highly probable, that 
transatlantic fliers, explorers in distant lands and 
scientists, engaged in portentous experiments, will 
speak direct from the midst of their activities to 
all civilization. If Lindbergh were to repeat his 
memorable flight to Paris now, he undoubtedly 
would carry a transmitter and personally broadcast 
his progress. It could be done. It is possible some 
one will within a few weeks. 

Studio programs promise many novelties, ac- 
cording to writers, directors and artists. Margaret 
Anglin, noted stage star, will play the title role in 
a radio dramatic series based on the life of Joan of 
Arc. The Women's Radio Review, recently inau- 
gurated by NBC, gives the afternoon schedule a 
presentation equaling in quality the favorite night- 
time concerts. This one-hour show includes a 
prominent dance-orchestra program, selections by 
vocal soloists and instrumentalists, and talks on 



topics of interest to women by leading authorities. 
NBC is planning innovations in dramatic broad- 
casting intending to develop this type of program 
to greater heights. 

And behind it all moves the hand of fate, hold- 
ing in its grasp television, that elusive invention 
that lures on to greater effort scientists, and in fact 
all concerned with broadcasting. Television, like 
prosperity, is said to be just around the corner, and 
who knows but that the waiting world will arrive 
at that as yet unmarked corner during these sum- 
mer months? 



SOME CBS HIGH SPOTS 

There is plenty of enthusiasm on tap out at the 
Madison Avenue headquarters of CBS. Of the 
more than half a hundred sponsored programs at 
present broadcast over the Columbia network, forty 
have definitely decided to continue on the air 
through the summer months, and pending negotia- 
tions make certain that nearly a score of new pro- 
grams will be added to the commercial list in the 
near future. 



One of the most ambitious summer-time radio 
series in the history of broadcasting commences over 
the Columbia System June 1, when R. J. Reynolds 
& Company, makers of Camel cigarets, brings to- 
gether on one feature Morton Downey, Anthony 
Wons and Jacques Renard, all of whom have been 
outstanding, single, sustaining entertainers. 

Sixty associated stations of the Columbia System 
will carry the Camel Quarter-hour Series daily ex- 
cept Sunday at 7:45 p. M., E. D. S. T., for Eastern 
listeners, and again at 11:30 p. m., E. D. S. T., for 
Western and Pacific Coast listeners. 

Downey is to be the star of the series, while 
Wons will be master of ceremonies, contributing 
bits of wisdom and philosophy from his scrap-book. 
Both Downey and Wons have been outstanding 
sensations so far this year. Morton Downey made 
his debut as a regular network broadcaster last De- 
cember, and his rise to fame has been spectacular, 
to say the least. 

Wons is not new to radio, having been a micro- 
phone personality for nearly nine years. He has, 
however, during the last year broken all existing 
records for fan-mail response. Thousands upon 
thousands of fan letters pour into the studios every 
month. Wons, by the way, is perhaps the only 
radio artist extant who can boast of having 90 per 
cent, of his material contributed from the radio 
audience. 

Renard, who will direct the orchestra, has sev- 
eral things of which to boast. For one, he weighs 
more than Paul Whiteman. His band has been the 
talk of New England for ten years, although only 
recently it has been brought to the ears of 
America through the medium of a nation- 
wide network. 

Aside from his announcerial duties on the 
Camel scries, Wons will contribute some of 
his original sayings and his inimitable laugh, 
which many say is a good deal like that of 
Will Rogers. 

These "three horsemen" of 
radio, who have trodden sep- 
arate roads to fame and for- 
tune, will come together of- 
ficially for the first time at 
7:4 5 p. m., E. D. S. T., June 
1, for the grand premier. 



Rosa Ponselle, American- 
born prima donna soprano 



of the Metropolitan Opera Company, will be 
heard over a nation-wide network of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System from 3 to 3:45 p. m., E. D. 
S. T., Monday, June 1, when a part of a perform- 
ance of Verdi's opera, "La Forza del Destino," is 
relayed to this country from the stage of the Royal 
Opera House, Covent Garden, London. 

Since her debut in London in 1929, the appear- 
ance of Miss Ponselle at the Royal Opera House has 
been one of the outstanding events of the London 
opera season. 

$g 

Bert Lown and his Biltmore Orchestra have 
been engaged to co-star with Bradford Browne and 
Al Llewelyn in the Francis H. Leggett & Company 
"Premier" radio programs this summer. The fif- 
teen-minute broadcasts will be routed over the en- 
tire Columbia basic network, excepting KMOX, St. 
Louis, but with the addition of KTRH, Houston, 
Tex., each Thursday at 9 p. m., E. D. S. T. 

Browne and Llewelyn will continue as the "Pre- 
mier Chefs," featuring their "synchronized conver- 
sation" and the presentation of a new original com- 
position each week. 

Si 

The schedule of Daddy and Rollo programs, for- 
merly broadcast every Tuesday, Wednesday and 
Thursday at 7:45 p. m., E. D. S. T, over the Co- 
lumbia network, has been changed, after the broad- 
cast of May 28, to 7:30 p. m., E. D. S. T., every 
Sunday, Tuesday and Thursday. 

The first broadcast on the new time schedule will 
be Sunday, May 3 1 . 

The program, written by J. P. McEvoy, author 
of "Showgirl" and "Mr. Noodle," is acted by Nick 
Dawson and eleven-year-old Donald Hughes, and is 
sponsored by La Palina. 

To the strains of an overture played on their 
"mighty gas-pipe organ," the Tastyeast Gloom- 
chasers ushered in their nightly program of comedy 
over CBS from 8:45 to 9 o'clock, E. D. S. T., Sun- 
day, May 24. 

This presentation, new to the network, but one 
that has achieved sensational popularity in Buffalo, 
largely consists of extemporaneous dialogue between 
a certain erratic "Col. Lemuel Q. Stoopnagle" and 
his eccentric pal "Bud." These roles are taken by 



DICK ROBERTSON 
and "SCRAPPY" 
LAMBERT are the 
"Mac ami Al" nf the 
McAlecr Polishers. 




Page 6 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 



F. Chase Taylor and Wilbur Budd Hulick, respec- 
tively. Those who heard this act over WGR and 
WKBW, Buffalo, during the past eight months pre- 
dict that it will become one of the most popular on 
the air. 

"The Colonel and Bud" will be heard over the 
network every evening but Fridays, from 8:45 to 9 
o'clock, E. D. S. T. Their "ad lib" programs em- 
brace everything from astonishing imitations of 
prehistoric monsters, soul-stirring dramas and sword 
dances to the crooning of popular songs. 



Kate Smith, popular vaudeville and musical- 
comedy star recently signed by Columbia, will re- 
place Morton Downey on the latter's five-times- 
weekly schedule of fifteen-minute programs, which 
he is abandoning for the new Camel Quarter-hour 
Series, beginning June 1. 

Kate Smith was born in Washington, D. C, and 
was graduated from the public schools there. Her 
early interests were divided between singing and 
the study of medicine, with her family believing 
the latter a more dignified and worthy calling. The 
lure of the footlights was stronger than their preju- 
dices, however, and in 192 5 Kate made her debut 
in the Capitol's Keith Theatre. 

Eddie Dowling heard her performance and forth- 
with engaged her for "Honeymoon Lane." Fol- 
lowed, within the next five years, successful engage- 
ments with "Hit the Deck" and George White's 
"Flying High." 

She recently played a week's engagement at the 
Capi,tol Theatre in New York with such success 
that she was re-engaged for eight additional weeks. 



Henry Burbig, pioneer radio comedian, returned 
to the air in a new series of sustaining programs 
over CBS Saturday, May 23, at 8:15 p. m., E. D. 
S. T. 

In his new series Burbig is assisted by Nat Bru- 
siloff and his jazz band. Each of the presentations 
last fifteen minutes. 

Although Burbig presents his sketches in the 
usual Jewish dialect style which has made him a 
familiar figure in the broadcasting world, he also 
introduces variations and a new idea he has devel- 
oped in connection with his burlesques of the old 
fables. 

Sg 

A series of interviews with radio celebrities, to 
be known as "Meet the Artist," will be broadcast 
over the Columbia network every Thursday at 5:45 
p. M., E. D. S. T. Morton Downey, tenor, was the 
guest on the premier broadcast May 28. He was 
interviewed by Bob Taplinger, Columbia writer, 
who will conduct the feature each week. 



AS WE GO TO PRESS 

THE Women's Radio Review is an afternoon 
daily series which combines entertainment and 
information of interest to women. Since its inau- 
guration over an NBC-WEAF network on May 4, 
it has brought before the microphone several noted 
leaders among women. 

Presented every day except Saturday and Sunday, 
it offers an hour of novelty music interspersed with 
special features on fashions, home entertaining, in- 
terior decoration and other matters of women's in- 
terest. 

These informative features are presented by espe- 
cially selected experts. All matters pertaining to 
food and its allied subjects are in charge of Mrs. 
Sarah Jordan. Elaine Page tells listeners about 
fashions in dress and beauty styles. Jean Harvey 
has been assigned to the subject of home decorating, 
housekeeping and similar matters. 

Mrs. Claudine MacDonald, whose experience in- 
cludes direction of exclusive women's clubs, social 
settlement work, the stage, the microphone and 
housekeeping, is director of the entire series. 

Vincent Lopez, the aristocrat of orchestra direc- 
tors, with an orchestra of musicians picked for their 
versatility, together with vocal soloists, entertains 
the listeners of the Women's Radio Review with 
popular American dance melodies, Oriental music, 
compositions from Latin America, concert music 
and salon arrangements. The vocalists include Ruth 
Ann Watson, contralto; Leslie Joy, baritone; Rich- 
ard Maxwell, tenor, and Ted Jewett, who serves as 
master of ceremonies. 

Prominent women who have appeared on this 
program include Mrs. Harold I. Pratt, a leader in 
the Garden Club of America; Rose O'Neil, artist 
and noted as illustrator of the kewpies for various 
national magazines and newspapers; Mrs. Lewis 
Slade, vice-chairman of the New York League of 
Women Voters; Mrs. Eve Garrette Grady, the 
American woman who was expelled from Russia for 
writing a joke about Dictator Stalin, and Virginia 
Dale, short-story writer and former dramatic critic. 

Elizabeth Arden, one of the world's foremost 
authorities on the subject of beauty and its care, is 
heard each Thursday afternoon on this program. 



Margy, the steno, walked into Mr. Harrison's 
office at the Pearly Dew Rice Company on a recent 
Saturday, asked where she could hang her hat, and 
got a job without the O. K. of Miss Blake, office 
manager. That began a series of adventures for 
Margy which NBC is presenting each Saturday at 
7:30 p. m., E. D. T. Margy and her humanly 
funny experiences as a New York stenographer are 
created by a blonde young lady who knows the life 



herself. She is Elizabeth R. Todd, secretary to 
Burke Boyce, continuity editor of the NBC. The 
central characters of the comedy series are: Margy, 
played by Marcella Shields; Miss Blake, the office 
manager, played by Helene Handin, and the boss, 
Harrison, portrayed by Jack McBride. 



Thrilling episodes in the settlement of the old 
West are dramatized in a new broadcast series, "Red 
Goose Adventures," now being presented over fifty- 
nine stations associated with CBS every Friday at 
7:30 p. m., E. D. S. T. 

Primarily designed to appeal to the younger gen- 
eration of listeners, the "Red Goose Adventures" 
give particular emphasis to historical accuracy. Ex- 
tensive research has been made to uncover dramatic 
incidents of the Western pioneer days which hither- 
to have escaped attention. Even the incidental 
music is authentic of the period. 



After almost two years of absence from CBS, 
during which time they played in motion pictures 
and Hollywood supper clubs, George Olsen and his 
orchestra are now heard twice weekly — every Mon- 
day and Friday at 11:30 p. m. — over the nation- 
wide Columbia network. This popular orchestra 
now is engaged at "Dells," a fashionable Chicago 
rendezvous. 

The biggest contract ever offered for a series of 
movie shorts has been signed by Floyd Gibbons, 
NBC broadcaster and former war correspondent. 

He will appear in a series of thirteen shorts, en- 
titled "Floyd Gibbons' Supreme Thrills," to be pro- 
duced by A. P. Waxman and Michael Mindlin ir 
association with the RKO-Van Beuren Corporation. 

The shorts will be produced in New York, start- 
ing immediately, so that the contract will not 
interfere with Gibbons' scheduled appearances over 
NBC networks. 

Gibbons has been featured at the Palace Theatre, 
the goal of all vaudeville troupers, and has ap- 
peared on lecture programs as well as before NBC 
microphones, but this marks his debut in the movies. 



The "Sweetheart Hour," which has been heard 
on Sunday evenings over CBS for the past three 
months, has been transferred to the 5:45 p. m. 
period on Tuesdays. Adele Vasa, Barbara Maurel, 
Ben Alley and Evan Evans form the quartet which 
shares the program with a concert orchestra. 



The summer series of General Electric broadcasts 
will continue each Saturday night to offer Floyd 



THE program-finding 
service of What's on 
the Air covers the hours 
from 4 p. m. to 1 a. m., 
E. D. T., or 3 to midnight, 
C. D. T., for every day in 
April. It is so simple as 
scarcely to need explanation. 



GUIDE TO PROGRAM SERVICE (pp. 18-31) 

How to Find the Program You Want When You Want It 



TO MAKE A LONG- 
DISTANCE TEST (DX) 



There is but one 



thing to 

remember — programs preceded by figures or letters 
in squares are NBC programs; programs preceded by 
figures in circles or black letters a to k are 
Columbia programs; all other symbols refer to 
local programs. 

Suppose Sunday, June 7, about 3 o'clock, a new reader 
at Des Moines desired to select a program. He might best 
turn to pages 18 and 19, at the inner side of which the 
programs for June 7 are listed, and read over what is 
offered at 3 P. M., C. D. T. He would find [ll Dr. 
Cadman, [3] Williams' Oilomatics and (1) Cathedral 
Hour. Referring to the station list and watching the 



3 o'clock channel, at Iowa stations he would find that 
Council Bluffs was carrying (1) the Cathedral Hour, 
as were Waterloo and Sioux City, and that Des Moines 
was offering [l] Dr. Cadman. To get [3] Wil- 
liams' Oilomatics, however, he would have to go further 
afield. A quick glance up and down the 3 o'clock channel 
reveals that WREN, at Lawrence, Kan., is probably the 
nearest station carrying {}]; but WGN, at Chicago, also 
carries it, and WGN happens to have a clear channel and 
may be easier to get. At any rate, our new Des Moines 
reader is able, in a few seconds, to choose and find the most 
promising program. 

FOR IMPORTANT DAYTIME PROGRAMS SEE PAGE 16. 



Ascertain which of your 
local stations are broadcast- 
ing chain features at the 
moment. Tune in one of 
these and find out what number is being rendered. Then start 
your detector dial at either end of its arc and turn slowly. 
As soon as you hear the same number, note your dial setting 
and check back to the column showing wavelength (on 
page 34), thus ascertaining the approximate wavelength 
of the station you are receiving. To the left of this col- 
umn you will find the call letters of stations on the wave- 
length of that station and those having approximately that 
wavelength. Reference to the schedule of programs apply- 
ing to the time you are listening will show you which of 
these stations is broadcasting the program to which you 
are listening, and you can thus identify it without having 
to wait for call letters. 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 7 




BETH AND BETTY DODGE 



CBS 



CAMEL QUARTER-HOUR features Jacques Renard, Anthony Wons and Morton Downey. 



Gibbons in talks featured as "Adventures in 
Science." In place of Walter Damrosch, Erno 
Rapee will preside over the symphony orchestra. 



Henry Thies and his orchestra, permanently at- 
tached to the staff of WLW at Cincinnati, are 
heard over NBC in a concert of popular music each 
Sunday night at 11:30, E. S. T. Charlie Dameron, 
popular WLW tenor, is an added attraction. 



Fifty-five stations affiliated with CBS are carry- 
ing the "Star Reveries" program Sundays at 10:45 
p. m., E. D. T. Helen Gilligan and Milton Watson 
are the soloists in these revivals of favorite oper- 
ettas of the ->ast. 



Dennis King, star of stage and screen, has been 
engaged for the new Linit program to be broad- 
cast from 7 to 7:15 p. M., E. D. S. T., five times 
a week over the Columbia network. The program 
will be heard nightly from Monday to Friday, in- 
clusive, and will begin on Monday, June 15. 

Dennis King is best known for his version of 
the dashing and romantic Francois Villon in both 
the stage and talkie productions of "The Vagabond 
King," and for his part as the equally romantic 
D'Artagnan in the Broadway production of "The 
Three Musketeers." 

He has been heard on the air before as a guest 
artist, but this will be his first appearance as a regu- 
lar featured radio star. 



BETH AND BETTY DODGE 

THEY look alike, they talk alike and they dress 
alike — but they don't like alike. 

All of which is by way of introducing the sub- 
jects of another "success" story — the Dodge twins, 
Beth and Betty — who, after winning the plaudits 
of theater-goers on both sides of the big pond, al- 
ready have carved for themselves a prominent niche 
in radio's own hall of fame. Twice weekly, Mon- 
days and Fridays at 5:3 o'clock, they appear in 
their own program of songs and dialogue, broad- 
cast from the studios of WABC over the Columbia 
network. 

No two peas in a pod ever resembled each other 
more than do these sisters. Announcers, produc- 
tion men and studio attendants experience much 
difficulty in determining "who's who," addressing 
the girls in a hesitant and uncertain voice. It is 
their first experience in handling a twin act. Often, 
however, the girls come to their rescue with an 
"I'm Beth" and "I'm Betty." 

The words "dodge" and "hit" hardly mean the 
same thing in the ordinary vernacular, but when 
the first is spelled with a capital "D," then they 
become synonymous. Whether in this country or 
abroad, the twins have made one hit after another. 

At the age of nine, Beth appeared as soloist in 
a bird-whistling novelty number with the Chicago 
Symphony Orchestra. Her whistling, done by in- 
serting the small fingers between the teeth, is 
known to audiences in Germany, England, France, 
Norway and Italy, where the girls have been most 
enthusiastically received. 



In London they were integral parts of Cochran's 
revue, "Turned Up" and "Oh Kay;" Paris saw them 
for fourteen months in the Folies Bergere; Berlin 
theater-goers witnessed their performances in Ernest 
Haller's lavish musical production; the patrons of 
Oslo, Norway, disproved their reputation for cold- 
ness by giving the Dodge twins the warmest recep- 
tion ever accorded a visiting artist; in Rome the 
stage was covered with flowers and other tokens of 
esteem at the termination of their month's engage- 
ment. 

Back on these shores, they were featured in a 
"Night in Venice," and subsequently headlined the 
major vaudeville circuits in their own presentation. 

It was only through a chance visit to the Colum- 
bia studios last month that they became interested 
in radio, their air debut as featured artists of "Radic 
Roundup" resulted, and so well did they perform 
that CBS signed them under an exclusive contract. 

And now, in an entirely new field, the talented, 
black-haired and big-eyed girls again are making 
good, taking to the microphone like ducks to water 
and finding in their growing fan mail more thrills 
than in the enthusiastic applause of audiences at the 
Folies Bergere. 

Oh, yes, they have their nicknames. Betty, who 
blushes at the slightest provocation — an asset — is 
called "Beety," after the color of that edible known 
as the beet. Beth answers to "Do" (pronounced 
"dough"), because her first name is Dora, and that 
was the only way Betty, as a child, could pro- 
nounce it. 

Incidentally their car carries the family name on 
the radiator. 



"GLOOM CHASERS" WHO PRESENT FIFTEEN MINUTES OF LAUGHS SIX NIGHTS A WEEK 

F. Chase Taylor and Wilbur Budd Hulick, "tlie Tastycast Gloom Chasers," present fifteen minutes of 
"ad lib" humor and nonsense over the Columbia network at 8:45 p. M., E. D. S. T., every evening but 
Fridays. Taylor, at left, is known over the air as "The Colonel," and Hulick as "Bud." Everything 
from astonishing imitations of prehistoric monsters to heart-throbbing melodramas and sword dances feature 
their programs. 



KATE SMITH BRINGS HER "SWANEE MUSIC" TO < BS 

"I'm not much good at posing for pictures, bin how's this?" Anns 
thrown wide, head back and lips parted for singing, Kate Smith faced 
the camera. 

"Did you get the entire picture on one plate?" she asked, and in that 
sentence she summed up her attitude of unconcern toward the entire 
avoirdupois situation. 




Page 8 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 



Jookfnct JJrtro4M$ii ihe ^yfudfo^cope 



NBC page-boys refer to sound-effects men 
as "noise racketeers." 



Vincent Lopez often wears horn-rimmed 
spectacles while directing his orchestra in the 
NBC studios. 



Ray Kelly, NBC sound-effects expert, has a 
new collection of animal noises since the circus 
came to town. 



When a man marries a woman for her 
money, he may collect the principal, but he 
usually loses interest. — Pathfinder. 



Bob MacGimsey, NBC's phenomenal three- 
toned whistler, writes negro spirituals during 
vacations on his Louisiana plantation. 



'29 — What's your name? 
'32— J-J-J-Jim, sir. 

'29 — Fine; 1*11 call you Jim for short.- 
Judge. 



"Fatleigh is not near as big a fool as he 
used to be." 

"Why, has he reformed?" 
"No, he's been dieting." 



A letter addressed, "Amos and Andy. You 
know where," was delivered properly to the 
two NBC comedians with the penciled nota- 
tion, "Smart people, these post-office clerks." 



Al — Why am a snake differunt from a flea? 
Paul — I dunno. Why? 

Al — 'Cause a snake crawls on its own 
stomach an' a flea am not so pahticulah. 



Franz Baumann, NBC tenor and star of the 
German motion picture "Student Days," is 
returning to Berlin for the summer to make a 
series of movie shorts. 



Rosaline Greene, NBC dramatic actress, is 
spending most of her spare time these days 
with her family out on Long Island. She is 
developing a flower garden. 



Miss Patty Field, former member of the 
United States Diplomatic Corps, who deserted 
that Government service to join the NBC 
sales promotion force, is vacationing in Europe. 



NBC's leading floriculturist is Kathleen 
Stewart, pianist. Miss Stewart brings great 
quantities of various flowers to the studios 
daily from her home at Palisades, N. Y. 



Sunday-school Teacher — If I saw a man 
beating a donkey and stopped him, what virtue 
would I be showing? 

"Brotherly love," said Robert, promptly. — 
Los Angeles Times. 



"With a single stroke of a brush," said 
Daddy, taking his son around the National 
gallery, "Joshua Reynolds could change a 
smiling face to a frowning one." 

"So can my mother," said Rollo. 



Portrayal of a Chinese character by Jack 
Daily in a recent Empire Builder dramatiza- 
tion, "Shoes of Eloquence," from the NBC 
Chicago studios, was not without concrete 
foundation. Daily spent eleven years in China. 



Mose — What yo' all doin' wid dat diction- 
ary, findin' some big words fo' another speech 
at de lodge? 

Sambo — No, ah's jes' translatin' de speech 
ah made las' night. — Pathfinder. 



Station WISJ, Madison, Wis., is doing a big 
service for DXers. Each Saturday at midnight 
a fine type of artists is assembled at these 
studios, and, if the weather is favorable, a 
program is carried on until about four o'clock 
Sunday morning, with approximately every 
half-hour information on DX programs. 



Peter Dixon's advice to youngsters who wish 
to become good newspaper men is: "Read and 
study the complete works of O. Henry!" 
Dixon is author of "Raising Junior," daily 
NBC feature, and he also recently completed 
a book on radio writing. 



The business men were talking over their 
employees. 

"Well, old Johnson has grown gray-haired 
in my service." 

"Pooh! I've got a girl with me who has 
grown yellow, brown and red haired in my 
service." 



"I don't see why Senator Frost got sore be- 
cause the Morning Bugle announced he was 
retiring from politics." 

"Well, the make-up man by mistake put 
the article under the heading, 'Public Im- 
provements.' " — Pathfinder. 



The difference between a Harvard man and 
a Yale man was explained by Heywood Broun 
in a talk over WABC. Mr. Broun said: 
"When a Yale man is sick, the authorities as- 
sume he is intoxicated. When a Harvard man 
is intoxicated, they assume he's sick." 



Jolly Bill Steinke, one of the heaviest of the 
heavyweight broadcasters around NBC studios, 
always was overweight. During his childhood 
days on a farm near Allentown, Pa., Bill usu- 
ally was carried along on the hay-wagon. He 
tramped down the hay while the others piled 
it into the wagon. 



"Which am de most usefulest, Amos, de sun 
or de moon?" 

"Why, de moon, ob cose." 

"How come de moon?" 

"Kase de moon, he shine in de night when 
we need de light, but de sun, he shine in de 
day when light am ob no consequence." 



B///— Gwan! I'll bet a ten-spot you don't 
even know the Lord's Prayer. 

Sam — Well, I have you this time, old chap. 
"Now I lay me down to sleep, I pray the Lord 
my soul to — " 

Bill — Here's the ten; I didn't think you 
could do it. 



Internationalism of music holds a greater 
meaning for Josef Koestner, director of the 
Armour Hour Orchestra from the Chicago 
NBC studios, than it does to many musicians. 
Koestner was born in Bavaria, studied French, 
German, Spanish, Russian and Italian com- 
posers under French and German instructors, 
and has members of thirteen different nation- 
alities and races in his orchestra. 



NBC recently received a letter from a 
Westerner who explained he recently heard a 
number entitled "Sioux Boys" played over the 
air. He said he knew the Sioux Indians well, 
and asked for details about the song. NBC 
music experts investigated and found the 
writer had referred to a French song entitled 
"Sous Bois," which means "under the woods." 



East and Dumke, known to radio as the 
Sisters of the Skillet, are threatening to resign. 
They have received the last insult, the two 
jovial and corpulent comedians declare, after 
reading the following inquiry received by 
NBC: 

"Please inform me what is meant by 'East- 
ern Donkey.' We hear this program every 
afternoon at 2:45 over an NBC network. It 
is the Sisters of the Skillet program." 



Graham McNamee was recently being photo- 
graphed with Dorothy Knapp, former "Miss 
America," who has been engaged by NBC for 
experimental television programs. As Mc- 
Namee and Miss Knapp posed holding hands, 
the photographers apologized for the delay. 

"Oh, don't hurry, boys," responded the an- 
nouncer. "This is the first time in my life 
I've enjoyed waiting." 



About the most ancient and dilapidated mu- 
sical instrument to be found around NBC is 
owned by Guy Bonham, one of the three 
Tastyeast Jesters. It is a trumpet that is held 
together by bits of wire, string and other for- 
eign ties. The instrument won't play unless 
first warmed by a bath in steaming-hot water, 
and it often grows cold during the middle of 
a selection. Then it becomes useless. 



The NBC chain is beckoning to another 
rising young artist, Don Becker, who has been 
a staff member of Station WLW, Cincinnati, 
for these past four years, and in that time he 
has developed into a musical composer, a radio 
playwright, a radio satirist, a radio producer 
and an announcer. On May 11, last, Becker 
played the solo ukulele with Hugo Mariani's 
Symphonic Rhythm-makers on the WEAF- 
NBC network, the work being Becker's own 
"Indigo Moon." 



Reports have been published that B. A. 
Rolfe, director of the Lucky Strike Orchestra, 
directs without a baton, and conflicting re- 
ports state that he uses the longest baton to 
be found around the NBC studios. Our own 
sleuth decided to discover why these incon- 
sistent stories were circulated. He found that 
each is true. Rolfe uses no baton while ac- 
tually broadcasting, but during rehearsals uses 
a slender bamboo cane nearly three feet long. 



During his "Be Kind to Animals Week" 
program, Gene Austin, who is repeating his 
success as a recording artist before the micro- 
phone, offered a dog to any listener who would 
give it a home. Within a few days he re- 
ceived more than a thousand requests. So as 
not to disappoint any one, Austin went to the 
Bide-a-Wee-Home for stray animals, New 
York, and arranged to send a dog to each per- 
son making the request. They emptied the 
Home. 



John Royal, director of programs for NBC, 
hereafter will caution applicants for radio 
work to tone down their auditions. Recently 
Royal sat in his office, listening to an audition 
being piped in from a studio. 

"Quite hot, isn't it?" he remarked to a 
visitor. 

"Yes, quite," was the answer; "in fact, it 
is so hot that your radio set is on fire." 

And, true enough, billows of smoke were 
pouring forth from the loud-speaker set on 
fire by a short circuit. 



Imagine the consternation of Lloyd E. 
Yoder, manager of the Press Relations Depart- 
ment of NBC's Pacific Division, when he 
found a car full of money parked in his 
garage! The only drawback was — it wasn't 
Lloyd's car or his money. Three bold bandits 
held up a bank near the NBC executive's 
home, and, when pursued by the police, drove 
into his garage and escaped in a second car. 
The bank recovered the money, and all Lloyd 
got was a surprise. 



The Tastyeast Jesters recently discontinued 
their thrice weekly commuting from Hartford, 
Conn., to New York for their NBC broad- 



casts. They now live in New York, but dur- 
ing the commuting-days the boys became well 
known by all porters and conductors on the 
railroad, who rarely missed an opportunity "to 
drag the radio artists into the smoking-room 
and there make them put on a private per- 
formance which usually drew most of the 
passengers for an audience. 



High-school students of Connecticut hear 
their assembly hall speakers by radio. Through 
an arrangement between officials of Station 
WTIC of Hartford and the State Board o_ 
Education, "preppers" throughout the Nutmeg 
State gather each Thursday morning in their 
assembly halls, which are equipped with radio 
receivers. Through their loud-speakers the 
students hear prominent statesmen, educators 
and industrial leaders, who deliver their talks 
from the WTIC studios. 



The curious continue to ask Phil Cook, 
NBC's one-man army of voices, if he is a 
brother of Joe Cook, noted stage comedian. 
The answer is "No." They aren't really re- 
lated, and Joe Cook's name isn't really Cook. 
He is Joe Lopez, of Spanish and Irish par- 
entage — no, he isn't related to Vincent Lopez, 
the orchestra leader, either, for Lopez' real 
name — oh, well, let's get back to Phil Cook, 
who does have a brother who has contributed 
to radio entertainment. He is Burr Cook, 
author of the exciting Harbor Lights melo- 
dramas and several other NBC dramatic pro- 
grams. 

Si 

The youth seated himself in the dentist's 
chair, bedecked in a gorgeous, striped shirt and 
an even more gorgeous, checked suit with the 
"sailor pants" effect that was once the vogue. 
The dentist surveyed the blank face, the shoe- 
string necktie, the slicked-down hair, and then 
turned to his assistant. 

"I'm afraid to give him the gas," he whis- 
pered. 

"Why?" 

"Well, how shall I know when he's uncon- 



Eugene F. Brazeau, of the NBC sales de- 
partment, came into his office one morning re- 
cently and began telling fellow-wirkers about 
the fire that raged in his apartment-house the 
night before. His story-telling was inter- 
rupted by a yell near by. 

"Brazeau, your desk is on fire!" 

Flames were leaping from the desk. Some 
one had dropped a cigaret which ignited a 
sheaf of papers. 

Brazeau is the salesman in charge of a 
cigaret account. 



Muriel Wilson, NBC soprano, wonders if 
she is to be the next victim of gangsters. She 
was awakened from very sound slumber one 
night recently by the crash of broken glass 
and the noise of a falling object. Hastily 
jumping up, she was frightened by the sight 
of broken window-panes. Shattered glass lay 
over the floor, and on the foot of her bed was 
an innocent-looking brick. The street below 
was deserted, but now the singer puts pro- 
tecting screens over the window. 



Rudy Vallee, radio crooner who has starred 
over the air, in motion pictures, in vaudeville 
and as a recording artist, will appear next in 
a Broadway musical revue. Vallee has signed 
a contract to take a lead role in the forth- 
coming edition of George White's "Scandals," 
scheduled to open in New York about July 1. 
In addition, he and his Connecticut Yankees 
will move into the Pennsylvania Roof to en- 
tertain dancers nightly during the summer 
months. Vallee will continue his Thursday 
night Flcischmann broadcasts over an NBC- 
WEAF network, and, according to present an- 
nouncements, his latest radio series of Sunday 
evening programs. 



"You will now hear an announcement in 
the manner of Norman Brokenshire," said 
Mike Porter, radio editor of the New York 
Evening Journal, when he spoke over Colum- 
bia recently during "Bill Schudt's Going to 
Press" program. It seemed, indeed, to be 
Brokenshire who then spoke. Several listeners 
called up to ask if he were back on the air. 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 9 




Vincent 




KickarcL 
i%>ai?eli 




f\u.tn. cnnn 
Watsorb 



FEATURED FIVE DAYS A WEEK ON THE WOMEN'S RADIO REVIEW OVER NBC 




The speaker, however, was Ted Husing, who 
has spent enough time with Norman to be 
able to mimic him to the life. Porter also 
had Morton Downey and Henry Burbig as 
assistants. The radio editor promised his au- 
dience that he would imitate the radio celebri- 
ties. They were in the studio to fill in when- 
ever Porter gave them the signal. 

Oddly enough, before one radio listener had 
lingered long enough to hear the closing an- 
nouncement, he telephoned the Columbia stu- 
dios to protest about the "imitation" of Mor- 
ton Downey singing "Wabash Moon." 

"That was a rank imitation and very poorly 
done," he told the hostess. "I'll bet Mr. 
Downey will be furious when he hears about 
it!" 



"Maybe times are getting better," muses 
Richy Craig, Jr., Blue Ribbon Malt Jester on 
the Columbia network, "but lots of people are 
still cutting up their wallets to make inner 
soles." 



Gagsters, all these announcers of Station 
WTIC of Hartford. As evidence, witness 
these: 

Paul Lucas, chief announcer, calls "Blue 
Room Echoes" the "Blume Room Echoes" be- 
cause Joe Blume directs the program. 

Ja:k Brinkley, another announcer, calls Paul 
Lucas by the name "Palookas," contracting the 
two names. 

Jack also calls the Ilima Islanders the 
"Eczema Islanders." 

Here's hoping that the boys don't forget 
themselves some day and send some of their 
puns out over the ether waves. 



It is said that Richy Craig, Jr., CBS Blue 
Ribbon Malt Jester, originated the gag about 
the garage man who put up the sign reading: 

"Cars Washed, $2.00; Austins Dunked, 35 
cents." 



It seems hardly possible that it could have 
happened, but it did. 

Freddie Rich, who guides Columbia dance 
orchestras, played the "Peanut Vendor" on 
one of his recent broadcasts, all of which is 
not news. But when Freddie emerged from 
the studio a telephone call awaited him. 

It was a listener who wanted to know the 
name of the piece, and why the tune wasn't 
played more often. 



Julie Ryan, four-year-old sister of Pat Ryan, 
leading "man" of Columbia's juvenile feature, 
"Adventures of Helen and Mary," was a re- 
cent visitor at Columbia. A studio executive, 
wishing to make friends with the youthful 
Julie, asked her if she could spell "cat." 

"I," said Julie, haughtily, "can spell 'ency- 
clopedia.' " 

And she could and did. 



If big Bill Hansen, of the Pine-tree Melo- 
deers over Columbia, had his way, there would 
be one less barber in town. Bill had been 
very busy and a long time passed before he 
was able to get a hair-cut. 

The other day he went into a barber shop 
and sat waiting in a chair. A barber came 
over, looked at Bill quizzically, and asked: 
"Sir, is this your first bob?" 



At dinner with a Massachusetts politician in 
Washington recently, Frederic William Wile, 
Columbia's political analyst, remarked that his 
most faithful fan was an old woman living in 
Taunton, Mass. She sent him a barrel of ap- 
ples, two dozen jars of home-made jelly and 
a home remedy for colds last winter. 

"Did you say Taunton?" the Congressman 
asked. 

"Yes," said Wile. 

"Taunton's where our State Insane Asylum 
is located," commented the New Englander. 



Steffy Goldner, harpist in the orchestra 
heard on the weekly programs of the CBS 
Dutch Masters, gave her first solo recital at 
the age of twelve before Emperor Franz Josef, 
of Austria. Her first harp teacher was Vicki 
Baum, noted German writer, whose novel 
"Grand Hotel" is a best seller and whose play 
of the same name is the most sensational dra- 
matic hit of the current season on Broadway. 
Steffy is a cousin of Joseph Schildkraut, stage 
and motion-picture star, and is the wife of 
Eugene Ormandy, who conducts the Dutch 
Masters' Orchestra. 



Eddie Freckman, accompanist for the Pabst- 
ett Variety Hour — over the Columbia net- 
work Tuesday and Friday, 2 to 2:15 p. M. — 
was literally riddled with machine-gun bullets 
while serving in France with the marines. 
Doctors cheerfully informed him that, while 
he might live, he would probably be an in- 
valid. To-day Eddie weighs 23 5 pounds, 
walks without a trace of a limp, and you 
should see his agility at the keyboard! 



Morris Landerman, a violinist of the con- 
cert orchestra of Station WTIC of Hartford, 
plays a Nicholas Amati violin, three hundred 
years old. 

"And please don't forget," Morris told a 
newspaper reporter one day, "that mine is a 
genuine Amati violin." 

When the story appeared, it contained no 
mention of the Amati. 

"But I told you that mine is a genuine 
Amati violin," protested Morris. 

"Yes, I know," replied the reporter, %ut 
we can't be giving this guy Amati a lot of 
free advertising." 

Near the end of the broadcast of "Judith" 
by the National Oratorio Society over an NBC 
network recently, Reinald Werrenrath, the 
director, noticed that Theodore Webb, bari- 
tone soloist, was turning red-faced and seemed 
in great difficulty. With one minute to go, 
Webb suddenly stopped, ran over to a far 
corner and let forth a terrific, but muffled, 
cough. The male quartet jumped hastily into 
the breach and carried on to the end. 

Webb later explained that he felt the cough 
coming on, tried to restrain it, but finally gave 
way. A few moments later he went on an- 
other program and sang throughout success- 
fully. 



"Stopping the show," the ambition of every 
stage performer, was accomplished at the age 
of three years by Gladys Rice, now an NIU 
soprano. Little Gladys took part in .1 show 
without the casting director's previous knowl- 
edge. 

It happened when her father, the late John 




' l\enri( 
Robert 




ROY ATWELL'S Tidewater Inn is open at 6:30 p. m. each Monday, Wednesday and Friday. CATHERINE FIELDS, CBS actress, as she appeared in the role of "Gretel." EDWARD 
CULLEN and KENNETH ROBERTS have been duly initiated into the ranks of the CBS "announccrial" staff. 



Page 10 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 



C. Rice, was playing in "A Fool There Was" 
with a stock company. He was the daring 
lover. In the midst of one of those torrid 
love scenes so famous on the stage a few years 
ago, Gladys, who had escaped from the watch- 
ful eyes of her nurse, toddled forth from be- 
hind the wings, ran with outstretched arms to 
her Don Juan father, and cried loudly: 
"Daddy! daddy!" She stopped the show. 



Two men, both attending their lodge's con- 
vention in a strange city, were before the hotel 
clerk, seeking a room. There being only one 
room left, they decided to both occupy it 
(being members of the same lodge). At three 
o'clock in the morning one of them rushed 
out in his pajamas, in too big a hurry to take 
the elevator; he came barefoot down the stairs 
and woke the sleeping night clerk. "Shay, 
hie, you! That man you put in that room 
with me ish crazy! He's, hie, standing up in 
the middle of his bed, yelling, 'There's no lions 
in this room! There's no lions in this room!' 
And, hie, besides that, he's a liar; the room's, 
hie, full of lions!" 



Radio hasn't always followed the well- 
ordered routine prevailing in the studios to- 
day. Raymond Guy, NBC engineer, recalls 
the early days at WJZ, in Newark, the first 
metropolitan broadcasting station. The studio 
occupied part of the ladies' dressing-room on 
the ground floor rear of the Westinghouse fac- 
tory. 

One evening during a program a cat jumped 
through the window. Some one struck at the 
surprised feline, which immediately ran into 
the center of the room. Engineers, artists and 
others abandoned broadcasting and joined the 
chase, which was ended several minutes later 
when pussy escaped, again via the window, 
leaving behind a sadly wrecked broadcasting 
studio. 



Since inmates of Ohio State Penitentiary not 
only are permitted to listen in on radio broad- 
casts, but are allowed to write one letter every 
two weeks, one of them has written all of his 
correspondence for three months to "Mity" 
Ann Leaf, the CBS midnight organist. 

The letters, Miss Leaf informs your column- 
ist, are written in excellent style. Each let- 
ter tells how forty other prisoners are de- 
pendent upon the writer's radio set to hear her 
daily programs. 

Each is signed: 

"Yours and Ohio's 1" 



Douglas Gilbert is new to radio, but faces 
the microphone fearlessly. He dares what few 
old-time broadcasters fear to do. He often 
alters and rewrites as many as ten paragraphs 
of his script five minutes before he goes on the 
air. Yet Gilbert, since he inaugurated the 
"Fortune Builders" programs on CBS, has 
stuttered over only one word. Otherwise he 
has kept an even-speed pace with proper em- 
phasis. Gilbert was born for the microphone. 
His technique is a finished one despite the fact 
that he is a comparative newcomer to the 
realm of radio broadcasting. 



More than a million and a half words, or 
the equivalent of ten novels a year, have been 
broadcast by Ida Bailey Allen over the Co- 
lumbia Broadcasting System since September, 
192 8. Her radio Home-Makers' Club now 
presents twenty-eight programs weekly, with 
an average of seven programs daily except 
Friday. 

Of the programs that are not sponsored by 
commercial organizations, Mrs. Allen has set 
aside periods when she invites prominent peo- 
ple to talk on the morning air. The Five Arts 
program, Ida Bailey Allen's Editorial Page and 
the series "What I Am Trying to Do," are 
some of the features under her guidance which 
have met with national approval. 



Eddie East and Ralph Dumke, known to 
fun-loving radio fans as the Sisters of the 
Skillet, now know where to go when in trou- 
ble, only it doesn't always work. 

A few days ago the two NBC comedians 
were driving along a Long Island road in a 
rented automobile. A tire went flat, and for 



the first time in their careers they found 
themselves confronted with a seriously prac- 
tical problem. A policeman approached and 
reprimanded the pair for not pulling com- 
pletely off the highway. 

"How are we going to get the car off the 
road?" demanded Dumke, speaking in a diction 
saved only for policemen. "The wheel is half 
off and half on." 

"Aw, don't bother me with such problems," 
growled the bluecoat; "write a letter to the 
Sisters of the Skillet. They'll fix it for you." 



"From Sorey to Dean to Deutsch" is a 
phrase that may become radio's paraphrase of 
baseball's "From Tinker to Evers to Chance." 
Vincent Sorey, it seems, was rehearsing his 
orchestra at CBS the other day in his usual 
animated fashion. For, when Sorey plays his 
violin, one sees action. His head sways to 
and fro, and his body weaves about violently. 

It was on one of these upward body surges 
that Vincent released his grasp on the violin. 
Up into the air the fiddle sailed. Announcer 
Louis Dean reached up and deflected it. Emery 
Deutsch, standing at the other end of the 
room, then completed the putout by snatching 
the fiddle from sudden death against the hard 
studio wall. 



In spite of post-office rulings, many curi- 
ously addressed letters have found their way 
into the fan-mail department of the Columbia 
Broadcasting System. 

For instance, Ben Bernie has twice received 
letters addressed: "I Hope You Like It." Ted 
Husing once received one inscribed "Good 
Afternoon, Friends." Countless cards and let- 
ters arrive at WABC bearing the phrase: 
"How Do You Do, Ladies and Gentlemen?" 
for Norman Brokenshire. These are easy ones 
for the postman. It's the mysterious sign 
language on envelopes that mystifies and tor- 
ments the P. O. 



They solved the one that had inscribed on 
it the word "An," followed by a drawing of 
a maple leaf. The letter was promptly de- 
livered to an astonished Ann Leaf. 

Came a letter one day last week. On its 
envelope was the inscription in quotes, "20 
Words." It didn't take the fan-mail depart- 
ment long to deliver it to Arthur Pryor, di- 
rector of the Cremo Military Band. 



Louis A. Witten, guest announcer for Royal 
Poet of the Organ presentations, which will 
resume over CBS this fall, is known to studio 
folk as radio's "daredevil of the air." Witten 
has risked his life several times to present 
spectacular broadcasts from airplanes. In fact, 
he was the first announcer to describe an 
event from the cockpit of an airplane; he and 
Herbert B. Glover, WABC public-events di- 
rector, also took part in the first two-way 
airplane conversation, during which the plane 
was utilized as the studio, and Witten, as mas- 
ter of ceremonies, introduced programs which 
emanated from the studios of CBS stations in 
five different cities. 

Louis Witten 's ambition is to fly the At- 
lantic, giving American radio listeners a mile- 
by-mile description of the flight as he pro- 
gresses. It looks as though you're going to 
hear a lot about this Witten fellow before 
long. Just keep your ear close to the loud- 
speaker and it should prove interesting listen- 



Les Reis, of CBS's Chiclet Chuckles, tells 
the story of a passenger on a Southern train 
who, looking under his berth one morning, 
found one black shoe and one tan. He sum- 
moned the porter. The porter scratched his 
head in bewilderment. 

"Well, if dat don't beat all!" he said. "Dat's 
de second time dis mawnin' dat mistake's hap- 
pened!" 



Overheard in the Chicago Area 



By JOSEPH ATOR 



The Campana "First Nighter" program, a 
dramatic sketch, is back on the air over NBC 
at 7 to 7:30 (C. S. T.), Wednesday. Don 
Ameche and June Meredith play in it. 



"Pabstett Varieties" is a new Columbia pro- 
gram, coming out of Chicago, for the house- 
wives during their working or bridge-playing 
hours. It features a vocal quartet at 2 to 
2:15 (C. S. T.), Tuesday. 



Ponderous Paul Whiteman, changing clothes 
in a dressing-room at the Chicago NBC stu- 
dios, spread his elegant yellow undershirt by 
a window. Studio attaches insist that the 
innocent party who asked who had furnished 
the new curtains put the query in good faith. 



Ted Weems, whose band is a feature on 
WGN, will tell you that he is a direct de- 
scendant of Angus Weymes, the Scot who is 
charged with the invention of the bagpipes. 
You needn't be alarmed. He has none in his 
orchestra. 



Paul Whiteman and his orchestra are play- 
ing at the Edgewatcr Beach Hotel in Chicago 
for the summer, with nightly broadcasts over 
KYW and several chain broadcasts weekly over 
NBC. The regular Sunday afternoon con- 
certs at the hotel give Whiteman a chance to 
put on the air some of the jazz classics which 
have made his orchestra famous. 



A little problem of relationship has arisen 
in the Harold Teen gang of WGN, the Chi- 
cago Tribune station. Eunice Yanke, who 
plays Lillums, takes the part of Mrs. Teen, 
the mother of ten-year-old Josie. Now, Josie, 
who is Irene Wicker, takes the role of Mrs. 
Lovewcll, who is Lillums' mother, thus mak- 
ing herself her own grandmother. It is rather 
complicated, but Blair Walliser, author of the 
script, assures us that it works out that way. 



The feats of heroism which have won the 
coveted Congressional Medal of Honor form 
the subject-matter of the Chevrolet Chron- 
icles, over WBBM from 5:15 to 5:45 p. M. 
(C. S. T. ) on Sunday. The series won't be 
of indefinite length — there aren't so many 
medal winners. 



WBBM should be an easier mark for DX 
tuners remote from Chicago as a result of the 
new transmitter towers which have just been 
put in service at its transmitting station at 
Glenview, thirty miles from the studios in 
the heart of the city. They are 305 feet high, 
the tallest in the middle West, according to 
the station's engineers. 



Six-year-old Dennis Walker, son of a negro 
postal clerk in Chicago, lay close to death in 
a hospital because physicians there had been 
unable to find a subject with blood of the 
right type for a transfusion. His father ap- 
pealed to WGN. Volunteers flocked to the 
hospital. A white man gave the blood which 
saved young Dennis' life. 



Harry Mervis, matinee idol at Chicago's 
Goodman Theatre, which hopes some day to 
rival the Theatre Guild, has as his first radio 
part the character of Salty Sam, an ancient 
seaman in Terry's Treasure Chase, a feature 
for kids sponsored by the Kolynos Company 
over NBC at 3:45 (C. S. T.) on Monday, 
Wednesday and Friday. And Bob White, staff 
announcer, who is no snail with the ladies 
himself, is Pegleg Pete, the piratical villain. 



The WGN minstrel shows which have been 
resumed from the Chicago Tribune station on 
Tuesday and Thursday nights at 8:40 (C. D. 
T.), furnishes as much fun for the cast as it 
does for the radio audience, reports Hank 
Moeller, who is interlocutor for the show. 
Hal Gillis plays the part of Snowflakc Brown 
and sings those popular black-face ditties. 
Both Moeller and Gillis are old minstrel show- 



men. The other members of the troup are 
Tom, Dick and Harry, otherwise known as 
Bud and Gordon Vandover and Marlin Hurt. 



WGN was recently the medium for the 

initiation of eighty-five thousand American 
Legionnaires into Illinois posts. Quin Ryan, 
WGN program director, took the role of the 
chaplain in the ceremony, on which more than 
three hundred thousand members of the Legion 
and its auxiliary listened in at their meetings 
throughout the State. 



Another redskin bites the dust regularly in 
the Red Goose Adventures, a Columbia fea- 
ture for youngsters at 7:30 p. M. (C. S. T.), 
Friday. The principal characters are an old 
plainsman and Indian fighter and his two 
grandchildren, for whom he summons back 
some of the characters of his heroic youth. 
The program is being produced at Columbia's 
Chicago studios, and considerable historical re- 
search has been put into it, both for the sub- 
ject material and for the old songs which are 
used as incidental music. 



"The Girl Reporter," drama of newspaper 
adventures by Alma Sioux Scarberry, news- 
paper woman, and Ted Klein, her actor hus- 
band, has graduated from WENR to the NBC 
chain, at 7:45 (C. S. T.), Tuesday and 
Thursday. Alma Sioux, who gets her middle 
name from her great-grandmother, who was a 
member of that tribe, met Young Skunk and 
No Water, full-blooded Sioux chiefs, at the 
NBC studios in Chicago. They immediately 
elected her a full-fledged member of the tribe. 



These radio entertainers are great for accu- 
racy in the details of their presentations, and 
when Antoine Wallace and Jackie Ford looked 
over the script for "Sally Brown and Her 
Cake Eater" and discovered that it involved 
Sally serving cake, they produced real cake. 
Antoine makes it one week and her partner 
alleges that he turns it out the next. After 
all, he's the fellow that eats it. The program 
is an NBC housewife entertainment feature 
from 10 to 10:15 (C. S. T.), Friday. 



Personally you can have the radio organists. 
But not even the stoutest enemy of what Ash- 
ton Stevens, Chicago newspaper columnist, 
dubs the palsy stop, could object to one of 
the performances of Wilson Doty, staff organ- 
ist at WBBM. He appears on the Ike Walton 
Hour, outdoor program, from 7 to 7:15 (C. 
S. T.), Saturday — and operates an outboard 
motor in a tub of water to give the fishing 
scenes realism. 



The Columbia network broadcasts of the 
Poughkeepsie regatta and the annual Yale- 
Harvard crew race this month will give Ted 
Husing, the chain's premier sports announcer, 
a chance to air his studiously acquired erudi- 
tion on rowing technique. 

Husing, by his own statement, aspires to 
be the experts' favorite announcer in sports 
events. The other fellows can talk about the 
sunset and the crowds. The task he sets him- 
self is to pick out the fine points of the con- 
test, which, in rowing, may be appreciated 
only by the thousand-odd of the millions of 
chain listeners who are old crewmen them- 
selves. 

Last year, before his Poughkeepsie broadcast, 
he spent four days at the training quarters of 
various crews, riding in the coaching launches 
and learning just what makes the wheels go 
round in the well-oiled human mechanism 
which propels the delicately balanced shell. 
Luckily for the busy Ted, his own experience, 
both amateur and professional, makes such in- 
tensive coaching unnecessary for him during 
the baseball and football seasons. 

The Poughkeepsie race will go on Colum- 
bia's affiliated stations at 3:15 (E. S. T.) on 
June 16; the Yale-Harvard race at 5:30 (E. 
S. T.) on June 19. 

Columbia is venturing into another seldom 
broadcast sport this month — polo. Every Sun- 
day at three (E. S. T.) the chain will put on 
broadcasts of matches between high-goal teams 
at the famous Meadowbrook and Sands Point 
Clubs. 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 11 




IONA MULL sings with Dr. Sertoli's Ramblers (erstwhile 
California Ramblers) over NBC each Tuesday and Thursday. 
CLARA, LU and EM have become the 10:30 habit every 
night except Sunday and Monday in thousands of homes. 
PAUL DUMONT, BEN GRAUER and EZRA MAC- 
INTOSH are this month's contribution to your collection 
of pictures of NBC announcers. EUNICE HOWARD is 
an NBC actress heard in many dramatic' features — The Cam- 
pus, Collier's Hour and Radio Playbill, for example. JOHN 
L. FOGARTY, tenor soloist, and GUS HAENSCHEN, 
leader of the Palmolive Orchestra, have long been favorites 
with NBC listeners. 




Page 72 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 




=3Si- 






WESTERN UNION 










Albany, 


N 


Y. 


What's 


ON THE 


Air: 






Your supposition correct, 
tribution gratis. Dedicate 
Russell Frazer. 

J- 


Use 

to 
P. 


con- 
Hugh 

M. 



RIDING THE RADIO WAVES. 

To me the radio is a magician of great skill; 
He takes me from my somber self, transports 

me at will; 
He makes me forget trials I face, troubles that 

I know; 
I find a whole new, glorious world, through 

the magic of radio. 

I like to feel I leave this earth, when I turn 
my dial; 

I seem to float on different waves coming all 
the while. 

I hear great stars, great music; feel historic 
things; 

I feel greater sitting here, than all those old- 
time kings. 

At my elbow I control the greatest of earth's 

men; 
I hear and feel great events, conceived and felt 

by them. 
I conquer at once past and present, the future 

I can see; 
I know that the coming age is a great one for 

you and me. 

I recommend that if you find your friends no 
longer true, 

That if your daily contacts appeal no more 
to you, 

Just turn your dial and embark on the best 
the world e'er gave, 

And you will be a gay and exultant soul, rid- 
ing the radio waves. 
Albany, N. Y. J. P. M. 



"DAYLIGHT SAVING IS BAD" 

Daylight Saving is bad for us, as it is im- 
possible for us to get out to WLW, KMOX, 
WTAM, etc., until about 8 p. m. or later, 
C. S. T., and it will be worse as the weather 
grows warmer. This means that we can't get 
anything before 9 p. m., Eastern Daylight, 
and are missing Barbasol, Lowell Thomas, over 
the Columbia, and other favorite features, 
which grieves me. It was all we could do to 
reach these programs in winter, and now it is 
impossible. Would like to see CBS hook up 
with the KGFK, Moorhead, Minn., as our 
closest CBS station is WCCO, Minneapolis, 
and we can't reach them until about 9 p. M., 
C. S. T. 

Lead, N. D. G. B. 



"BURIED TREASURE" 

You could greatly increase the popularity of 
your magazine if you would offer prizes for 
errors discovered in it. You might make a 
game of it. Such a game would be very easy 
to play, and might some day become the lead- 
ing indoor sport. You evidently work on the 
theory that a mistake, once made, must go 
uncorrected, unless a couple of new errors are 
used for replacement. 

Those of your readers who object to the 
sarcasm written about Lowell Thomas would 
very likely not object to similar sarcasm di- 
rected toward some "pet radio grudge" of 
theirs. I enjoy listening to this gentleman, 
but I do not place him on a pedestal. How- 
ever, there must be a great many people who 
do not care whether Lowell Thomas broadcasts 
or not; and these people certainly have a right 
to express their feeling. 

Your columnist who got out the N. Y. C. 
News for the April issue, must be compliment- 
ed for being so wide awake. In his first para- 
graph he uses the call letters of two stations — 
namely, WALK and WEAR— both long de- 
leted. If he really wants to search for descrip- 
tive call letters, I would be glad to loan him 
a call-book published in 1924. I can picture 



him tearing through such a book with all 
the gusto of one searching for buried treasure. 

Though there is a great deal wrong with 
What's on the Air, I get a great deal of 
pleasure out of it, and have bought it regu- 
larly since it first appeared on the neighbor- 
hood news-stand. 

Philadelphia, Pa. P. W. 



If with yourself you would be fair, 
Buy a copy of What's on the Air, 
Then look for the programs you love best, 
And What's on the Air will do the rest. 

So just draw up your easy chair 

And glance o'er the pages of What's on the 

Air, 
And when you've given it a trial 
You'll find to own one is worth while. 

You'll find your favorites listed there, 
From here and there and everywhere; 
And when you've tried it, you won't doubt it, 
And never more will you do without it. 
Girard, Pa. M. M. 



THE ADVERTISING CREMATORY 

"Canned programs" will in time reduce ra- 
dio broadcasting to the present level of the 
once popular vaudeville stage. Every time I 
hear, "This is an electrical transcription," I 
turn my dial elsewhere, and if, in doing so, 
I unwittingly tune in to another phonograph 
reproduction, I feel as though I had been 
gypped. 

As an illustration as to how radio broad- 
casting can in some cases drive away trade, I 
wish to cite my own experience. The adver- 
tiser does not use "transcriptions," so far as 
I know, but he does something infinitely worse 
in "hogging the dial." By this I mean using 
so many powerful chain stations that their 
broadcasting will overlap on the dial to the 
exclusion of other programs. It is like buying 
the entire issue of a newspaper and using even 
the front page for bold-face advertising. 

For nearly twenty years I smoked a certain 
brand of cigaret which was introduced about 
1909, buying them, not on account of adver- 
tisements, but strictly upon their merit. In 
fact, the past two years I bought them in 
spite of advertising which was an insult to 
the intelligence of the average man. What did 
I care if they were indorsed by 52,648 phy- 
sicians, or if, according to the announcer, they 
are kind to your throat? 

Haven't you noticed how much stronger 
power is used by certain stations comprising 
the red network 
of NBC on a cer- 
tain hour three 
nights a week 
than is used in 
the programs pre- 
ceding and follow- 
ing the one to 
which I refer? 

Isn't it silly for 
the blue network 
of NBC to put on 
a good, non-com- 
mercial program 
and at the same 
time kill it with 
their red network? 
Just try to get a 
good program like 
the Cuckoo Hour 
on Saturday night, 
and, instead, you 
will hear fifty 
thousand watts of 
B. S. Woof and 
his Paralytic 

Stroke Dance Orchestra all over the dial. Toast- 
ing may purify, but in this case it burns me up. 

Munciu, Ind. R. P. M. 



BECAUSE OF DAYLIGHT SAVING 
TIME 

During the past few days I have been miss- 
ing several good programs because of Daylight 
Saving Time. They were both chain and 
non-chain programs. This was because some 
stations use that time and others don't, which 
causes me much confusion. 

Charleston, W. Va. C. A. G. 



MORE "ABIES" 

In your column, "I. Windy City Sidelights," 
in the March (1931) issue of What's on 
the Air, noticed an item there about running 
into Anthony Stanford, the Abie of "Abie's 
Irish Rose." 

This is just to let you know that, like the 
merchant next door, we have "the original 
Abie" of the same play, Hal Shubert, now 
studio manager of KOIL at Council Bluffs and 
Omaha. 

This is not written to disparage Mr. Stan- 
ford, for in the years the play has been go- 
ing there surely must have been more Abies, 
but KOIL claims the distinction of having 
the "original Abie" in its midst. 

Council Bluffs, la. B. A. F. 



JUST CREATE A LITTLE ENERGY 

This letter is in answer to the complaint of 
R. J. D. against electrical transcriptions in 
the April issue of your magazine. He stated 
that many of his friends disliked electrical 
transcriptions, but he failed to take into con- 
sideration the fact that there are thousands 
and thousands of fans who derive considerable 
enjoyment from this type of program. 

Recordings present to us orchestras which 
we would otherwise be unable to hear. They 
enable us to enjoy the efforts of artists who 
can not make personal appearances at the 
broadcasting station. 

I am in favor of a certain amount of elec- 
trical transcriptions and I suggest that R. J. 
D. and any one else who does not like this 
type of entertainment just create a little 
energy and tune their set in on another station. 

St. Louis, Mo. T. K. H. 




"So just draw up your 
o'er the pages 



SUPERFLUOUS $? 

Undoubtedly you receive all sorts of strange 
letters, but after you read this one I am sure 
you will think it the strangest you have ever 
read; but strange 
things happen in 
this day and age, 
as you most prob- 
ably have found 
out. 

Although you 
are a total stran- 
ger to me, I am 
going to ask of 
you a favor. 
"Caramba!" I am 
only twenty -one 
years old, but in- 
tensely interested 
and schooled in 
music. It has been 
•" my entire life- 
work, as I ever 
expect it to be, 
but lack of money, 
"mazuma," kale, 
or whatever you 
may call it, stands 
in my way. 

I own one of 

orchestras in Missouri. 

statement 



easy chair ami glance 
of WOTA." 



I can recall a number of instances where 
visitors in my home have expressed surprise 
at the easy way with which I was able to lo- 
cate any program, and, upon being shown how 
it was done by What's on the Air method, 
there have been many expressions of approval. 

Wilmington, Del. D. R. R. 



the most sensationa 

(Perhaps you have heard such 

thousands of times, but maybe you haven't; 

that is a chance I have to take.) 

Perhaps you know of some one with super- 
fluous money who would like to do mankind 
a favor, would be willing to back us up until 
we get a start on the air. I can promise you the 
surprise of your life when you hear my band; 
they will be a seansation. They are natural- 
born clowns as well as exceptional musicians. 

St. Louis, Mo. W. H. T. 



RADIO ADVERTISING 

Radio listeners are acquiring what might be 
called "radio advertising" ear. It is simply a 
habit to listen through radio advertising. Oc- 
casionally an especially badly managed adver- 
tisement rouses us sufficiently to feel irritated 
about it. We tamely listen to a ham adver- 
tisement after hearing some of the greatest 
music ever written — that occurs in the Ar- 
mour Hour. But I am not making a specific 
attack on any one program. Every person 
can name many such cases. If one went to a 
recital, a ham advertisement in the middle of 
the program would most decidedly be out of 
place. We hive thickened our mental hide so 
that the incongruity is passed unnoticed. 
Nevertheless, the evil is there. 

When a business man sets up a series of 
posters or ads, it is always conspicuous that 
he puts in a large catch title. He knows that 
the average man will not read the entire ad, 
especially in periodicals, and so he places some- 
thing that the reader will be sure of seeing. 
But in radio the listener is forced to hear 
whatever is spoken; there is no skipping a 
page with a cursory glance. Therefore a busi- 
ness man should not make his radio adver- 
tisement much longer than his catch line in 
his ads. 

Sponsors seem to work on the time-old prin- 
ciple of giving the people what they want. 
As if the people are always sure of what they 
want! The whole process of education con- 
sists of giving people a chance to get hold of 
better things and to form habits in their fa- 
vor. Again it must be restated that radio is 
so great an influence that its value must be 
exploited to the full as regards education. 
And if its value can not be brought out by 
business-paid radio, then another way must be 
found — otherwise the radio loses half its use 
to the world. Some say, "Look at the good 
programs offered at the present time." In 
fact, in the May number of WOTA is a let- 
ter listing a whole day's worth of them. 

Chicago, 111. B. L. 



TAKING THE JOY OUT OF HIS 
KOKE. 

After Wednesday, the 18th of March, Coco 
Cola pulled Leonard Joy and his all-string 
orchestra off their program, due to a cut in 
appropriations. 

To my mind, they might just as well dis- 
continue their radio advertising altogether, be- 
cause Mr. Joy and his splendid orchestra have 
made Coco Cola Hour what it is to-day — 
one of the truly great programs of the air. 
I am sure that I am speaking the minds of 
the entire radio audience, when I say that 
we will all be terribly disappointed that such 
action has been taken, as we have all learned 
to look forward to Coco Cola Hour each 
week, with the wonderful music that we 
have been given through the efforts of Mr. 
Joy, as it is something outstanding; out 
of the ordinary, and not just another orches- 
tra to be listened to a minute or so and then 
switch on to something else, for Mr. Joy 
has held his audience through every second 
of the program from start to finish — like Max- 
well House Coffee — "good to the last note." 

St. Petersburg, Fla. F. H. L. 



GREAT ADMIRATION 

It was my privilege to witness one of Phil 
Cook's broadcasts from the studibs of WRC 
during his recent visit to Washington, D. C. 

If most radio performers are as courteous 
and modest as he is, well, it must be a joy to 
studio officials to have them broadcast. One 
incident especially showed what a thoughtful 
person he is. A little chap came to the studio 
all alone just to hear Phil Cook. When we 
were assembling in the studio this little fellow 
placed his chair almost directly beside Mr. 
Cook. The latter said, just before he went on 
the air: "Sonny, you are rather close to this 
microphone, so don't forget and say some- 
thing while I am broadcasting. This is sup- 
posed to be a one-man show and you could 
ruin me." 

There was no annoyance or temperament; 
no request that this chap, who was getting the 
(Continued on page 14) 



June, iy3r 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 13 




CSS PrepariwL" 



A few of the many fair stars of stage and concert 
land who were heard over CBS in May. Helen 
Brown, Helen Gilligan, Grace White and Annette 
Hanshaw will be heard regularly in June. 



^ ■- - •"-.—: 






2'^W 




rvit^j 









KwL 



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b-rae/ 5 







Page 14 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 



TWENTY-SIX REASONS WHY WE RE- 
TURN TO THE OLD PROGRAM 
LISTINGS 

By all means return to your old schedules; 
the May issue is a nightmare! 

Boone, la. A. I. L. 

—2— 

Since your recent arrival in the radio-maga- 
zine world I have looked to you as the "one" 
that gave complete, lucid program announce- 
ments. But I can not find favor with the 
new system of listing in the May issue of 
your magazine. I have taken into consideration 
that your new system would be perfected, but 
it seems to me that there is little latitude left 
you, and the greatest perfection would be 
made in returning to the old. 

Wyoming, O. D. A., Jr. 

—3— 

We can't "raido" without WOTA, but, 
with the changing of time and the book, we 
are losing all the good things on our radio at 
this time. Even a child could find their sta- 
tions and time with the April number. 

Tulsa, Okla. Mr. and Mrs. F. M. 



I never was a shark at puzzles, and this new 
arrangement in the May number takes too 
much time. 

Battle Creek, Mich. F. J. H. 

—5— 

I can not devote my entire time to program 
scanning, as my wife and I enjoy chatting 
with each other through the evening, so I 
want what your April issue offered: a program 
printed clearly, with easily scanned symbols 
and showing all the stations carrying a par- 
ticular program in such a manner as to make 
them speedily available (not alone to the 
graph expert, but to the average man). 

Goshen, Ind. L. W. P. 

—6— 

I have two grandsons in grammar school 
and am frequently called on to help work 
their new-fangled math, problems, but figur- 
ing out your May arrangements of stations, 
time and programs, after hours of concentra- 
tion, still remains a Chinese puzzle. 

Union Springs, Ala. F. B. B. 

—7— 

My May number has just arrived and I am 
horrified at your new programs! 

Oconomowoc, Wis. C. P. 



I hereby object to the new style of listing 
the radio programs, on the grounds that I am 
a permanent reader of your magazine. As 
Andrew Brown would say, "It's a mess now." 

Let's get back to the good, old days and stop 
this new "stunt" stuff. 

Yours till Bill Hay mispronounces a syllable. 

Oklahoma City, Okla. C. F. S. 

—9— 

Just bought your latest copy of WOTA, 
which is the May issue. You ask your friends 
to write you and tell you how they like it. 
All I can say is I'd stop experimenting, if 
this is a sample of the results. To tell the 
truth, I am disgusted and am writing before 
I "cool off." 

Elmira, N. Y. G. H. 

—10— 

Just a word, please, to ask if the person who 
is responsible for the change in style in your 
excellent magazine has since been confined in 
an asylum, and, if not, why not? I had be- 
come quite well acquainted with previous is- 
sues and could pick out what I required quite 
easily, but this one for May has me beaten 
to a finish. 

Ottawa, Ont. E. E. B. 

—11 — 

I think your May issue of What's on the 
Air is a total loss. If a person wants to work 
puzzles, he usually depends on the newspapers 
to furnish them. 

Emporia, Kan. W. P. Y. 

—12— 

I certainly did burn up when I received and 
looked through the May issue. 

York, Pa. S. R. R. 



—13— 

The May issue makes a good crossword 
puzzle. It can be solved, but the program 
lost while doing it. 

Greensboro, N. C. H. S. Battie. 

—14— 

After trying the better part of two weeks 
to figure out just how, when and where to 
find a program in May issue of WOTA, I've 
come to the conclusion that I'd make better 
headway figuring income tax for "Uncle Abe 
and David." It's driving me crazy; so please 
return to the March and April system. 

P. S. — WOTA is a great little magazine, 
and I never miss an opportunity of telling my 
friends about it. 

Louisville, Ky. B. A. 



—15— 

There was a time when I swore by your 
publication, but now I am swearing at it. 
Possibly I am dumb, but I succeeded in solv- 
ing all your previous schemes, but the May 
issue has me "buffaloed." Your magazine filled 
an important niche in the radio world, but, 
alas and alack! how the mighty have fallen! 

Iowa Falls, la. F. E. F. 

—16— 

Have just finished reading the articles in 
your May issue. Keep up the good work in 
that line, but give us a program service it 
doesn't require a Philadelphia lawyer to figure 
out. 

Best wishes for your continued success. 

London, Ont. S. D. 




"1 know many hope you will return to the former system." 



FAN FARE? 

(Continued from page 12) 

thrill of his life, be moved back; just a 
friendly warning that he keep perfectly still, 
and that was all. The boy was almost motion- 
less during the entire broadcast, fully justify- 
ing Phil Cook's confidence that he would make 
no noise. 

I have always thought Phil Cook exceed- 
ingly skillful in giving all of his many voices 
over the air. I left that studio with a feeling 
of great admiration for the man himself. 

Washington, D. C. M. O. B. 



We are having a big argument here, and 
wish your opinion. 

We had Amos 'n' Andy here recently in 
"Check and Double Check," and I made the 
statement that their voices were more natural 
on the radio than in the talkies, and there the 
argument started. I have listened to Amos 
'n' Andy for a long time over the radio, and 
when I heard them in the picture I thought 
their voices sounded mechanical and were re- 
produced voices, but some say that the talkies 
are more natural. Now, what is your idea on 
this? And do you know where I could get 
more information on this subject? 

I have taken your paper for a long time, and 
sure enjoy your fine paper. Keep up the good 
work, but please don't raise the price up in 
these hard times. 

Blockton, la. L. C. 

The talkies are nothing more than 
"electrical transcriptions," or phono- 
graph records made of the voices, 
which removes the original voice two 
degrees from the listener, whereas, 
when you hear "Amos 'n' Andy" over 
the air, you are only one degree re- 
moved from them. 



This is my farthest away American. I have 
also written to KMMJ, KGW and KGBY (or 
KGOY), South Dakota. I have several others 
I haven't managed to get the call yet; local 
noise too bad. 

"I have just been round the dials and heard 
the following Yanks: WENR, WMAQ, WFAA, 
KFI, KPO, KTM, KGO, KHJ, KFOX, 
KGER, KGMB and three others. It's fairly 
easy to get the ones I have already logged, but 
new ones — well, that's a different matter. Take 
KTM: I understand there are about eight or 
nine stations on the same wavelength. Are 
they all off the air when KTM is on, or what 
happens, as I can not get any of them? 

"I have never managed to hear a Canadian 
on the broadcast band, and I have tried quite 
a lot; but there are quite a few listeners in 
the North Island who have verifications from 
them. 

"What I would like is to get a letter from 
every State, but I am beginning to think that 
it is next to impossible, unless I shift out of 
Christchurch. I have letters from California, 
Colorado, Illinois, Louisiana, Ohio, New York, 
Oklahoma, Texas, Utah, Washington, Mis- 
souri, Oregon. 

"How's your little 'din-box' going? 
"Cheerio, 

"Christchurch, N. Z. W. G. S." 



I had occasion to recommend that our Pas- 
senger Department use your magazine in our 
Coach Club and Pullman Club lounge cars of 
our trains. Because of the May issue and the 
manner in which you have changed the chart- 
ing of your stations, I have withdrawn the 
recommendation. 

And, finally, I would rather listen to a good 
phonograph program from Station KWKH, 
"W. K. Henderson speaking," than a lot of 
the claptrap and rubbish that come from the 
straight broadcasts of the advertising head- 
quarters maintained in the guise of an amuse- 
ment program. 

Chicago, 111. S. M. W. 



I am enclosing part of a letter I received 
from W. G. S., of Christchurch, N. Z., writ- 
ten February 20, that might be of interest to 
WOTA: 

"Hello! Here I am again. We are still 
doing a bit of a shiver; I think mother earth 
is gone jazz mad. We in Ch.Ch. are getting 
off light, the shocks here are just strong 
enough to wake one up; no damage done, just 
stopped the city clock several times. 

"I listened to WTIC for the first time a 
few nights ago; came in at good speaker 
strength in daylight. I listened for about an 
hour; it was their sixth anniversary program. 



"MAKING A LIAR OUT OF THEIR 
CLOCK" 

Whoever is responsible for putting radio on 
Daylight Saving Time surely "mussed things 
up." Just because a few antiquated cities in 
the East insist upon adhering to this obsolete 
custom by making a liar out of their clock, 
instead of getting up an hour earlier if they 
want to (which would be very commendable), 
why throw all the remainder of the country 
into dire confusion? 

Daylight Saving Time would appear to be 
no more practical for radio than for the rail- 
roads. 

Boone, la. A. I. L. 



—17— 

Your Vol. II., No. 7 issue for May, 193 1 : 
having the geographic puzzle arrangement for 
locating programs is interesting, but the pro- 
grams are more difficult to locate. 

Topeka, Kan. D. C. D. 

—18— 

This May program is worse than learning 
anatomy, and that is saying something. In the 
February, March and April issues I had got 
quite cocky over my ability to find just what 
I wanted at any time over my radio. Now, 
with the May number, I am lost. 

Savannah, Ga. E. B. H. 

—19— 

I wish to compliment whoever is responsible 
for the radical change in the form of your 
magazine, for I do not believe there is another 
person in the world who could so completely 
wreck a good magazine in one issue. The 
unanimous opinion of every one of my cus- 
tomers is that you have made the magazine a 
"flat tire." No one cares for a map of the 
United States. One shouldn't have to be a 
civil engineer or surveyor to find a radio pro- 
gram. 

The only way I could sell any more sub- 
scriptions would be for me to open up a free 
school teaching, "How to Read What's on 
the Air." Every time I see one of my cus- 
tomers coming down the street I run and hide. 

Aberdeen, S. D. J. P. 

—20— 

I am a woman, sixty years of age, and have 
solved many difficult problems in my life. I 
am also a college graduate and have always 
rather prided myself on the fact that I have 
more than the average intelligence, but I must 
admit that your May issue of What's on the 
Air is too much for me. 

Galesburg, 111. H. F. A. 



-21- 



Your May issue excels even itself in lunacy, 
at least so far as the radio program is con- 
cerned. 

Winnipeg, Man. A. J. 

—22— 

The magazine you have just printed (May) 
is Latin to all of us. 

Milledgeville, 111. M. A. A. 

—23— 

When I opened the magazine for May, I 
expected to find the sensible arrangement used 
formerly, but only in a nightmare would I 
expect to ever get such another shock! 

Sault Ste. Marie, Ont. J. O. C. 

—24— 

Whoever invented the May program system 
must have had a severe brain-storm first. 
Please give us the old style. 

Winthrop Harbor, 111. A. H. O. 

—25— 

Have tried faithfully to get the hang of 
the most recent change of program listing in 
the May number and have succeeded only in 
spraining a brain. 

Oswego, Kan. R. E. L. 

—26— 

Made up in the old form, as the April issue, 
my family could wear out two copies each 
month, so constant were the references made 
to it. I find the old copies were marked and 
underscored, dog-eared and finger-printed. 
The new May issue has hardly been touched 
the second day after it came in the house. It 
is simply of little practical use; that is, the 
station-program schedules are not there. Yes- 
terday the following persons expressed the same 
opinion to me: a captain of the army, quarter- 
master here; a clerk in the civil service; a 
Methodist pastor; a real-estate title investiga- 
tor; a high-school student — rather a represen- 
tative group and all radio enthusiasts and 
readers of your magazine. Every person whom 
I have heard express an opinion has been at 
an utter loss to explain why the change was 
ever even seriously contemplated. 

I know many hope you will return to the 
former system. 

Fort Clark, Tex. J. MacW. 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 15 



OTfqY" 



A. O. COGGESHALL, studio 
manager; WINSLOW LEIGH- 
TON, commercial manager; 
CLYDE S. KITTELL, program 
director; ROLAND BRADLEY, 
continuity, and the announcers 
at old WGY. Below is pictured 
WGY's thyratron organ — a 
prophecy of new wonders yet to 
be realized in the field of music. 





ieonexrcL J. Balnea 



o/KD.Co^eskail 



Clyde Midi 




Ethel (Dsterhout Mrren Munson, 



Four artists of WLW and one of WKRC, Cincinnati, 
are pictured in the lower group on this page. 

HENRY THIES, of the WLW staff, and his orchestra 
are now heard Sunday nights on a coast-to-coast NBC 
network. ARTHUR CHANDLER, Jr., is the WLW 
organist who is often heard on Crosley Concerts. 
JOSEPHINE MECA, soprano, comes from the concert 



Roland Bradley James Y. Cornell 




\ 

c/frthur , 

Chandler 

Jr. 



Page 16 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 



Daytime Chain Programs 

HEARD OVER EXTENDED NETWORKS 

All Times given on this page are Eastern Daylight. Subtract one hour for Eastern Standard or 
Central Daylight; two hours for Central Standard; three hours for Mountain Standard 



Radio Home-Makers, CBS, Monday, Tuesday, 
Wednesday and Thursday, 10:30 A. M. to 
Noon — WABC, W2XE, WKBW, WCAU, 
W3XAU, WJAS, WMAL, WCAO, WSPD, 
KMOX, KOIL, WPG, WLBW, WDBJ, 
WADC, WWNC, WBT, WBCM, WDOD, 
WREC, WLAC, WISN, WTAQ, KSCJ, 
KMBC, KPJF, CPRB, WHEC, WDRC, 
WHP, WAIU. 

1 

Old Dutch Girl, CBS, Monday, Wednesday 
and Friday, 9:45 A. M. — WABC, W2XE, 
WPBL, WKBW, WEAN, WNAG, WCAU, 
W3XAU, WJAS, WMAL, WCAO, WTAR, 
WADC, WHK, WKRC, WBT, WGST, 
WXYZ, WSPD, WREC, WLAC, WBRC, 
WDSU, WISN, WOWO, WBBM, WCCO, 
KMOX, KMBC, KOIL, KFH, KFJP, 
KRLD, KTSA, KLZ, KDYL, CFRB, CKAC. 

< 

Dale Wimhrow, CBS, Monday, Thursday and 
Saturday, 2 P. M. — WABC, W2XE, WPG, 
WCAU, W3XAU, WJAS, WMAL, WCAO, 
WTAR, WADC, WWNC, WBT, WDOD, 
WREC, WLAC, WBRC, CFRB. 

1 

The Three Doctors, CBS, Tuesday, Wednes- 
day and Thursday, 3:30 P. M. — WABC, 
W2XE, WGR, WORC, WPG, WCAU, 
W3XAU, WHP, WMAL, WCAO, WTAR, 
WDBJ, WADC, WHK, WAIU, WWNC, 
WBT, WBCM, AVSPD, WDOD, WREC, 
WLAC, WBRC, WISN, WTAQ, WFBM, 
WMAQ, WCCO, KSCJ, WMT, KMOX, 
KMBC, KFH, KFJF, KTSA, KLZ, KDYL, 
KFPY, CFRB, KOIL, KHJ. 

Ann Leaf at the Organ, CBS, Wednesday and 
Friday, 2:30 P. M.; Monday, 3:30 P. M., 
and Saturday, 4 P. M. — WABC, W2XE, 
WHEC, WGR, WPG, WCAU, W3XAU, 
WHP, WMAL, WCAO, WTAR, WDBJ, 
WADC, WHK, WWNC, WBT, WBCM, 
WSPD, WDOD, WLAC, WBRC, WTAQ, 
KSCJ, KMOX, KOIL, KFJF, KLZ, KFPY, 
CFRB, WREC, KRLD. 

Gene and Glenn, NBC (daily except Sunday), 

8 A. M. — WTAM, WEAF, WJAR, WTAG, 
WEEI, WCSH, WFI, WRC, WGY, WCAE, 
WWJ, WSAI, WRVA, WPTF, CKGW, 
WJAX, WIOD, WFLA, WSUN, CFCF, 
WBEN, WTIC. 

Gene and Glenn, NBC (daily except Sunday), 

9 A. M. — WOC, WDAF, KSTP, WOAI, 
WFAA, WGN, WHO, WTMJ, WOW, 
WEBC, WHAS, WSB, WKY, WSM, WMC, 
WAPI, WSMB, WJDX, KVOO, KPRC, 
WDAY, KFYR. 

Cheerio, NBC (daily except Sunday), 8:30 
A. M. — WEAF, WTIC, WEEI, WCAE, 
WRC, WCKY, WJAR, WFLA, WSUN, 
KSTP, WFI, WTAG, WWJ, WCSH, WOW, 
WDAF, WAPI, CKGW, WKY, KPRC, 
WBEN, WJAX, WOAI, WPTF, WIOD, 
WHAS, WTAM, WIBO, WSM, WMC, 
WSB, WJDX, WDAY. 

Radio Household Institute (daily except Fri- 
day and Sunday), 11:15 A. M. — WEAF, 
WWJ, WEEI, WBEN, KSTP, WTIC, 
WJAR, WCSH, WLIT, WRC, WGY, 
WCAE, WSAI, KFKX, KSD, WTAM, 
WOAI, WMC, KTHS, WTAG, WOC, WHO, 
WTMJ, WEBC, WHAS, WSM, WSB, 
WAPI, WSMB, KVOO, KPRC, WOW. 

A. & P. Program (talk to housewives; daily 
except Sunday), 9:45 A. M. — WEAF, 
WTIC, WJAR, WTAG, WCSH, WRC, 
WGY, WCAE, WTAM, WWJ, WOC, KSD, 
WHO, WDAF, WTMJ, WEBC, WRVA, 
WPTF, WIOD, WFLA, WSUN, WHAS, 
WSM, WMC, WSB, WSMB, WJDX, 
KVOO, WOAI, WKY, WBEN, WFI, KSTP, 
WIBO, WGN, WOW, KPRC, WEEI, 
WFAA. 

National Farm and Home Hour, NBC (daily 
except Sunday), 1:30 P. M. — WJZ, 
WHAM, WJR, KSTP, WRVA, WHAS, 
WEBC, WAPI, WOW, WMC, KVOO, WKY, 
WOAI, WRC, WGAR, WHO, WDAF, 
WJDX, WBAL, WSB, KWK, KOA, WBZ, 
WBZA, WOC, KTHS, WFLA, WSUN, 
WSM, WJAX, KFAB, KPRC, KDKA, 
WLW, WPTF, WSM, WDAY, KFYR, 
KYW, WREN, KFKX, WSMB, WFAA. 

Edna Wallace Hopper, NBC, Tuesday and 
Thursday, 3:45 P. M. — WJZ, WBAL, 
WHAM, KDKA, WGAR, WJR, WLW, 
KWK, WREN, KFAB, CKGW, KSTP, 
WEBC, WRVA, WPTF, KTAR, WJAX, 
WIOD, WFLA, WSUN, WHAS, WSM, 
WSB, KECA, KGO, KGW, KOMO, KHQ, 
KOA, KSL, KFSD, KTHS, CFCF, WDAY, 
KFYR, WCFL, WMC, WAPI, WSMB, 
WJDX. 

Women's Radio Review, NBC (daily except 
Saturday and Sunday), 3 P. M. — WEAF, 
WTIC, WEEI, WJAR, WTAG, WCSH, 
WFI, WRC, WGY, WBEN, WCAE, WTAM, 
WWJ, WSM, KYW, WOC, WHO, WOW, 
KSD, WDAF. 

son, NBC, Tuesday and 
. M. — WJZ, WBZ, WBZA, 
KDKA, WCKY, WIBO, 
WTMJ, WSM, KSTP, 
WJAX, WIOD, WHAS, 
WSMB, KTHS, KVOO, 
WOAI, WKY, 
WJR, KDKA, 



Betty Crocker, NBC, Wednesday and Friday, 
10:30 A. M. — WEAF, WTIC, WJAR, 
WTAG, WCSH, WFI, WRC, WGY, WSAI, 
WTAM, KFKX, WBEN, WJAX, WOAI, 
WRVA, WEEI, WWJ, WIOD, WPTF, 
WKY, WBAP, KPRC, KVOO, WDAF, 
WCAE. 

U. S. Service Bands, NBC, 11:30 A. M., 
Tuesday (WEAF-split network); 11:30 
A. M., Wednesday (WJZ-split network) ; 
10:30 A. M., Thursday (WJZ-split net- 
work); 10:15 A. M., Friday (service to 
WJZ). 

Libby, McNeil & Libby (Ray Perkins), NBC, 
10 A. M., Friday and Thursday. — Station 
list for Friday: WJZ, WBZ, WBZA, 
WHAM, WIBO, WLW, KDKA, WREN, 
KWK, WGAR, WBAL, KFAB, WRVA, 
WPTF, WJAX, WIOD, WFLA, WSUN, 
WHAS, WSB, WJDX, WSMB, KVOO, 
WBAP, KPRC, WOAI, KOA, WTMJ, 
WAPI, KSTP, WJR. (Only the first 12 
of above stations used on Thursday.) 

SUNDAY 

10:15 A. M. — Land o' Make Believe (chil- 
dren's playlet). — WHEC, WPG, WHP, 
WJAS, WCAO, WDBJ, WHK, WAIU, 
WWNC, WBT, WBCM, WDOD, WREC, 
WLAC, WDSU, WTAQ, WFBM, WBBM, 
WMT, KMBC, WNAX, KFH, KFJF, 
KDYL, WISN. 

11:30 A. M. — Rochester Concert Orchestra 
(direction, Sherman A. Clute) . — NBC ser- 
vice from WHAH to WJZ, WBAL, WHAM, 
WGAR, WLW, WSM, WMC, KDKA, 
WREN, KFAB, WTMJ, WEBC, WPTF, 
WJAX, WFLA, WSUN, WHAS, WRC, 
WIOD, KGO, KECA, KGW, KOMO, KFSD, 
WAPI, WSMB, WFAA, WKY, KOA, 
WENR. 

12:30 P. M. — National Oratorio Society — 
"Judith," Part II. (direction, Reinald Wer- 
renrath). — NBC service to WEAF, WTIC, 
WCSH, WRC, WGY, WCAE, WTAM, 
WDAY, KFYR, WOC, WHO, WDAF, 
WTMJ, CKGW, WEBC, KSTP, WHAS, 
KPO, KOA, KOMO, KGO, CFCF, KGW, 
WEEI, WJAR, WWJ, KECA. 



12:30 P. M. — Troika Bells (Russian ensem- 
ble; direction, Alexander Kirilloff). — NBC 
service to WJZ, WBAL, WHAM, KWK, 
WGAR, KDKA, WLW, KOA, KECA, 
KFSD, KFAB, WCAE, KGO, KPO, WBZ, 
WBZA, WREN, WTMJ, WEBC, WPTF, 
WHAS, WFLA, WSUN, WSM, WSMB, 
KTAR, WKY, KGW, KOMO. 

1:30 P. M. — Little Jack Little (songs and 
patter). — NBC service to WJZ, WREN, 
KFAB, WGAR, WLW, WJR. 

1:45 P. M. — Deems Taylor NBC Musical 
Series. — NBC service to WEAF, WJZ, 
WBAL, WTIC, KSTP, WIOD, KDKA, 
WCAE, KOA, KECA, KGW, KFAB, 
WRVA, WETI, WJAR, WTAG, WCSH, 
WRC, WGY, WTAM, WWJ, WSAI, KYW, 
WOC, WHO, KFYR, WFLA, WSUN, 
WHAS, WSB, WJDX, WKY, WDAF, 
WEBC, WPTF, WSM, WAPI, WSMB, 
KVOO, WBZ, WBZA, WGAR, KWK, KSL, 
WDAY, KFSD, WBEN, WLW, KGO. 

WJZ, WEAF, WBAL, KSTP, WIOD, 
WEBC, KWK, KOA, KSL, KECA, KGW, 
KDKA, KFAB, WRVA, KVOO, WEEI, 
WTIC, WTAG, WGAR, WCSH, WCAE, 
WTAM, WWJ, WRC, WGY, WBEN, 
WSAI, KGW, WOC, WHO, WDAF, KFYR, 
WPTF, WFLA, WSUN, WHAS, WSM, 
WSB, WAPI, WJAR, WSMB, WJDX, 
WKY, WBZ, WBZA, KFSD, WDAY, WLW, 
KGO. 

2:30 P. M. — Yeast Foamers (Lee Sims, pian- 
ist; Ilo May Bailey, soprano; orchestra 
direction, Herbie Kay). — NBC service, Chi- 
cago studios, to WJZ, WBAL, WBZ, 
WBZA, WGAR, WJR, WLW, KDKA, 
KYW, KWK, WREN, KFAB, WTMJ, 
KSTP, WEBC, WRVA, WPTF, WIOD, 
WFLA, WSUN, WJAX, WHAS, WSM, 
WMC, WSB, WAPI, WJDX, WSMB, 
KTHS, KVOO, WFAA, WKY, WOAI, KOA, 
KSL, KPO, KECA, KGW, KHQ, KTAR, 
KFSD, KOMO. 

3:00 P. M. — Moonshine and Honeysuckle 
(mountaineer sketch). — NBC service to 
WEAF, WTIC, WEEI, WJAR, WTAG, 
WLIT, WRC, WTAM, WWJ, KYW, KSD, 
WOC, WGY, WBEN, WHO, WDAF, WOW, 
CFCF. 

3:00 P. M. — National Youth Conference — 
Dr. Daniel A. Poling. Male chorus and 
orchestra direction, George Shackley; an- 
nouncer, Marley R. Sherris. — NBC service 
to WJZ, WBAL, KDKA, KWK, WREN, 
KFAB, WRVA, WJAX, WIOD, KVOO, 
WOA-, WFLA, WSUN, KGW, WPTF, 
KGO, KOA, KSTP, WEBC, WSMB, KPRC, 
WKY, KOMO, KHQ, WSB, WAPI, WGAR, 
WTMJ, KSL, WDAY, WJDX, WSM 
(KTHS off 3:30). 



Index to Major Evening Programs 



Josephine 


B. Gib 


Friday, 


10:45 A. 


WBAL, 


WHAM, 


KWK, 


WREN, 


WEBC, 


WRVA, 


WMC, 


WAPI, 


WBAP, 


KPRC, 


WPTF, 


WSB, 


WSUN. 





WJDX, 
WFLA, 



Atwater Kent Program, NBC, Sun. 9. 

Around the Samovar, CBS, Sun. 11:30. 

Ann Leaf, CBS, Sun., Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. (Sat. 4), 12:30. 
Amos 'n' Andy, NBC, Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7 and 11. 
An Evening in Paris, CBS, Mon. 9:30. 
Adventures of Sherlock Holmes, NBC, Mon. 

10. 
Adventures in Words, CBS, Tues. 5. 
Adventures of Polly Preston, NBC, Tues. 

8:45. 
Arabesque, CBS, Wed. 9:30. 
Armour Program, NBC, Fri. 9:30. 
Armstrong Quakers, NBC, Fri. 10. 
Anheuser-Busch, CBS, Sat. 10:30. 

Black and Gold Room Orchestra, NBC, Mon., 
Tues., Wed., Sat. 6; Thurs. 6:30; Fri. 
6:15. 

Blackstone Plantation, NBC, Tues. 8; Thurs.. 
9. 

Boswell Sisters, NBC, Tues., Fri. 10:30. 

Cities Service Concert, NBC, Fri. 8. 
Cadman, Dr. S. Parkes, NBC, Sun. 4. 
Cathedral Hour, CBS, Sun. 4. 
Catholic Hour, NBC, Sun. 6. 
Chase and Sanborn, NBC, Sun. 8. 
Collier's Radio Hour, NBC, Sun. 8:15. 
Coty Playgirl, CBS, Sun. 9. 
Camel Quarter-hour, CBS, Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 7:45 and 11:30. 
Chesebrough Real Folks, NBC, Mon. 9:30. 
Cuckoo, NBC, Sat. 10. 
Clara, Lu and Em, NBC, Tues., Wed., Thurs., 

Fri., Sat. 10:30. 
Canadian Musical Crusaders, NBC, Wed. 8:30. 
Clicquot Club, NBC, Fri. 9. 
Columbia Educational Features, CBS, Sat. 

9:30. 

Daddy and Rollo, CBS, Sun., Tues., Thurs., 

7:30. 
Devils, Drugs and Doctors, CBS, Sun. 8. 
Dodge Twins, CBS, Mon., Fri. 5:30. 
Death Valley Days, NBC, Tues. 9:30. 
Detective Story Magazine, CBS, Thurs. 9:30. 
Dutch Masters, CBS, Fri. 8:30. 

Enna Jettick Melodies, NBC, Sun. 8. 

Eno Crime Club, CBS, Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 6:45. 
Empire Builders, NBC, Mon. 10:30. 

Famous Trials in History, NBC, Sun. 10. 
Floyd Gibbons, CBS, Sun. 10. 
Florsheim Frolic, NBC, Tues. 8:30. 

Geneial Electric Hour, NBC, Sat. 9. 
Graham Paige Hour, CBS, Sun. 9:30. 
Graybar's Mr. and Mrs., CBS, Tues. 10. 
Ge:ie Austin, NBC, Wed., Sat. 7; Thurs. 11. 

Harbor Lights, NBC, Sat. 9. 

Henry Burbig, CBS, Sat. 8:15. 

Henrv George, CBS, Tues. 9. 

Hamilton Watchman, CBS, Thurs. 8:45. 

Hank Simmons' Showboat, CBS, Sat. 10. 

Interwoven Pair, NBC, Fri. 9. 



Jack Frost Melody Moments, NBC, Thurs. 
9:30. 

Kate Smith, CBS, Mon. 7:15; Wed., Thurs., 

Fri., Sat. 7. 
Kodak Week-end Hour, NBC, Fri. 10. 

Little Orphan Annie, NBC, Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 5:30. 
Lowell Thomas, NBC, Mon., Tues. (Wed. 

6:45 only), Thurs., Fri., Sat. 6:45 and 

11:15. 
Landt Trio and White, NBC, Tues., Fri. 8:30. 
Lucky Strike Orchestra, NBC, Tues., Thurs., 

Sat. 10. 
Lutheran Hour, CBS, Thurs. 10. 
Light Opera Gems, CBS, Fri. 5. 
Little Jack Little, NBC, Sat. 11:30. 

Mormon Tabernacle Choir, NBC, Mon. 6:15. 
Midweek Federation Hymn Sing, NBC, 

Thurs. 7. 
Maxwell House Ensemble, NBC, Thurs. 9:30. 
Major Bowe's Family, NBC, Fri. 7. 
March of Time, CBS, Fri. 10:30. 

National Vespers, NBC, Sun. 5. 
Nestles' Program, NBC, Fri. 8. 

Our Government, NBC, Sun. 9. 

Phil Cook, NBC, Mon., Tues., Wed., Thurs., 

Fri. 7:30. 
Pryor's Cremo Band, CBS, Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 8 and 11:15. 
Paul Whiteman, NBC, Mon. 12; Tues. 8; 

Fri., Sat. 12. 
Philco Symphonv Concert, CBS, Tues. 9:30. 
Palmolive Hour, NBC, Wed. 9:30. 

RCA-Victor, NBC, Sun. 7:30. 

Rudy Vallee, NBC, Sun. 7; Thurs. 8. 

Russian Cathedral Choir, NBC, Sun. 11:30. 

Roxy Symphony Concert, NBC, Mon. 7:45. 

Robert Burns Panatela, CBS, Mon. 10. 

Radio Guild, NBC, Fri. 4:15. 

RKO Theatre of the Air, NBC, Fri. 10:30. 

Sunday at Seth Parkers, NBC, Sun. 10:30. 
Slumber Music, NBC, Sun. 10:30; Mon., 

Tues., Wed., Thurs., Fri., Sat. 11. 
South Sea Islanders, NBC, Sun. 12. 
Stromberg Carlson Program, NBC, Mon. 10. 
Symphony Rhythm-makers, NBC, Mon. 10:30. 
Snoop and Peep, NBC, Tues. 11. 

Ted Husing Sportslants, CBS, Sat. 6. 

True Story Hour, CBS, Fri. 9. 

Tastyeast Gloom-chasers, CBS, Sun., Mon. 

8:45. 
Three Doctors, CBS, Mon., Tues., Wed., 

Thurs., Fri., Sat. 8. 

Vitality Personalities, CBS, Wed. 10. 
Van Heusen Program, CBS, Fri. 10. 

Westinghouse Salute, NBC, Sun. 9:30. 
Weber and Fields, NBC, Mon. 8:15. 
Wallace Silversmiths, CBS, Sat. 8:30. 



3:00 P. M.- — Symphonic Hour, with Toscha 
Seidel. — WABC, W2XE, WHEC, WKBW, 
WCAU, W3XAU, WHP, WJAS, WMAL, 
WCOA, WTAR, WDBJ, WADC, WAIU, 
WWNC, WBT, WBCM, WDOD, WREC, 
WLAC, WBRC, WDSU, WISN, WTAQ, 
WFBM, WMAQ, WCCO, KSCJ, WMT, 
KMBC, KOIL, KFH, KFJF, KRLD, KTSA, 
WACO, KLZ, KFPY, CFRB. 

MONDAY 

2:45 P. M. — Piano Moods (Lee Sims). — 
WJZ, WGAR, WJR, KWK. WREN, CKGW, 
KSTP, WDAY, WRVA, WPTF, WJAX, 
WBAL, WHAM, WFLA, WMC, WSUN, 
WSB, WAPI, KPRC, WKY. 

TUESDAY 

10:00 A. M. — The Pilgrims. — NBC service 
to WEAF, WFI, WRC, WBEN, WOW, 
WCAE, WTAM, WSM, KSD, WOC, WHO, 
WRVA, WFLA, WSUN, WJDX, KOA, 
WSB, KVOO, WAPI, WHAS, WMC. 

3:00 P. M. — "Music in the Air." — NBC ser- 
vice to WJZ, WBZ, WBZA, WHAM, 
KDKA, WJDX, WLW, WJR, WGAR, WRC, 
WREN, KFAB, CKGW, WEBC, WRVA, 
WPTF, WFLA, WSUN, WAPI, WSMB, 
KWK, WCFL, WMC, WBAL, WDAY, 
WSB, WBAP, WJAX, KVOO, WKY. 

WEDNESDAY 

10:00 A. M. — Mary Hale Martin's Household 
Period. — NBC to WJZ, WBAL, WIBO, 
KDKA, KWK, WREN, WJDX, WJR, 
WHAS, WSMB, KFAB, WSM, WMC, WSB, 
WBZ, WBZA, WLW, WGAR, WHAM, 
WAPI, KSTP, WEBC. 

THURSDAY 

10:45 A. M. — Barbara Gould Beauty Talk 
(announcer, David Ross). — WABC, W2XE, 

WFBL, WHEC, WKBW, WEAN, WNAC, 

WCAU, W3XAU, WJAS, WMAL, WCAO, 

WADC, WKRC, WBT, WGST, WXYZ, 

WSPD, WDSU, WOWO, WBBM, WCCO, 

KMOX, KOIL, KRLD. 

FRIDAY 

10:15 A. M. — Bond Bread Program (Frank 
Crumit and Julia Sanderson; announcer, 

Tom Breen). — WABC, W2XE, WFBL, 

WHEC, WGR, WEAN, WDRC, WNAC, 

WORC, WCAU, W3XAU, WMAL, WCAO, 

WTAR, WADC, WXYZ, WSPD, WDSU, 

KMOX, KMBC, KOIL, KFH, KFJF, 
WWVA, WOKO, WAIU. 

11:00 A. M. — Emily Post (Hints on Eti- 
quette). — WABC, W2XE, WFBL, WKBW, 
WEAN, WDRC, WNAC, WCAU, W3XAU, 
WJAS, WMAL, WCAO, WADC, WHK, 
WKRC, WXYZ, WSPD, WOWO, WBBM, 
KMOX, KMBC, KOIL, CFRB, WISN. 



11:15 A. M. — Winifred 
Travelogues) . — WABC, 
WHEC, WKBW, WEAN, 
WCAU, W3XAU, WHP, 
WCAO, WTAR, WDBJ, 
WKRC, WAIU, WWNC 
WTOC, WQAM, WDBO, 
WSPD, WDOD, WREC, 
WDSU, WISN, WOWO, 
KMOX, KMBC, KOIL, 
KTRH, KTSA, CFRB. 



Carter 


(Cooking 


W2XE. 


WFBL, 


WDRC, 


WNAC, 


WJAS, 


WMAL, 


WADC 


WHK, 


, WBT, 


WGST, 


WDAE, 


WXYZ, 


WLAC, 


WBRC, 


WBBM, 


WCCO, 


KFJF, 


KRLD, 



11:30 A. 
Sense 
WFBL, 
WCAU, 
WCAO, 
WKRC, 
WTOC, 
WSPD, 
WDSU, 
KMBC, 
KTSA, 



M. — Mrs. John R. 

for Mothers). — 

WKBW, WEAN, 

W3XAU, WHP, 

WTAR, WDBJ, 

WAIU, WWNC, 

WQAM, WDBO, 

WDOD, WREC, 

WISN, WOWO, 

KOIL, KFJF, 

CFRB. 



Reilly (Common 

WABC, W2XE, 

WDRC, WNAC, 

WJAS. WMAL, 

WADC, AVHK, 

WBT, WGST, 

WDAE, WXYZ, 

WLAC, WBRC, 

WBBM, KMOX, 

KRLD, KTRH, 



4:15 P. M. — Radio Guild (dramatization).-— 

NBC service to WJZ, WBAL, WHAM, 
WRC, WPTF, WJAX, KGO, KFAB, KSTP, 
WEBC, WSM, WMC, WREN, KSL, KOA, 
WJR, WGAR, WLW, WSB, KVOO, WOAI, 
WHAS, WKY, KPRC, WRVA, WJDX, 
CKGW, WDAY. 

SATURDAY 

10:15 A. M. — Emily Post (talk). — NBC ser- 
vice to WEAF, WEEI, WJAR, WTAG, 
WCSH, WFI, WRC, WGY, WCAE, WWJ, 
WSAI, KYW, WOW, WTAM, WBEN, 
KSD. 

11:00 A. M. — Sisters of the Skillet (comedy 
songs and patter) . — NBC service. Chicago 
studios, to WEAF, WEEI, WJAR, WTAG, 
WRC, WCSH, WFI, WGY, WCAE, WWJ, 
WSAI, KYW, WHO, KSD, WOC, WDAF, 
WTAM, 'WBEN. 

11:00 A. M. — Adventures of Helen and Mary 
(children's hour; announcer, John Mayo). 
— WABC, W2XE, WHEC, WKBW, WORC, 
WPG, WCAU, W3XAU, WJAS, WLBW, 
WMAL, WCAO, WDBJ, WADC, WHK, 
WAIU, WWNC, WBT, WBCM, WSPD, 
WDOD, WREC, WLAC, WISN, WTAQ, 
KSCJ, KMOX, KMBC, KOIL, KFJF, 
KDYL, CFRB. 

11:30 A. M. — Keys to Happiness (piano les- 
sons; direction, Sigmund Spaeth; Alois 
Havrilla, narrator).- — NBC service to 
WEAF, WEEI, WJAR, WTAG, WCSH, 
WLIT, WRC, WBEN, WCAE, WTAM, 
WWJ, WOAI, KFKX, KSTP, CKGW, 
WRVA, WFLA, WSUN, WHAS, WSM, 
WAPI, WSMB, KJDX, KVOO, WKY, 
CFCF, WTMJ, WEBC, WPTF, KOA, KSD, 
WDAF, WDAY, KFYR, WFAA, WTIC, 
WGY, WIOD, KTHS. 

2:45 P. M. — Sisters of the Skillet (Edward 
East and Ralph Dumke; specialty songs 
and dialogue). — NBC service, Chicago stu- 
dios, to WJZ, WBAL, WLW, KYW. 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 17 







Few broadcasting stations have failed to 
develop at least one juvenile artist worthy 
of general hearing, but, with the excep- 
tion of WCKY's amazing little singer, 
we confine our page this month to pic- 
tures of children who are familiar to you 
through months of work over the chains. 





I Eddie and 

ElizabebK. 

Wrajooe 




little # lfed 

Ridiaohood 

(WCKY) 



Baby Rose Marie 

^telle^eVy 

. "LAND OF MAKE BELIEVE." 



clean (Derby 



CBS 



NBC FAVORITES 

JULIAN ALTMAN, SYLVIA AI.TMAN, 
WINNIFRED TOONEY, JIMMIE McCALLION. 




Page 18 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



June, 1931 



SUNDAY 



JUNE 



14 



21 



28 



E.D.T 



EASTERN DAYLIGHT 


4 


30 


5 


30 


6 


15 


30 


45 


7 


15 


30 


45 


8 


15 


30 


45 


9 


30 10 


30 


11 


30 


12 


30 


E.S.T. orCD.T. 


3 


30 


4 


30 


5 


15 


30 


45 


6 


15 


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45 


7 


15 


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45 


8 


30 1 9 


30 


10 


30 


11 


30 


CENTRAL STANDARD 


2 


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3 


30 


4 


15 


30 


45 


5 


15 


30 


45 


6 


IS 


30 


45 


7 


30 


8 


30 


9 


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10 


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Call. 730 MONTREAL cnrni 

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610 K'NS'S CITY WD AF 
1090 ST. LOUIS KMOX 
550 ST. LOUIS kfuo 
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*On Air Part Time. 



4 

E.S. 

3 



30 



E.D.T 

5 

E.S. 

4 



30 

E.D.T 

6 

E.S.l 

5 

15 
30 

45 

E.D.T 

7 

E.S. 

6 



15 
30 

45 

E.D.T 



8 

E.S. 

7 



E.S.T 



15 

30 
45 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 
ffl Dr. S. Parkes Cadman 

Assisted by radio choir and orches- 
tra; director, George Dilworth. 

(U Williams Oilomatics 

Vocal soloists, orchestra; orchestra 
director, Josef Koestner. 

© Cathedral Hour 

Channon Collinge, conductor; vocal 
soloists ; Cathedral choir. 

ffl Dr. S. Parkes Cadman 
a Over Jordan 

Negro Biblical stories dramatized; 
spiritual (15 min.), followed by 

@1 "Your Eyes in Music" 

Contralto soloists, orchestra. 

O Cathedral Hour 
ID "Pop" Concert 

Orchestra direction, Walter Logan, 
from Cleveland. 

151 National Vespers 

Dr. Harry Emerson Fosdick, mixed 
sextet, orchestra. 

Sermon by Rev. D. G. Barnhouse 

From Philadelphia. 

H"Pop" Concert 
[5] National Vespers 
Pastorale 

Andre Kostelanetz, conductor, with 
mixed quartet. 

ffl Catholic Hour 

Paulist choir; direction, Father 
Finn ; sermon and questions. 

[U Margaret Olsen 
Q Fox Fur Trappers 

With Earle Nelson 

ffl Catholic Hour 
[3| Radio Luminaries 

Breen and de B,ose, specialty duo; 
Sam Herman, xylophonist. 

Fox Fur Trappers 
ffl Catholic Hour 
a Northern Lights 

istrid Fjelde, soprano; Tollefsen 
trio. 

Howard Dandies 

Betty Smart, contralto ; Ben Alley, 
tenor ; Freddie Rich's orchestra. 

ffl Catholic Hour 
a Northern Lights 
Howard Dandies 

ffl Henry Hadley and His Gold 

Seal Orchestra 
® Rudy Vallee and His 

Connecticut Yankees 
© The World's Business 

Dr. Julius Klein, Assistant Secretary 
of Commerce. 

ffl Henry Hadley 's Orchestra 
[Cg Rudy Vallee 
Q Piano Pals 

With Helen Nugent, contralto. 

[H R. C. A. Victor Program 

Orchestra; direction, Nathaniel Shil- 
kret. 

a Theatrical Scrap-book 

Montrose J. Moses. 

© Daddy and RoIIo 

Father and son act. 

LU R. C. A. Victor Program 
a Theatrical Scrap-book 
The Gauchos 

ffl Chase and Sanborn 

Maurice Chevalier, soloist; orchestra 
direction, David Rubinoff. 

[U Enna Jettick Melodies 

Soloists and mixed quartet, orches- 
tra. 

O "Devils, Drugs and Doctors" 

Howard W. Haggard, M. D. 

ffl Chase and Sanborn 
[3] Collier's Radio Hour 

Skits and specialties, speakers. 

Q Kate Smith's Swanee Music 

ffl Chase and Sanborn 
® Collier's Radio Hour 
© Kaltenborn Edits the News 
ffl Chase and Sanborn 
© Collier's Radio Hour 
Tastyeast Gloom Chasers 

Comedy act with "The Colonel and 
Bud." 



SUNDAY LOCAL PROGRAMS 

12. D. T. Subtract 1 hour for E. S. T. or 
C. D. T.; 2 hours for C. S. T. or M. D. T.; 
3 hours for M. S. T. or P. D. T. 

12:30 p. M. — Frank Gittleson, concert violin- 
ist, WBAL. 
12:30— Polish Music Hour, WLS. 



2:15— Little Brown Church, WLS. 
3:00— Crosley Theatre, WLW. 
3:30 — Chinatown Rescue Mission, WMCA. 
5:00 — Artists' Program, KMOX. 
5:00 — Across the Footlights, KOA. 
5:00 — Vesper Church Services, KDKA. 
5:00 — Uncle Ed and His Family Circle, 
WCAO. 



5:15 — Gypsy Music-makers, KMBC. 
5:30— Children's Hour, WPG. 
6:00 — Good Humor Sports Review, WBBM. 
6:00 — The Romany Trail, WBAL. 
7:00 — Conservatory of Music Concert, WLW. 
7:00 — The Baltimoreans, WBAL. 
7:15 — Red Lacquer and Jade (semi-classic), 
WOR. 



7:30 — Public School Musicale, WTAR. 

7:30 — Organ Recital, KDKA. 

8:00 — Jarvis Street Baptist Church, Toronto, 

CKGW. 
8:00 — Musical Comedy Hour, WGN. 
8:15 — Mike and Herman (humor), WBBM. 
8:30 — Sunday Evening Club (semi-religious), 

WMAQ. 



June, 1931 



WHAT'S ON THE AIR 



Page 19 



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9 

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10 



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12 

E.S.T. 
11 

30 



CHAIN PROGRAMS 

[A] "Our Government" 

David Lawrence, from Washington. 
(First 15 min.) 

[B] Atwater Kent Program 

Famous vocal soloists, orchestra 
( :15 to :30). 

ffl Program [A], Then Program [B] 

[D] Collier's Radio Hour 

(:00 to :15.) 

HI Bayuk Stag Party 

Guests, male quartet, orchestra 
(:15 to :30). 

[4] Program [0, Then Program [E] 
\5\ Program [D], Then Program [B] 
O The Coty Playgirl 

Irene Bordoni. 

[2] Atwater Kent Program 

(:30 to :45) Followed by 

\C\ Iodent Club of the Air 

Dramatic sketch, big brother Bob 
Emery, orchestra. 

[U Bayuk Stag Party 

(:30 to :45.) Followed by 

B Westinghouse Salute 
Q Graham Paige Hour 

Detroit Symphony Orchestra with 
Edgar A. Guest, poet-philosopher. 



g] Iodent Club of the Air 

(:00 to :15.) 

[B] National Dairy Productions 

Famous trials in history ( :15 to 
:30). 

[D] Westinghouse Salute 

(:00 to :15.) 

[4] Program [Dj 

( :00 to :15.) Followed by 

Floyd Gibbons 
[TJ Program [§], Then Program QU 
[5] Program [D|, Then Program [B] 
O To Be Announced 

[C] Sunday at Seth Parkers 

( :45 to :00) Down-east "Sociable." 

[2] National Dairy Productions 

( :30 to :45.) Followed by 

Sunday at Seth Parkers 

(:45*to :00). 

\6\ Kellogg's Slumber Music 

String ensemble ; direction, Ludwig 
Laurier. 



A Fortune Builders 
B 



Douglas Gilbert interviews (:30 to 



:45). 

Star Reveries 



Helen Gilligan, soprano ; Milton 
Watson, tenor; Mark Warnow's or- 
chestra ( :45 to :00). 

Program A Followed by B 



[3] Sunday at Seth Parker's 

( :00 to :15) Followed by 

Muriel and Vee 

Vocal and instrumental duo (:15 to 
:30). 

ffl "Gangland" 

Charles Francis Cole ( :00 to :15). 

Followed by 

[E] Heel Hugger Harmonies 

Male quartet, string ensemble (:15 
to :30). 

© Continental String Quartet 
[§] Russian Cathedral Choir 

Vocal and instrumental soloists. 

[9] Los Argentinos 

Tango orchestra. 

O Around the Samovar 

Peter Biljo's Balalaika orchestra. 



[TJ South Sea Islanders 

Hawaiian ensemble. 

[3] Reminiscences 

Armchair quartet. 

O Quiet Harmonies 

Vincent Sorey, conductor. 

[2] Larry Funk's Orchestra 

Dance music. 

@] Henry Theis and His Orchestra 

Dance music. 

Q Nocturne 

Ann Leaf at the organ. 



3.D.T. 



8 

3.T. 

7 



JUNE 



14 



21 



28 



SUNDAY 



C.S.T. 



30 



9 

S.T. 

8 



C.S.T. 



30 



C.D.T. 

10 

C.S.T. 

9 



30 



C.D.T. 

11 

C.S.T. 

10 

30 



4 30 


5 


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6 


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7 


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8 


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9 


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11 


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EASTERN DAYLIGHT 


3 30 


4 


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5 15 


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6 


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7 


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8 


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I 9 


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3 


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4 lis 


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5 


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